AVS Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,765 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
For cutting holes for new low-voltage mounting brackets, should I just stick with my trusty keyhole saw or maybe start using my oscillating multi-tool? I love the multi-tool for cutting huge sections of drywall out since it's fast, precise, and cuts clean. However is there any downside to using one for cutting smaller holes like for the brackets? Any advantage to the keyhole saw? Maybe avoiding slicing through AC wiring too quickly? My only complaint about the keyhole saw is that it can cut kind of jaggedly depending on the rock. That or maybe I'm just not doing it right. Haha.

Thoughts? Preferences?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,018 Posts
I vote for keyhole saw. I've been surprised by obstructions. Keyhole saw is quicker, too.

For anyone looking to purchase - I wish I bought a folding keyhole saw, as I carry it in my tool bag.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,765 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I vote for keyhole saw. I've been surprised by obstructions. Keyhole saw is quicker, too.

For anyone looking to purchase - I wish I bought a folding keyhole saw, as I carry it in my tool bag.
I didn't go with a folding saw, but made a ghetto sheath that does the trick. I sure wish these things came with SOMETHING to store them in. Perhaps I'll with a folding model next go-around.

Thanks for the responses. Guess I'll stick primarily with the keyhole saw. I just thought the other one might make cleaner cuts. But yeah, the keyhole saw is definitely quick enough.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Montucky: I often use my Fein multitool for just that. I put blue painters tape on blade to see if drywall depth has been exceeded in areas with wires. I use as a wider blade for nice clean cuts. Rotozip for can lights already under drywall, using drywall bit with smooth tip and going opposite direction of blade rotation. Or hole saw sized to can fitting when using remodel cans, ie for my home theater build with backerboxes and cans not yet up there when drywall tacked up.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top