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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For my family room, I'm going to be tearing down the ceiling and one wall and putting up sound isolation clips (RSICs) and two layers of drywall with Green Glue. The other three walls, I'm going to put up an extra layer of drywall with Green Glue.


There's already tile on the concrete floor. The RSICs and two layers of drywall mean that the drywall will sit on the tiles at the edge of the room. In other words, for one wall, 'd put in a 1/8 to 1/4 inch gap between the drywall and the tile, and I'd fill the gap with caulk. I'll put trim over this. The drywall and trim will therefore overhang the tile, unless I cut the tile back from the wall. Additionally, the extra sheet of drywall for the other three walls and the accompanying trim will also overhang the tile.


I've already had to trim a one inch wide, 36 inch long port of the tile to put in a frame where a door had been. Using a dremel tool, a ceramic cutting bit, and a guide, it took me well over an hour and many passes to cut that one inch swath of tile.


Should I just allow the drywall and trim to overhang the tile? Or should I cut the tile? If I do cut the tile, how do I do this? An angle grinder?


Thanks for any help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
One thing I forgot to mention was that the tile has a rough surface. There will be gaps between the tile and anything installed above it. When the original owners tiled this room, the drywall and trim were directly on the cement floor, so they tiled right up to the trim.
 

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Leave the tile, I would have left it in place where you framed the wall as well. For reference the Sandman's (Ruben) SMX deluxe theater was built entirely over a tiled garage floor. I'm also assuming you are planning on carpeting the room.
 

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+1 to BIG's advice


I also assume you are going to do some kind of baseboard, which will help make the gaps look even along the length of the tile. If you aren't, then the expected carpet will cover your gap fine as well. Definitely caulk that gap though, otherwise you will start seeing dirt collecting around the edges of your room because that's where the air will be flowing between rooms and walls. Don't be shy with the caulk/silicone.
 
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