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If you want King Kong gigantic low end then the dbx 120A Subharmonic Synthesizer seems to be the logical chose to enhancing low end and experiential home cinema customization of the sub bass.


As used in the post production of Peter Jackson's (2005) remake of King Kong which has an enormous impact on some of the low end that I have heard though my JBL 4645 maybe a little more is needed, so I'll start with saving up, and then looking around on Google Product search in a few months time for best available price.










 

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Unfortunately the processor is designed for pro audio use, and has a high pass at 25Hz, so for HT it's rather pointless. Of course it will do a nice job of giving you more bass from a sub that doesn't really do much below 20-30Hz.



Modern soundtracks have plenty of bass content that hardly needs further emphasis. First we need to cleanly reproduce what's on the DVD at high playback levels before we worry about creating more.
 

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^^^^I guess it's no different than adding on DCX2496 and using the lowest crossover filter as most only drop down to 40Hz or maybe 30Hz. most of the laserdisc and DVD titles I have don't have too many issues expect the type of mixing techniques that where used at the time to create the films soundtrack.


I think The Towering Inferno should have been produced in Sensuuround like Earthquake instead cinemas just turned up the heating for The Towering Inferno LOL.


Besides audible 20Hz and upwards is what really counts.
 

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If you find this sort of thing interesting, and why would we all be in a sub forum if we didn't, then you are sure to find the Aphex 204 quite enchanting. In fact I suggest that it is the most bang for the buck in all of audio, at a mere ballpark street price of $250 including RCA-->Phone Plug adapters and cables.

You can read all about it on the Aphex page
www.aphex.com/204.htm

and I also have a page about it here:
www.soundoctor.com/aphex.htm


enjoy!
 

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Okay,


I'm kind of from the 'old school' on audio gear. I realize that new movie soundtracks have great bass and don't need any help, but I think there is a place for these bass-synth processors for helping out 'older' soundtracks. I've heard some modern DVD's on old 80's and early 90's movies and frankly, the ".1" channel is pretty worthless.


I want to have many older movies in my future blu-ray collection and I want them to bust out of my speakers with thunder and dynamics.


In the 90's with my old system, I used to play the laserdisc 2-channel track thru an EQ - dbx dynamic range expander - another EQ using the tape monitor function on my old pro-logic receiver. The results on old 80's movies would drop your jaw. Over time, I eventually sold off the old components but now I'm back in the market to rebuild a new home theater sound system.


I plan to 'someday' buy a bass synth device like this one along with a few dbx dynamic range expanders and an EQ in order to get more impact and 'life' into those old soundtracks. You would be surprised what these old dbx devices can do for the older soundtracks. You can get movies like Ghostbusters, Blade Runner the old Star Treks and others to sound just as 'punchy' and 'dynamic' as modern soundtracks then play them back in Pro-logic II. In fact, I'm surprised the studios didn't use this professional gear to remaster the old soundtracks for more enjoyment on modern blu-rays.


I would love the movie studios to 'spice up' old soundtracks and give you the audio track choice to play the 'original' or the 'geared up' versions. Believe me, you can get these old soundtracks to sound really really good with these devices.
 
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