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I understand that [email protected] can be fully de-interlaced by weaving the two adjacent fields together to produce a progressive frame. However, for 60 fps material the two adjacent fields will be from different frames. In this situation, how does the TV de-interlace the signal?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by dude101 /forum/post/15514287


I understand that [email protected] can be fully de-interlaced by weaving the two adjacent fields together to produce a progressive frame. However, for 60 fps material the two adjacent fields will be from different frames. In this situation, how does the TV de-interlace the signal?

Assuming that 1080i30 is 1080i60 which is generated from 1080p30 then weaving will work.


1080i60 generated from 1080p60 cannot be deinterlaced. How an HDTV processes it is the question. Does it just use every other field and double each line or does it use a video processor to generate each progressive frame based on fields before and after that field. How well the processing is done is another factor.
 

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I can't forsee a situation where you'd ever encounter a 1080/30i signal.


There are two types of 1080/60i signal, refered to as "film sourced" and "video sourced".

-In the former, there was a progressive image (either 1080/24p or 1080/30p) that was broke up into half images. The deinterlacer's film mode can reassemble these back into a progressive frame again.

-In the latter, the interlaced fields were captured at different points in time. The video mode of the deinterlacer will look at the still parts of the image and weave them together as it does in the film mode. For moving objects, it will simply upscale the image ("bob deinterlacing") to fill in the missing space.
 

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As I understand the process, correctly deinterlacing native 1080i/60 content requires motion adaptive deinterlacing.


If there is no motion in the image, then two consecutive odd & even interlaced fields are perfectly correlated and can be combined into one progressive frame, which is displayed twice to maintain the 60 Hz frame rate.


If there is motion in the image, then two consecutive odd & even interlaced fields are not perfectly correlated and cannot be combined into one progressive frame. Instead, line doubling or line interpolation synthesizes the missing lines in each field, thereby artificially converting each interlaced field into a progressive frame.


Motion adaptive deinterlacing may shift between the two methods after each pair of fields. Or it may utilize the two methods simultaneously w/in each pair of fields, applying the first method to any static segments of the image, the second method to any motive segments of the image.


AJ
 
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