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Discussion Starter #1
I have a LG OLED C6 65" TV I usually do a lot of research and education before I make a purchase like this. But I did very little.
I almost bought last year but the consensus by a lot of "experts" said wait one more year and did. But I went again this year.


So overall I've been pretty happy (coming from KURO Elite Pro-111 50")


The Black crush has me a little concerned and "micro" judder but the overall experience has been good. Netflix, Amazon, PS3, TIVO (1080p).
I hope to get it professionally calibrated.


Anyway I just received the Philips UHD Blu-Ray player and bought one of the higher rated 4K Movies (The Martian).


Again I've been pretty lazy and did NOTHING on research or setup. I just plugged in in (using old, but good, HDMI cables).


Everything seemed to auto detect, auto sense and it said 4K HDR in the corner and I thought I was good to go.


Watched about 30 minutes. It felt like good quality BluRay (1080p). I was actually a little disappointed in the Quality and the Movie itself.


It was late and thought my wife and I could finish it another night.


As soon as I stopped the Movie the TV popped up a box saying something to the Effect "Deep Color HDR Device Detected, You must Click OK to Enable and reboot the TV to have it take effect." So I did.


So then I was curious. And started the movie back up.


It was Night and Day difference.


1) It immediately sucked us both into the movie more and now we didn't want to shut it off.
2) So it appears that the "4K" isn't the big thing here on these TV's that make them pop but the Color Depth.


BTW, I didn't see any crushed blacks (I've done zero adjustment on the TV). No Micro Judder (that I was seeing on some PS3 Blu-Ray movies and some 4K streaming).


One thing that confuses me is this "Soap Opera Effect" (SOE) that folks keep referencing.


I understand, years ago when my Mom would watch a Soap something was different than Movies or even Weekly Shows.
I have always assumed this has something to do with the Lens that softens things a little in movies. Makes Actors look better.


Once I enabled Deep Color. The Zits came out. The Fake looking Sets came out that you can see were quickly spray painted. etc.
This was a problem for Live Broad casts (e.g. Local News Anchor) when HD first came out. In that they had to come up with cleaner sets, better lighting, Makeup etc.


The 4K with Deep Color brings this problem up a notch.


But I can't help think it looks "Soap Opera" -ish. Is that what folks are referring to?
It's good and bad. The higher quality pulled us both in, even though in some scenes it looks like a little cheaper / Faker / Soap Opera set looking.
I would not call this a bad effect. Over time they will have to figure it out like they did for HD.


Am I confused that that this is "Soap Opera Effect", how could it possibly be avoided if the more detail you see the more Soap Opera it looks.
It might be just a matter of getting used to that much detail.
 

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There's a couple of different things going on in what you're describing:

The Soap Opera Effect(SOE) is what happens when a TV takes a 24fps(24p) video and inserts new frames to match the native frame rate of the TV(usually 60hz or 120hz). These inserted frames are a blend of two other frames. This reduces motion blur and judder, at the sacrifice of what is called the Soap Opera Effect, an artificial smoothing that makes film based video(24p) look like TV(often shot at 30/60 fps). Because it requires video processing, some TVs can produce small juddering or skips when a lot of motion is going on. On the LG OLEDs it is called TruMotion. I prefer to just turn this off and send the TV a straight 24p signal, it then just multiplies each frame 5 times, which doesn't create that SOE but still improves motion.

The HDR Deep Color option is what allows HDR video to better show it's entire dynamic range. Deep Color allows for 12 bits per color(RGB) to describe what color a pixel should be. This reduces color banding and allows for a Wider Color Gamut(WCG) to be used. This will make HDR video pop out way more with a lot more detail.

To sum up, High frame rate (HFR) video playback improves the detail of video as it relates to motion. Deep color improves the detail in regards to color accuracy. HDR expands the amount of dynamic range a video can have, allowing for brighter and darker colors. WCG expands the palette of colors that can be displayed.

All of these combine to drastically improve the clarity and quality of the picture. As you have noticed, that's not always a good thing :devil:

PS I remember when Peter Jackson started used HFR in the first Hobbit. People didn't like it because the improved motion resolution prevented the CGI and sets from blending as well. As display technology improves, so too must the content.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
There's a couple of different things going on in what you're describing:

The Soap Opera Effect(SOE) is what happens when a TV takes a 24fps(24p) video and inserts new frames to match the native frame rate of the TV(usually 60hz or 120hz). These inserted frames are a blend of two other frames. This reduces motion blur and judder, at the sacrifice of what is called the Soap Opera Effect, an artificial smoothing that makes film based video(24p) look like TV(often shot at 30/60 fps). Because it requires video processing, some TVs can produce small juddering or skips when a lot of motion is going on. On the LG OLEDs it is called TruMotion. I prefer to just turn this off and send the TV a straight 24p signal, it then just multiplies each frame 5 times, which doesn't create that SOE but still improves motion.

The HDR Deep Color option is what allows HDR video to better show it's entire dynamic range. Deep Color allows for 12 bits per color(RGB) to describe what color a pixel should be. This reduces color banding and allows for a Wider Color Gamut(WCG) to be used. This will make HDR video pop out way more with a lot more detail.

To sum up, High frame rate (HFR) video playback improves the detail of video as it relates to motion. Deep color improves the detail in regards to color accuracy. HDR expands the amount of dynamic range a video can have, allowing for brighter and darker colors. WCG expands the palette of colors that can be displayed.

All of these combine to drastically improve the clarity and quality of the picture. As you have noticed, that's not always a good thing :devil:

PS I remember when Peter Jackson started used HFR in the first Hobbit. People didn't like it because the improved motion resolution prevented the CGI and sets from blending as well. As display technology improves, so too must the content.
Thanks for the reply.

I always that "Soap Operas" looked way different than regular Evening Shows. But neither ever had Juddering or Skips. So I've always assumed when people Label something SOE it's lack of grain and soft lens or what ever they do to film to make it look like what it does.

I well understand dynamic range but I'm a little shocked at the amount it contributes compared to the quadruple of the number of pixels contributes.
 

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Yeah, we're starting to reach the limit of being able to discern pixel density, that is until we have video walls!

Total Recall here we come...
 

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Yeah, we're starting to reach the limit of being able to discern pixel density, that is until we have video walls!

Total Recall here we come...
With current displays, you have to sit really close to see the resolution difference between HD and UHD but you can see color and HDR benefits from across the room. Where I think I see resolution differences at normal viewing distance (for me) is in background textures, like trees. They look more like real trees and less like a painted backdrop to me. Maybe it's an illusion or maybe it's that some content just does a better job of shooting so that the background looks nice and crisp. But I have no doubt that the color and tone range (in HDR) are striking improvements. And, of course, the deep blacks instead of those blacks that looked like a chalk board that hadn't been washed in ages really enhance just about any scene.
 

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You won't notice black crushing unless you view it side by side with an LCD. It's silly to worry about it. Just pretend it's not happening and enjoy the beautiful picture.

I like the SOE. It makes things look more like real life. I turn it on for a few weeks, then turn it off for a few. It's like switching TVs.
 

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Hi,

I just wanted to say thanks for this info on Deep Color and TruMotion - you fixed my new TV (a 65" C6)! Out of the box, non-4K content through a Fire TV through a Denon X4300H (e.g. Hulu) had what I was describing as a "video game effect." All the people seemed to move slightly unnaturally, and it looked like it was filmed with a video camera. It was weird and awkward, and I knew it had to be a settings issue. So I finally found this post, and turned on Deep Color and turned off TruMotion, and the picture now looks much more natural, and soooooo much nicer than my previous TV, a 2008 Samsung LED. I'll get around to investigating other settings suggestions soon, but these two were huge. Thanks again!

Sue

There's a couple of different things going on in what you're describing:

The Soap Opera Effect(SOE) is what happens when a TV takes a 24fps(24p) video and inserts new frames to match the native frame rate of the TV(usually 60hz or 120hz). These inserted frames are a blend of two other frames. This reduces motion blur and judder, at the sacrifice of what is called the Soap Opera Effect, an artificial smoothing that makes film based video(24p) look like TV(often shot at 30/60 fps). Because it requires video processing, some TVs can produce small juddering or skips when a lot of motion is going on. On the LG OLEDs it is called TruMotion. I prefer to just turn this off and send the TV a straight 24p signal, it then just multiplies each frame 5 times, which doesn't create that SOE but still improves motion.

The HDR Deep Color option is what allows HDR video to better show it's entire dynamic range. Deep Color allows for 12 bits per color(RGB) to describe what color a pixel should be. This reduces color banding and allows for a Wider Color Gamut(WCG) to be used. This will make HDR video pop out way more with a lot more detail.

To sum up, High frame rate (HFR) video playback improves the detail of video as it relates to motion. Deep color improves the detail in regards to color accuracy. HDR expands the amount of dynamic range a video can have, allowing for brighter and darker colors. WCG expands the palette of colors that can be displayed.

All of these combine to drastically improve the clarity and quality of the picture. As you have noticed, that's not always a good thing :devil:

PS I remember when Peter Jackson started used HFR in the first Hobbit. People didn't like it because the improved motion resolution prevented the CGI and sets from blending as well. As display technology improves, so too must the content.
 

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Hello!

I have figured the TruMotion myself a few weeks ago as I was finding the TV to feel unnatural motion wise. Today I tried plugging in directly my PC to play some games on it. I used some new high quality HDMI 4k HDR ARC certified cable, but couldn't get to connect it at 4k 60hz 4:4:4. I tried 2 different pc, one with a 980 TI Gaming and the other with a GTX 1060. Both running windows 10.

Neither would allow it to me.

When set to 1080p, I could feed 24 to 60hz, 8 or 12 bpc with a choice of RGB, 4:2:0 or 4:4:4
When switching to native 3920x2160, 60hz only offered 8bpc at 4:2:0. Going down to 24hz let me choose 8 bpc at 4:4:4.

I switched cable to another 4k HDR one and the same happened, with both pc.

I selected game mode on HDMI 2 (input used) as well as expert dark mode but it didn't change anything.

I tried playing the LG Color 4K HDR demo from the pc, and it looked aweful with the colors so off it couldn't even be watched. Using the same demo on a USB drive plugged to TV plays perfectly.

Anyone had this trouble before ?
 

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Hello!

I have figured the TruMotion myself a few weeks ago as I was finding the TV to feel unnatural motion wise. Today I tried plugging in directly my PC to play some games on it. I used some new high quality HDMI 4k HDR ARC certified cable, but couldn't get to connect it at 4k 60hz 4:4:4. I tried 2 different pc, one with a 980 TI Gaming and the other with a GTX 1060. Both running windows 10.

Neither would allow it to me.

When set to 1080p, I could feed 24 to 60hz, 8 or 12 bpc with a choice of RGB, 4:2:0 or 4:4:4
When switching to native 3920x2160, 60hz only offered 8bpc at 4:2:0. Going down to 24hz let me choose 8 bpc at 4:4:4.

I switched cable to another 4k HDR one and the same happened, with both pc.

I selected game mode on HDMI 2 (input used) as well as expert dark mode but it didn't change anything.

I tried playing the LG Color 4K HDR demo from the pc, and it looked aweful with the colors so off it couldn't even be watched. Using the same demo on a USB drive plugged to TV plays perfectly.

Anyone had this trouble before ?
EDIT :
To enable Chroma 4:4:4 4k 60 Hz support, first go in the 'General' menu, then enable 'HDMI ULTRA Deep Color' for the HDMI port that you are using. After, change the input icon to PC in the 'All inputs' menu, accessible thru the remote input button. .
 

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And where is that in the settings of the OLED65C6P? I looked many time and didn't find a UHD deep color mode.
To enable Chroma 4:4:4 support, first go in the 'General' menu, then enable 'HDMI ULTRA Deep Color' for the HDMI port that you are using. After, change the input icon to PC in the 'All inputs' menu, accessible thru the remote input button. .
 

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To enable Chroma 4:4:4 support, first go in the 'General' menu, then enable 'HDMI ULTRA Deep Color' for the HDMI port that you are using. After, change the input icon to PC in the 'All inputs' menu, accessible thru the remote input button. .
Thanks a lot! Only looked in picture settings previously, just found the deep color option in the general tab like you said.

Gonna try to plug back a pc right away :)
 

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Which one is considered HDR, the 8bpc RGB complete or YCbCr 4:4:4 ? I tried all the option and the TV never shows as HDR, even when playing the LG HDR demo.

Windows can't output video in HDR yet.

The update should arrive this year.

Only 2 video games work in HDR, but they bypass the windows directX API.
 

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Windows can't output video in HDR yet.

The update should arrive this year.

Only 2 video games work in HDR, but they bypass the windows directX API.
Good to know. Which game are they, think I'll give it a try.

Poor me that was thinking about trying Elite Dangerous and Star Citizen in 4k HDR :)
 

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Hi!

So much reading! Picked up a 55eg9200 and I was wondering if the soap opera effect spoken here is the same thing I noticed while watching TV network series. Everything pops colour wise but it's odd, almost like I'm at the set watching it... people pop out, backgrounds look fake lol. Hilarious watching in car scenes and the background. The term soap opera reminded me of what soap opera shows look like and what I'm kinda experiencing haha.

I didn't notice a tru motion setting and I turned on the hdmi 1 deep colour. The set top box is a cisco cis430 pvr

All the 4k stuff on youtube is brilliant though :D

Thanks!
 

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Popping this back to the top of the heap again as I just received my OLED LGB6P yesterday (thanks Cleveland AV!) and all seemed well after fiddling with the settings to turn Trumotion and all that junk off, playing content through some apps on my Xbox (Netflix/Amazon/Plex)...and then I clicked on ULTRA HD Deep Color for the HDMI2 output that my receiver was on and it all went to hell. Soap opera effect galore, along with some nasty clipping, no matter what I did-- unless I used the apps on the LG directly-- so that pointed to the "Deep Color" as the culprit-- turned it off and I was fine.

I don't see why this is happening, though. Does it mean I can't ever have this feature enabled? Is it a handshake problem with TV/receiver (tried multiple cables, same effect)? :confused:

Note my XBOX one S video settings are also set at a color depth of 36 bits per pixel (12-bit), but for what it's worth this soap opera motion disaster seemed to happen on my PS4 (non-Pro) as well, also using the same HDMI port.
 
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