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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I hear about an un-obstructed view of the tower for placement of the OTA antenna. I wonder what does this mean exactly? Are we talking mountains and such only or do houses and trees make enough of a differance too? Of course large steel and stone buildings would matter and when I say houses I mean normal residential type.

Also Im looking at a Terk 55 and wonder how you people feel about it. Im in Basking Ridge NJ about 30 to 40 miles to the NYC towers. Im looking at the terk for its low profile since Im in a town house.


Thanks for any help.


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Gonna name my HT "Tooth and Nails" for the battle my wife is putting up against it.
 

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I live about 35 miles from Atlanta's towers with a mountain in front of my house. The terrain from here to the towers is not flat and I'm getting good reception on 3 of 4 channels with a 120" Radio Shack Antenna mounted in the attic with a CM 7777 pre-amp. I have no experience with the Terk 55 but from what I've read its a piece of crap. For a low profile antenna, you might want to start with a Channel Master Stealth that you can pick up at Lowe's. Good Luck!
 

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The Terk 55? Run!! Seriously, I have a Terk 55 and it is next to useless. Since buying it, I've subsequently read other postings that claim it as virtually useless. The only thing that I've found it useful for is receiving one station -- a VHF station that my UHF Yagi cannot get. When I tried to get it to receive more than one station, it would only do so sporadically and I could never get it to receive all four (and I'm only 15 miles from the towers). So, I hope I save you some money that I wish I had saved by not buying the Terk.


If all the towers are on a straight line, I suggest that you get a very directional antenna. I tried the Radio Shack double bowtie and it was generally successful, but had multipath problems with one station. Settling on the very-directional Yagi has solved everything. A perfect signal -- never drops out. It is in my attic, which is fairly small. Search this forum for others' experiences. You'll find many. Good luck.



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I had a tree right in front of my antenna. So I spent a weekend almost killing my self and cut down the tree to below the antenna. It made absolutely no difference. The hills and mountains are another matter.


Rick
 

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Terks are not highly regarded on this forum. My obstuction happens to be a large hill made of iron ore right in my line of sight to Philly. Also, if your signal is weak to begin with, anything that introduces a reflection can cause multipath which results in dropouts. I was picking up WHYY in the low 40's on the signal meter of my DTC-100. However there was severe multipath. I live against a lightly traveled road and everytime a car, and worse, a truck passed by, the meter would dip and dropouts would occur. Turns out the cars/trucks were introducing and/or amplifing the multipath.
 

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The attenuating and reflective effects of obstructions between and near the transmission path will vary because of installation site configuration, transmission configuration/proximity, seasonal issues, atmospheric conditions, and (potentially) dynamic transmission levels. The closer a reception site is to the fringe of a given signal, the higher the probability that attenuation could effect the signal. Large objects such as mountains and buildings are obvious candidates, but anything with water in it (be that a leaf or the rain) can impact reception characteristics.


My installation is a good example. I am about 50-55 miles over mostly flat terrain from the Detroit area digital transmitters using a CM4248 and CM7775. Most days I can receive a fairly solid lock from most of the digital stations. I have trouble with a few because of this distance and some are below maximum radiation level. The rotor usually works to resolve this, but not always. I have less trouble in winter than in summer. I have a large growth of trees less than 100' from my antenna that encompass the entire receiving direction and exceed (by almost double) the height of the antenna. Clearly, these have some effect.


Late one fall 4 years ago, I was watching the analog VHF channels from Cleveland (some 150 miles away). It was a bit snowy, but still watchable. There is a contingent of Clevelanders here that regularly watch the Detroit digital stations. We have Lake Erie to thank for the unobstructed view.


I second, or third, (or hundredth) caution in the use of a Terk (or similar antenna). It is possible that it will work, but not likely very well. Just tell your neighbors about how "expensive" that honker yagi was and invite them in for a beer, er, um, Chardonnay, and an eye-full of HD http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/wink.gif



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[This message has been edited by Man E (edited 08-29-2001).]
 

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I have an inexpensive (read $50) 60 inch YAGI antenna mounted in my attic on a rotor. The signal goes through my slate roof and the plywood underneath it. I live about 13 miles (as a crow flies) from the WTC and I get signal strength in the 90's with this setup.


Obstructions mean mountains where the transmitter is below the top of the mountain. I don't believe that this situation exists in NJ.


Lee
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by LeeAntin:
Obstructions mean mountains where the transmitter is below the top of the mountain. I don't believe that this situation exists in NJ.
Obstructions are also trees. My antenna point between two black walnut trees. When the wind blows, channel 57 breaks up badly, 45 is better, 29, 24, and 20 are not effected much.


In the winter (55 to 65 degrees where I live), the leaves fall off and the problem goes away. In the summer (65 to 75 degrees)the leaves come back and the problem comes back.


I thinned out the leaves last weekend and the problem was greatly reduced.
 
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