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i am seriously caught in a choice here and need some expert advice. i can get both receivers for pretty much the same price...the specs are similiar on both, i just like the looks of the yamaha much better, and i have a yamaha now and it has been very good to me. ive searched and found several Denon vs. brandX or similiar threads but never seen one comparing the two here. so your thoughts are greatly appreciated.
http://www.yamaha.com/yec/products/R...R/RX-V3300.htm

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http://www.usa.denon.com/catalog/products.asp?l=1&c=2
 

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My quick take on feature differences (may not be complete) is:


Denon Advantages:

- Has 7 fully-powered channels, so you can run two rear speakers - which is recommended.

- Has video upconversion, so all video inputs can be run into an HDTV via a single component connection.

- Has full 7.1 inputs (Yammy has 5.1)

- Is a 7.1 processor, with 7.1 outputs (Yamaha is really a 6.1 system)

- Uses dual Burr-Brown DACs per channel (may or may not be audible difference)


Yamaha Advantages:

- More substantial power amp. Would probably produce 20-30 more watts per channel than the Denon. Perhaps even a bit more than that.

- Yamaha states that the receiver's software is upgradable via the RS-232 port. I haven't seen Denon make that claim.

- Has Zone 2 amp, 2 x 25 watts per channel.


Tom B.
 

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Tom,


I think the 3803 also has Onscreen menu in component video also. Most other receivers require S-Video hook up.


Reggie
 

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The RXV3300 would be my choice. Same price as 3803 is a bangin' deal!


One clarification to Tom's post: The 3300 has 2 front effect channels which are 25 watts per channel. They are used to provide height information and when used it is considered an 8.1 setup. The effect channels can be turned off and used as a zone 2 speaker output. Additionally, the 3300 has two dedicated zone 2 speaker outputs, and the B channel mains can be assigned to either zone 1 or 2. So you could effectively run a complete 6.1 HT as well as have 6 zone 2 speakers directly connected to the receiver. If you are extremely psychotic about the zone 2 thing, you can even divert front and rear center to zone 2! *lol*


The 3300 does up- and down-conversion between composite and s-video (not to component though). Composite and s-video outputs are available to zone 2 as well.


Don't forget all inputs and outputs are gold-plated too. ;)


I've been thinking about picking one up myself, so I've been studying it inside-out.
 

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If you are thinking about using rear channels, then be advised that there is a significant difference for the listener when using 2 rear channels vs 1 (i.e. a 7.1 config vs a 6.1). Studies have shown that when using a single rear channel, that when the action pans around the rear, it can cause confusing effects, as if the sound moves around behind you but when it gets to the center, it seems to move forward and then it goes back again as the sound moves to the other surround channel. Something to do with how people perceive single source sound behind them and with that rear channel being lined up with the front center.


In general, using a 6.1 speaker system (or an 8.1 with only one rear channel) is not recommended by many HT experts. Thus the quick transition to 7.1 in nearly all high-end gear.


Tom B.
 
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