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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just replaced my 3½ year old Toshiba with a Denon 1600 that hasn't arrived yet. I'm curious about how well the Denon handles layer changes since one of its touted features is a 3MB buffer that is supposed to reduce or eliminate the delay. By comparison, the layer change on my Toshiba was awful most of the time. Does the Denon generally perform layer changes seemlessly?


Regards,

Steve
 

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No, I found the 1600 to have a distinct pause, exactly like the Panasonics. Sorry!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Sounds like the Denon is no better than the Toshiba. Makes one wonder what's the use of having a 3MB buffer? Maybe the Toshiba was better than I thought. Oh well, thanks for the disappointing info.


-Steve
 

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The 3MB buffer really doesn't seem to do much in this case. The layer change on the 1600 is about the same as it was on my old Toshiba 2109.


On the other hand, maybe the problem is that the Panasonic MPEG chip it uses has a REALLY slow layer change, and it takes the 3MB buffer to speed it up to a reasonable time? I don't know, just guessing.


People with the Denon 3800 and 9000 models (which have a 4 MB buffer) usually report that their layer changes are seamless.
 

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I have a 1600 and the worse I've ever seen - one one or two DVDs - is a flash of what I can best describe as "pixelated noise" at layer changes. I have never seen (in a sample of about 30 DVDs) a 2 second pause.
 

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For myself, the layer change is the most disruptive part of watching dvd's. Unless you've got a trained eye and are looking for it, most people will never see things such as chroma unsampling errors. The denon 2900 doesn't show the layer change but I believe it has an 8mb buffer. You'd think a light bulb would turn on and they'd build all with larger buffers to compensate.
 

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My understanding is that the buffer memory is just marketing ploy. The speed of the layer change has to do mostly with the speed of the mechanics in the dvd transport. In the case of 1600, when I notice it I agree it lasts about 2 seconds. However, I must say most of the time I don't notice it at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks all. I received my 1600 late yesterday, so I guess I'll find out soon enough for myself . It sounds like there's a chance it might be a little better than my Toshiba. If it's no worse, then that's okay too.


-Steve
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by slb
Thanks all. I received my 1600 late yesterday, so I guess I'll find out soon enough for myself . It sounds like there's a chance it might be a little better than my Toshiba. If it's no worse, then that's okay too.
It shouldn't be any worse. The layer change is about average as far as DVD players go.


The disc I personally use to test this with is Tomorrow Never Dies. The layer change is at the very end of the "motorcycle vs helicopter" action scene.
 

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That sucks in the 1600, the layer change in the Denon 3800 is practically seemless/unnoticeable. I wonder why the difference (must be the panny design)?
 
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