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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

Hi,

 

For my new home, I have planned the below configuration. Please suggest the best way to transmit audio/video signal from source to the destination which are 75 feet apart.

 

Control Center in Study Room:

1) Digital Box

2) Blue Ray Player

3) Roku Player

4) 5.1 Receiver for family room

5) Audio input jacks for family room speaker system.

 

Family Room:

1) 70 inch TV

 

Media Room:

1) Projector

2) 7.1 Receiver

 

My electrician said I need 60 feet hdmi cable to run between control center and tv room, which I think is fine as I am able to find 60 feet hdmi cables.

 

The main issue is wiring hdmi cable between control center and media room which requires 75 feet as per my electrician.

 

I was chatting with monoprice customer service representative sometime ago and the representative told me that anything over 60 feet may not be reliable. If that is true, what are the different options that I have?

 

My builder do not want to wait for long, I need to provide them the wires and configuration by next week as my house wiring is scheduled for next week.

 

Thanks
 

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You should run a couple Cat5e cables (plus a Cat6 cable ideally) for the 75 ft. run. This will let you use an HDMI extender. You'll have plenty of time to decide which one you want. HDBaseT extenders are the best type currently available.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by cshepard  /t/1524611/desperately-need-your-help-on-how-to-run-hdmi-over-75-feet#post_24539076


You should run a couple Cat5e cables (plus a Cat6 cable ideally) for the 75 ft. run. This will let you use an HDMI extender. You'll have plenty of time to decide which one you want. HDBaseT extenders are the best type currently available.
Thanks cshepard. I forgot to mention, I am also running couple of cat6 cables along with hdmi. 

 

When I chatted with monoprice customer representative yesterday, he told me that it may not work over 75 feet between the source and the receiver. He said the signal would weaken at the receiving end, that's why i am totally confused.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by gsrinivas  /t/1524611/desperately-need-your-help-on-how-to-run-hdmi-over-75-feet#post_24539892


Thanks cshepard. I forgot to mention, I am also running couple of cat6 cables along with hdmi. 


When I chatted with monoprice customer representative yesterday, he told me that it may not work over 75 feet between the source and the receiver. He said the signal would weaken at the receiving end, that's why i am totally confused.

That's why you use the cat6 and an HDMI extender - because a 'normal' HDMI run of that length doesn't have a good chance of success...
 

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There are twisted pair transmitter/receivers that will easily go over 200'. Get a good cable and name brand hardware and you shouldn't have any problems.


Eric
 

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Google HDMI Extender and HDBaseT

 

HDBaseT is the top of the line solution and more expensive, one Cat6 cable will make the connection and you can also sent IR and Serial control data signals back from the destination to the source.

 

HDMI extenders will also get the job done, you may need to experiment with a set that works well with your AVR and TV.

 

I'd put an extra Cat 5 or 6 cable in that run to make it 4 in total.

 

The 4th can be used for anything you forgot, replace the TV with a Smart TV that wants an internet connection.  You have a network cable there.  Realize you need to run the IR control on a separate pair of cables.  You have 8 wires in the cat cable you can use.

 

I imagene you are also running a stereo pair to the same place for the centre speaker but this is about the picture runs to that spot.

 

You could also try running a blue jeans or similar 75ft HDMI and see if it works.  If it does you save on buying the Baluns.
 

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These are the cables to run to ensure proper video now and in the future in case of changes or cable failure/issues:

http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id=102&cp_id=10250&cs_id=1025002&p_id=6062&seq=1&format=2

and two of these:
http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id=102&cp_id=10232&cs_id=1023216&p_id=5906&seq=1&format=2


The 75' 22AWG HDMI cable will typically work just fine. But, as mentioned it may not work. So, you want backup cabling in place, just in case. I have personally run 1080p/60 sources at 75' without issue on that cable. I have never seen a problem. But, in case you do have an issue, then HDBT is the way to go, and this is the product:

http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id=109&cp_id=10110&cs_id=1011012&p_id=8122&seq=1&format=2


That will send your 1080p/60hz signal all over your house with no problem at all. One extender per point-to-point location.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·

Thanks AV_Integrated.

 

I was about to order cat6 cables, thanks for your suggestion, will get cat6a cables.

 

As per monoprice website, 75 feet hdmi doesn't support 1080p. am I missing something?

 

>
  • 720p/1080i Resolution - The Standard HDMI® Cable With Ethernet has sufficient bandwidth to transfer 720p/1080i video signals between 720p/1080i rated source and sink (display) devices.

 

One more option I was thinking is to talk to my electrician to find out if he can find a shorter route to the media room from control center in study room.I think I should be good if I can connect a 60 feet hdmi cable from control center to the media room.

 

For now, keeping all my options open.
 

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Standard Speed HDMI cable is not guaranteed to support 1080p signaling. But, on a quality cable it will send 1080p with no issue at all. I'm not telling you what some website says. I'm telling you what I have personally tested. I don't use a PC in my home setup, I actually ran the cable and tried it out myself to see if it would be supported... and it worked great. I've also run 1080p/24, in testing, over a 50' HDMI cable spliced into a 35' HDMI cable without issue as well.


It's not guaranteed, but I would certainly try it out first.


Remember, cable TV typically runs at 1080i/60 and Blu-ray movies are often 1080p/24. So, 1080p/60 is a higher data rate than either of those.
 

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It's a nice idea to order that cat6a STP as a single pre made cable as terminating that properly to maintain the shielding etc will be harder.  The shielding is part of what helps that cable transmit a great signal through the baluns.
 

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#1 don't order a premade cable for this solution, I ran 100' of cat 6 for a client a week ago and used HDBaseT baluns with no problems, field terminated with no problems, pre terminated cables will get filled with drywall mud, paint, or god knows what else. Not to mention each brand wants a different wiring protocol either A or B, I wouldn't worry about a shielded cable unless you are running it along with electrical wires.


#2 75' HDMI cable will probably only support 1080i, again personal experience
 

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If going with personal experience, I have a 75' HDMI cable that I have tested in my home with 1080p/60, it works great and represents the least expensive solution. Almost every person who ever says it does not work is NOT using 22AWG cabling from Monoprice with a point to point connection. I will say that I would not use a cable which is not built to that quality standard. On a budget, this is certainly a good way to start, and you can order that 75' cable, test it prior to installation, to see if it works okay, and simply return it if not.


As for cat-6STP, the major manufacturers, including Crestron, AMX, and Extron not only recommend it, but have papers on why it is the cable which should be used no matter what. I would love to say that just running cat-6 or cat-5e will definitely work, there is no question that the industry has found, flat out, that cat-6STP works better.


As for drywall mud in the cables? Absolutely this is possible. Wrap the cable ends in plastic bags and tape them shut. Dozens upon dozens of installations with HDMI cables over the years - this is how you protect the cables and it works every time. If it does get damaged, you can purchase cat-6STP ends and put them on yourself. It's not easy, but it's one of the best cabling solutions on the market today and gives the most future-proof option short of putting in conduit.
 

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Make sure to run Cat6 to both locations for HDBaseT extenders if/when the HDMI cables end up flaking out. I would also run RG6 to be safe. Link to good budget HDBaseT extenders: http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id=109&cp_id=10110&cs_id=1011012&p_id=8122&seq=1&format=2


I would also run a 60' Monoprice redmere HDMI cable for the shorter run. I'll never do a long, non-redmere run again. Much easier to work with than the 22awg cables and more likely to work properly. Link to 60ft: http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id=102&cp_id=10255&cs_id=1025507&p_id=9173&seq=1&format=2
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by tadr  /t/1524611/desperately-need-your-help-on-how-to-run-hdmi-over-75-feet#post_24560182


Make sure to run Cat6 to both locations for HDBaseT extenders if/when the HDMI cables end up flaking out. I would also run RG6 to be safe. Link to good budget HDBaseT extenders: http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id=109&cp_id=10110&cs_id=1011012&p_id=8122&seq=1&format=2


I would also run a 60' Monoprice redmere HDMI cable for the shorter run. I'll never do a long, non-redmere run again. Much easier to work with than the 22awg cables and more likely to work properly. Link to 60ft: http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id=102&cp_id=10255&cs_id=1025507&p_id=9173&seq=1&format=2
Unfortunately now, with about 30 or more of those HDMI extenders installed, I've seen about a 25% failure rate on them. This is just something to be aware of.


Also worth noting that Redmere cables have a known history of product failure due to the active electronics within them failing. This causes me far more worry than the headache of running the 22AWG cables from Monoprice. Yes, the heavier cables are more difficult to run, but I would rather deal with that difficulty than have a active HDMI cable whose active elements fail after 6 months or 12 months of use. While there aren't a lot of negative comments about the Redmere cables (and for good reason), it's still a fact that Redmere cables are powered and has electronic circuitry which can fail, which passive cables don't have an issue with. As well, passive cables can always have a active equalizer added to them at any point if desired.
 
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