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Discussion Starter #1
I have this Deuteranopia condition. I am planning on having several projectors calibrated by an ISF professional. The question is: Is it necessary for him to adjust the calibration to fit my vision problem in order for me to see a proper image? Below is a brief description of my malady:

"Deutan color vision deficiencies are by far the most common forms of color blindness. This subtype of red-green color blindness is found in about 6% of the male population, mostly in its mild form deuteranomaly.
Deuteranopia Color Spectrum
Normal and Deuteranopia Color Spectrum
When you have a look at the color spectrum of a deuteranopic person you can see that a variety of colors look different than in a normal color spectrum. Whereas red and green are the main problem colors, there are also for example some gray, purple and a greenish blue-green which can’t be distinguished very well."

Maybe someone here has had experience with this and can suggest the direction I should take.
 

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If you are watching with others, you may want to have a standard calibration done. Even if you aren't, it may be wise to have your own spectrum quantified to give the tech an idea of the corrections he needs to make. Gray scale, primary colors, and secondaries are all interrelated to one degree or another, and obtaining a correct gray scale and gamma to provide proper picture structure, shadow detail, and depth just may not be possible with a wildly skewed gamut.

Another option that may make a standard calibration an option for you is the special glasses that provide some correction to those with color blindness. Have you investigated those?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the thoughts. I’m having the calibrator in the next two weeks. I’ll go over it with him and see what he thinks
 

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aka jfinnie
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I have this Deuteranopia condition. I am planning on having several projectors calibrated by an ISF professional. The question is: Is it necessary for him to adjust the calibration to fit my vision problem in order for me to see a proper image? Below is a brief description of my malady:

"Deutan color vision deficiencies are by far the most common forms of color blindness. This subtype of red-green color blindness is found in about 6% of the male population, mostly in its mild form deuteranomaly.
Deuteranopia Color Spectrum
Normal and Deuteranopia Color Spectrum
When you have a look at the color spectrum of a deuteranopic person you can see that a variety of colors look different than in a normal color spectrum. Whereas red and green are the main problem colors, there are also for example some gray, purple and a greenish blue-green which can’t be distinguished very well."

Maybe someone here has had experience with this and can suggest the direction I should take.
I think it depends on what you want them to do.

If it is so that you see TV the same way as you see real life, just get a normal calibration.

If on the other hand you're hoping for a calibration that can compensate the image such that colours you can't distinguish are shifted to colours you can; so that details and contrasts in the image are no longer hidden from you; I'm not sure this is possible with a "standard" calibration, as the controls in a TV may not work the right way, and your calibrator may not know how to perform such adjustments. You effectively need to shift whole areas of colour you can't distinguish to others that you can, and realistically that needs a 3DLUT. And I don't think the resulting video will be pleasant for anyone who isn't you to watch, which is something to think about if you're not the only one watching.

I'm only aware of one device that has attempted to address this - that is the Murideo Prisma LUT box. There is some information about it here:
It's an obsolete product now.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for that info. I think your first remark makes sense. I’ll go with that.
 

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I have this Deuteranopia condition. I am planning on having several projectors calibrated by an ISF professional. The question is: Is it necessary for him to adjust the calibration to fit my vision problem in order for me to see a proper image?
If you have deuteranopia, then essentially your spectral sensitivities are the same as a normal observer, except for the M cone response which will be identical to the L cones.

So if you want to see images on your display the same way you see images in the real world, then calibrating it in the standard way is what you want.

If in fact you have a degree of deuteranomoly (which is actually the most common type of color deficiency in males), then the answer is more difficult. This is because the way the displays primary spectra interact with your spectral sensitivities won't be well captured by the standard observer assumption made in normal color measurement, AND you theoretically have the option of compensating to some degree for the deuteranomaly, i.e. letting you experience a sensation closer to what a normal observer experiences, by calibrating in a way that exaggerates the L-M differences in the image. Note that this isn't what you are used to seeing though.

To address the second possibility in an accurate scientific fashion isn't really feasible with current technology though, since there needs to be a way of conveniently measuring your individual spectral sensitivities, and then being able to plug them into the calibration setup. The latter is the less technically challenging of the two.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Holy cow! I think I want to be born again but this time with normal color eyes!
 

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Holy cow! I think I want to be born again but this time with normal color eyes!
There's a bunch of research into making genetic changes to cells in the retina to repair various vision anomolies, but whether the fruits of that research are 5 or 50 years away from practical use is impossible to tell....
 
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