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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I apologize in advance as I know this topic has been discussed heavily in other threads. Though it seems as though all the information I could find pertained specifically to a certain receiver or other piece of hardware.


Also, just as a forewarning, I am terribly out of touch with the technical aspect of audio setups. Despite all the research/reading I've done it's just been a subject that I've never quite been able to wrap my head around. So bear with me



Ok, so I've recently upgraded to a Samsung ln55c630 and a bdc5500 BR player and have found that while watching BR movies the volume fluctuates so drastically that I find it almost impossible to watch. For example, while watching the Lord of the Rings the dialogue will be basically inaudible where as the action scenes are deafening at times.


From what I understand this the way the audio was intended to be played and that it has everything to do with dynamic range control. This problem seems to be easily resolved if you are using some kind of receiver or external setup. However, I am having this issue while outputting only through the TV speakers.


Playing with the built in equalizer has had little effect and the difference is honestly very difficult to discern.


Maybe I have missed some feature or setting in the menu ? Can this problem be solved without upgrading to aftermarket sound equipment ?


Also, for what it's worth this was never a problem with my Westinghouse LCDTV and PS3. I assume it has something to do with the new BR player or the better speaker on the Samsung ?


Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated!
 

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Did you try the auto volume leveler feature? It is designed to level off TV commercials so the volume spikes are killed off. That is really the only thing I see on the TV side. I have no idea if it would do what you need.


I really think you should look into a 5.1 surround system. For the amount of money you have invested in your PQ, you are really missing a huge part of the movie watching experience by only using TV speakers (which are terrible in flat screens). You could always start with a good 2.0 or 2.1 system and add the other speakers when more money comes along. A good stereo setup would be a huge improvement over the TV speakers. The Speakers and Amps, Receiver forum can be extremely useful for getting a lot for you money.


Good luck!
 

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I don't know that particular player, but how is it setup? It should be outputting stereo, and if there are dynamic range controls available, turn those on and it should help.


Otherwise get yourself a real audio system...
 

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What happens if you play a DVD or BD movie/TV show with a dedicated stereo track? If the dedicated stereo track sounds right, then the problem is likely the way your player is downmixing the multichannel soundtrack for stereo playback by your TV.


Your player should have a Dynamic Range Control setting that can be helpful in your situation. Give that a try, although DRC only works with Dolby tracks, not DTS. Also look at the stereo downmix settings on your player. You want a standard stereo output, not one that is surround encoded. And, check to make sure your TV doesn't have any fake surround modes engaged.


btw, movies are not mixed so that dialog is overhelmed by effects audio. In most cases dialog will be audible in both multichannel and stereo playback.
 

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Quote:
movies are not mixed so that dialog is overhelmed by effects audio.
True fact. The people speaking that dialog are paid enormous sums of money to say what they say ... not very likely the director wants that expensive dialog over run or non-intelligible.
 

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Many good points, however;


It's likely the TV and it's near-field environment is a contributing factor to this as well.


The excitation and resonances of the plastic shell of the TV, emanating both forward sound off the driver, but a collage of unintended sound from both the back-wave and structural excitation of the plastic. All this is likely in an hostile environment wrt near-field reflections, resulting in a phasey, comb filtered, unintelligible mess.


I helped my mom out with a similar problem. A desktop TV, whereby she does her primary viewing, the sound was total mush. I hooked her up, but the cool thing for me was her discriminating taste, and knowing the sound should be clearer and turning to me for help. Very cool.


Some TVs have decent on board speaker systems, the vast majority do not. The video engineer that threw the speakers in that cabinet, never intended for Dennis Erskine to be involved in an attempt to delineate a little more intelligibility out of the speaker system
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for all the help guys, definitely starting to get somewhere now!

Quote:
Originally Posted by mbyrnes /forum/post/19615807


Did you try the auto volume leveler feature? It is designed to level off TV commercials so the volume spikes are killed off. That is really the only thing I see on the TV side. I have no idea if it would do what you need.


I really think you should look into a 5.1 surround system. For the amount of money you have invested in your PQ, you are really missing a huge part of the movie watching experience by only using TV speakers (which are terrible in flat screens). You could always start with a good 2.0 or 2.1 system and add the other speakers when more money comes along. A good stereo setup would be a huge improvement over the TV speakers. The Speakers and Amps, Receiver forum can be extremely useful for getting a lot for you money.


Good luck!

I actually did try the auto volume feature but it had little to no effect. I do like the idea of starting off with a nice receiver for a 2.1 setup and working my way up though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisWiggles /forum/post/19617411


I don't know that particular player, but how is it setup? It should be outputting stereo, and if there are dynamic range controls available, turn those on and it should help.


Otherwise get yourself a real audio system...

Bingo!


Did a little digging through the player setting and turning DRC on (which I was not aware was an option on this player) made a great deal of difference. I guess I had confused this feature with being available only on higher end receivers. That goes to show how clueless I am with audio


Quote:
Originally Posted by BIslander /forum/post/19617793


What happens if you play a DVD or BD movie/TV show with a dedicated stereo track? If the dedicated stereo track sounds right, then the problem is likely the way your player is downmixing the multichannel soundtrack for stereo playback by your TV.


Your player should have a Dynamic Range Control setting that can be helpful in your situation. Give that a try, although DRC only works with Dolby tracks, not DTS. Also look at the stereo downmix settings on your player. You want a standard stereo output, not one that is surround encoded. And, check to make sure your TV doesn't have any fake surround modes engaged.


btw, movies are not mixed so that dialog is overhelmed by effects audio. In most cases dialog will be audible in both multichannel and stereo playback.

Turning DRC on really made a big difference. The Simulated surround sound features have also always been turned off. But would you be able to give an example of something that uses a dedicated stereo track? I'm not entirely sure what would qualify.


The problem with the dialogue being too soft was a direct result of having to turn down the volume to compensate for the action scenes. Which at times was way too loud for my apartment.




Quote:
Originally Posted by FOH /forum/post/19619217


Many good points, however;


It's likely the TV and it's near-field environment is a contributing factor to this as well.


The excitation and resonances of the plastic shell of the TV, emanating both forward sound off the driver, but a collage of unintended sound from both the back-wave and structural excitation of the plastic. All this is likely in an hostile environment wrt near-field reflections, resulting in a phasey, comb filtered, unintelligible mess.


I helped my mom out with a similar problem. A desktop TV, whereby she does her primary viewing, the sound was total mush. I hooked her up, but the cool thing for me was her discriminating taste, and knowing the sound should be clearer and turning to me for help. Very cool.


Some TVs have decent on board speaker systems, the vast majority do not. The video engineer that threw the speakers in that cabinet, never intended for Dennis Erskine to be involved in an attempt to delineate a little more intelligibility out of the speaker system

While I'm sure that plays into my problem to some extent, the problem lies almost exclusively when viewing action movies through the BR player. Cable tv, video games etc. have been fine.
 

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Quote:
I don't know that particular player, but how is it setup? It should be outputting stereo, and if there are dynamic range controls available, turn those on and it should help.


Otherwise get yourself a real audio system...

Bingo!


Did a little digging through the player setting and turning DRC on (which I was not aware was an option on this player) made a great deal of difference. I guess I had confused this feature with being available only on higher end receivers. That goes to show how clueless I am with audio

I'm glad that helped out. There certainly are more advanced DRC options out there in receivers, like Dolby Volume, Audyssey Dynamic Volume, etc.


Ideally you wouldn't need any dynamic range compression features, but movie soundtracks are mixed for enormous dynamic range, which is intended to be played back in well-treated acoustically dampened rooms with large arrays of powerful speakers. When you move away from that to TV speakers in a bright and reflective living room, dialogue intelligibility gets bad regardless of dynamic range, and and when things get really loud it sounds bad and so you end up turning down the volume and you can't hear what anyone is saying. So DRC doesn't solve the problem fundamentally, because it doesn't fix your room and speakers, but obviously it helps you enjoy the movie on your TV because you want to be able to hear what's going on!


And you shouldn't feel bad, I mean I have a $10K audio system alone in a treated dedicated theater room, and even it has its weaknesses sometimes when I'm not listening at full-blast volume.


Anyway, glad you found that feature on your BD player, it's actually fairly common on a lot of stuff. You may also want to check your TV box, because there are a lot of DRC control options on that usually, and often they default to on, which may be why you don't hear as much problems with that, in addition to the fact that a lot of shows and movies are already DR compressed for broadcast. Usually the problem with TV is more really obnoxiously loud commercials rather than program dynamic range extremes.
 
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