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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all.


I've been listening to a lot more 2 channel music lately due to a speaker upgrade that makes 2 channel worthwhile again.


I have noticed quite a difference in sound quality when moving back and forth between the optical and the analog connections. Until recently I only used this player (Denon 2910) for multichannel music using the analog outs, but now with 2 channel, I started out using the optical since it was designated "CD" on my receiver, but when I instead use the multichannel analog outs, the music is clearly more defined, and fuller.


Why is this? Is it due to the receiver or to the CDP? The receiver - Yamaha 5990, does not add any DSP or other processing to the analog inputs, so my subs are in effect turned off, yet even in pure direct mode when the optical inputs are also similarly handled, the analog connections still yield a superior sound. This makes me think it in the CDP, but what? I can't quite figure it out. I have "source direct" enabled in the CDP, so I thought all bass mgmt tasks were disabled there, too, as well as speaker size and delay settings.


Either way - the analogs sound better, way better. I'd just like to have an inkling why. Thanks.
 

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If your bass management settings are the same, it could be for a few different reasons.


1. The Digital to Analog Converter (DAC) in your Denon are better than the one in your Yamaha receiver.


2. If you are listening to SACD or DVD-Audio, you can't get the high resolution output from the optical output, only the analog output.
 

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Are you listening at the same level? Not with the same volume control setting but at the same SPL? Small but detectable changes in volume often change our impression of the sound quality.


Does your DVD player have any additional processing, such as ReEQ engaged?


If the actual volume is equal, it is not inconceivable that the analog input circuit has a different response curve. If your ears are better than mine you might be able to detect that with test tones.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by trekguy /forum/post/0


Are you listening at the same level? Not with the same volume control setting but at the same SPL? Small but detectable changes in volume often change our impression of the sound quality.


Does your DVD player have any additional processing, such as ReEQ engaged?


If the actual volume is equal, it is not inconceivable that the analog input circuit has a different response curve. If your ears are better than mine you might be able to detect that with test tones.

I had not read your note till this morning, but last night I had the same thought, sort of "I wonder if it is simply volume related?".


So I experimented with the SPL, and Mrs. Schwingding to keep me honest. She ran the controls, I had on a blindfold.


With SPL equalized volumes, I could easily detect the difference, every time. The analog path presented a much larger soundstage, while the toslink connection put the soundfield in the middle of the speakers, not quite mono, by any means, but much more in-between the speakers than all around.


Funky, huh?
 
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