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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm going to be redoing my entire home theater. All new. The only pieces I'll be keeping are my ReplayTVs (and possibly a Tivo). Both use S-Video.


I want a large screen - at least 40", possibly 60", if I can even bigger.


My sources will be exclusively DVD, cable, or PVR (ReplayTV or Tivo).


Do I gain anything by choosing a DVD player with a VGA out, and a TV with a VGA input, over a standard DVD player and TV using S-Video? Forgive my ignorance http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/smile.gif



Previously I started this thread: http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/Forum11/HTML/015714.html
 

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Quality tree from worst to best:


RF connection > Composite Video > S Video > Component video > Digital connection (1394 or DVI)


Use component video where ever possible. HDTV is exclusively component video. Component video can be in two forms. YpBpR and RGBhv (VGA). They both produce the same quality. YpBpR is perferred as it in only requires three cable and easier to extend to longer distances than a VGA cable.

Some commercial projectors in very high end HT systems use RGB&sync over 4 cables.


Svideo is a compromise between composite video and component. In Svideo, the chroma is seperated from the luminance or black and white signal. VHS and SVHS process split the signals internally anyway so here Svideo offers the advantage of not having to split or re-combine the two. DVD and DBS are component in nature so here Svideo offers an advantage over composite. However a lot of signal loss occurs when the RGB is made into the chroma signal either composite or Svideo. The difference between composite and Svideo is margional. The jump to component is much larger.


So make sure your TV has component inputs and the DVD player has them as well. I have never heard of a DVD player with VGA out not counting a computer with DVD player software. Just make sure the TV has YpBpR. It may have VGA as well but for DVD it must have YpBpR. Some manufactures use the term YcBcR. this is the same thing but usally denotes standard definition versus HDTV.


For a little more money you can get DVD players and TVs that will operate in 480P mode. This is "low end" HDTV but looks very good. The biggest advantage of progressive DVD is lack of scan lines.

 
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