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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Besides the fact that one is LCD and one is LED. The price differences is ~1k. There has to be something cool about the 8500.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by syzygylock /forum/post/18256876


Besides the fact that one is LCD and one is LED. The price differences is ~1k. There has to be something cool about the 8500.

Actually, they are both LCDs.


The 750 is an LCD illuminated by CCFL.


The 8500 is an LCD that is back-lit by LEDs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yes, I did check, but the comparison charts make no sense. I was asking why is it so much more expensive.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by syzygylock /forum/post/18257316


Yes, I did check, but the comparison charts make no sense. I was asking why is it so much more expensive.

Because a few flourescent tubes are a heck of a lot cheaper than LEDs. The 8500 is LED backlit with local dimming. See below...


How LED technology is used in LCD TVs

Edge lighting


Edge lighting is pretty much as described. In this method, a series of LED backlights are positioned along the outside edges of the screen. From there, the light is dispersed across the screen, which means the LED/LCD TV can be made very thin. And while the results may be better than CCFL screens, the black levels in edge lighting are not as deep and, if you look closely, the edge area of the screen tends to be brighter than the middle viewing area.


Full-array backlighting

To take full advantage of LED lighting, some manufacturers use full-array LED backlighting, where many rows of LEDs are placed behind the entire surface of the screen. Although this makes for a thicker TV panel, the LEDs provide more even, brighter colors and greater contrast. A measurable benefit of full-array lighting can be seen when "local dimming" is utilized, meaning that each LED (or more common, a selected “zone” of LEDs) can be turned on and off independently within the screen, thus providing greater control of the brightness and darkness for each of those areas. Greater contrast levels are achieved by diminishing the effects of light from brightly lit neighboring areas seeping into blackened areas of the screen, which is one of the downsides of LCD screens.


In other words, the greater level of dimming control, the better the picture quality.


Speaking of quality, currently, most LED backlighting is provided by white LEDs that are plentiful and cost less than their red, green, blue (RGB) cousins. But as popularity and demand increase, and research continues to improve, expect to see RGB LEDs, that provide a much greater color gamut and therefore much richer, denser and varied colors, being incorporated into TVs. Already a couple of manufacturers including Sony and Sharp have models with RGB LEDs.


Features of LED backlit LCD TVs

•An LED TV achieves deeper blacks as well as emitting brighter images, thereby producing better contrast ratios;

•They are slimmer (especially edge-LED lighting systems);

•They deliver better viewing angles than other LCD TVs;

•LEDs are long-lasting;

•LEDs are more energy efficient than their CCFL counterparts, and better than plasma Tvs and much better than CRTs;

•LEDs don’t use mercury like some other backlighting methods.
 
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