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I am using a JBL DSC1000 receiver. I currently have my HTPC connected to it via coaxial digital audio. I have, however, had the same problem playing audio from all sources through the digital audio inputs.


When I am playing audio to the receiver via a digital audio connection, it plays fine for a while and I get excellent sound. After a while though, a slight crackling noise appears in the audio which, over the course of 10 - 20 seconds grows to be a lot worse. The audio then cuts out completely for a couple of seconds, and when it comes back the crackling is gone and the audio is back to normal. This happens regularly, say every 10 minutes for example. The time between instances is different depending on the piece of equipment I am using as a source.


Thats the best description I can give I'm afraid, but it is REALLY annoying and really makes my whole setup a pain in the ass to use. Have any of you experienced this phenomenon before? If so is there a way around it without any serious implications? Or do I just have a flawed receiver?


This is driving me crazy anyway, and I would really appreciate any input any of you might have on this problem.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by P Zero /forum/post/0


I am using a JBL DSC1000 receiver. I currently have my HTPC connected to it via coaxial digital audio. I have, however, had the same problem playing audio from all sources through the digital audio inputs.


When I am playing audio to the receiver via a digital audio connection, it plays fine for a while and I get excellent sound. After a while though, a slight crackling noise appears in the audio which, over the course of 10 - 20 seconds grows to be a lot worse. The audio then cuts out completely for a couple of seconds, and when it comes back the crackling is gone and the audio is back to normal. This happens regularly, say every 10 minutes for example. The time between instances is different depending on the piece of equipment I am using as a source.


Thats the best description I can give I'm afraid, but it is REALLY annoying and really makes my whole setup a pain in the ass to use. Have any of you experienced this phenomenon before? If so is there a way around it without any serious implications? Or do I just have a flawed receiver?


This is driving me crazy anyway, and I would really appreciate any input any of you might have on this problem.

You say you are getting this on the coax digital audio inputs.


Does it also happen when you use an optical digital audio input?


If so, I think it is likely your receiver is faulty.

--Bob
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by P Zero /forum/post/0


This happens through both optical and coaxial inputs. I am beginning to think my receiver is faulty.

It is just barely possible that you have a ground loop which is giving your receiver fits on its digital audio processing circuit. A ground loop is power that travels between devices along the shields of the cables connecting them. There are lots of ways for this power to get into the setup, but the most common is via the cable TV feed line. The most common symptom of a ground loop is 60 Hz hum from your speakers -- particularly from a subwoofer.


It is also possible that you have a short on some input or output that is causing problems. The receiver's protective circuitry may not be activating properly.


Try this:


Disconnect EVERYTHING from your receiver. Take the receiver to a different room -- to be on a different power circuit.


Connect ONE source device to the receiver via OPTICAL digital audio cable ONLY. No other cables of any sort. The optical cable provides no path for electricity to travel between the source and the receiver. If your receiver has a headphone jack, use that one to listen to it (no speakers), otherwise connect a couple small speakers to listen. Be very careful that the speaker connections are not shorted at either end. Even one hair of loose wire is enough to short things.


Power on the receiver and source device. If your receiver's owners' manual has a procedure for restoring the receiver to Factory Default settings, do that now. Then manually re-enter the bare minimum settings to listen to your one source via the optical digital audio connection.


Now play music and see if the crackling re-appears. If it does, then your receiver needs service.


If it doesn't then start restoring your initial setup a piece at a time until the problem re-appears, so as to isolate where the problem is coming from.

--Bob
 

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I have a 20 year old 60 CD changer which plays CD, MP3 discs & cassette tapes.
The player has a optical digital output port and a 3.5mm headphone jack.

When I connect the digital optical cable to my Yamaha AVR, here’s the output:
CD audio comes through the yamaha
Cassette audio does not come through the Yamaha (I guess because cassette is analog audio and not digital audio).
MP3 audio does not come through the Yamaha - this I am surprised - MP3 is digital audio.

When I connect the CD player to the Yamaha via 3.5mm - 2 RCA cable, all 3 formats play on the Yamaha.

Any idea why MP3 audio does not flow through the digital optical cable?
 
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