AVS Forum banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,211 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,


I just purchased a Philips DVP5982 upconverting DVD player and will hook it up via HDMI to my TV (a Samsung 1080P DLP - not purchased yet) and will need to hook up the audio to my receiver (Onkyo TX-SR800). Since this receiver does not have HDMI, I figure I will need to hook up a digital coax to it. I didn't realize the philips didn't have optical out on it, which is what all my cables are, and I figure I can't just hook the HDMI to the tv and then the optical out on the tv to the receiver, correct (as a type of passthrough)?


My main question would be: can I use any coax cable when connecting up the dvd player to the receiver? I did so and my receiver shows DD and DTS in the appropriate movies, but I want to know if I am losing anything as compared to having an actual digital coax cable.


What would be everyones recommendation in regards to this?


Thanks!

Mike
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
20,735 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by AV Doogie /forum/post/0


Any decent coaxial cable will work fine...you won't miss anything as long as it has the proper impedance.

Yes, and just to clarify, the proper impedance is 75ohm. Any 75ohm coax should suffice, which would include any cable labeled as: 75ohm, video, or digital. Note that analog audio cables may or may not be 75ohm. A cable that's the wrong impedance may work fine, or you could get dropout problems. In any case 75ohm coax is dirt cheap, so no reason not to get the right cable for the task.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,211 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the responses!

If I have a high quality audio rca hooked up and sound is coming through without any audible drop-outs, am I ok?

I will post this in the dvd player thread, but I am concerned about getting the proper connection as I cannot select digital audio in the dvd menu. Kinda strange, though my receiver has brought up digital in its screen, inc. discrete 6.1 when I popped in Lord of the Rings.

Any thoughts on that?

Thanks!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,646 Posts

Quote:
Out of curiosity, what is the minimum OHM recommended for audio?

What do you mean?


Are you asking what characteristic impedance an audio cable should be? It doesn't matter. Audio signals are no longer impedance matched, therefore, matching the cables impedance to the source and load is unnecessary.

Modern audio systems bridge the low impedance source with a high impedance load.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,365 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by dman918 /forum/post/0


Thanks for the responses!

If I have a high quality audio rca hooked up and sound is coming through without any audible drop-outs, am I ok?

I will post this in the dvd player thread, but I am concerned about getting the proper connection as I cannot select digital audio in the dvd menu. Kinda strange, though my receiver has brought up digital in its screen, inc. discrete 6.1 when I popped in Lord of the Rings.

Any thoughts on that?

Thanks!


Your fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
175 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by dman918 /forum/post/0


Hi,


My main question would be: can I use any coax cable when connecting up the dvd player to the receiver? I did so and my receiver shows DD and DTS in the appropriate movies, but I want to know if I am losing anything as compared to having an actual digital coax cable.


What would be everyones recommendation in regards to this?


Thanks!

Mike

I once used a, dare to say, decent quality (monster) RCA cable for my DVD digital coax cable. It sounded fine, however every time I turned on the fan in the laundry room the audio would "cut out". I switched to a digital cable, and it was no longer an issue. Looking back now, the analog cable may not have been the correct impedence perhaps and I'm curious what the ohm was now...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,896 Posts
OK, just a little general information and terminology to help. This is not meant to step on anyones toes but more of a help to some of the new guys getting exposed to Coaxial cables and the terminology that goes with them.


Coaxial cables have a center conductor and a shield surrounding them. Plain old RCA audio cables have that same center conductor and a shield. The difference is that the dielectric and the spacing between the center conductor and shield are tightly controlled on a coaxial cable. That coaxial cable is actually a transmission line and it has a characteristic impedance that is determined by the gauge of the center conductor, the distance to the shield and the dielectric properties of the insulator separating the two. That impedance is given in ohms. Since it is a characteristic impedance, you cannot take an ohmmeter or a DVM and measure that impedance, it takes a more sophisticated instrument like a Vector Network Analyzer or a TDR (Time Domain Reflectometer) to be able to measure that impedance. Coaxial transmission lines are used for RF signals and also for many digital signals because the signal can then be transmitted down the cable with high integrity. With a digital signal the key thing is accurately recovering all of the ones and zeros sent down the line. Changes in impedance or poor connections can cause reflections on the line which can give data errors. With a digital signal, the output impedance of the driver and the input impedance of the receiver as well as the coaxial cable are all 75 ohms to minimize reflections. With a simple analog audio signal this is not critical. There are no bits to be lost. The audio preamplifier has an output impedance that is low and the input impedance of the power amplifier is high. The cable is really a don't care. This is a pretty basic explanation whereas there are really more factors involved.


So, to properly ask your question, you would ask. What impedance cable should I use for the coax digital audio connection? Or, what kind of cable should I use for a digital audio connection? You would not ask, What ohm cable should I use? (technically not the way to ask the question.

As a side note, a number of people do use 75 ohm coaxial cable for their equipment interconnects. Nothing wrong with that. It is typically a rugged high quality inexpensive cable. The fact that it is a 75 ohm cable again is a don't care to the analog audio connections.

Hope this helps.


...Doyle
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,874 Posts
Yes... posts 2 and 3 addressed the question. with the simple answer. Thank you.


I was making reference to Post 10 and what may be forthcoming. Why do you question?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,874 Posts
I didn't make the comment in disagreement.

I made the comment with an expectation that "someone" would.


Poor attempt at sarcasm I guess...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,854 Posts
I liked post #10.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,896 Posts
When you finally hit the send button and the post shows up, you do sort of realize how many words you just used. I tend to read if over and then go back and add where I think more clarification might be needed. Just trying to put the cookies on the bottom shelf.


It was almost ironic that my Microwave Cable vendor showed up this morning and we had some long dialog about failures we were seeing in the 26 GHz cables that we were buying from them. At this point we are not sure whether it is connector oriented or strands moving in the cable during flexure. At those frequencies everything is critical.


..Doyle
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
286 Posts
To the OP,


If you're interested in Onkyo, the new Onkyo line up are all HDMI 1.3 capable of decoding the HD-DVD and BD lossy and lossless audio codecs (with video switching). This starts with their entry level model at $379 through their top-of-the-line. Also, their mid to hi end level AVR's can upconvert to 1080P via HDMI so depending on your budget, you might want to get one of the entry level models or wait a month and get one of the higher end models.


Just FYI.


HRG
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,211 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by hotrodguy /forum/post/0


To the OP,


If you're interested in Onkyo, the new Onkyo line up are all HDMI 1.3 capable of decoding the HD-DVD and BD lossy and lossless audio codecs (with video switching). This starts with their entry level model at $379 through their top-of-the-line. Also, their mid to hi end level AVR's can upconvert to 1080P via HDMI so depending on your budget, you might want to get one of the entry level models or wait a month and get one of the higher end models.


Just FYI.


HRG

Thanks for the heads up. I plan on sticking with what I have for now. I can deal with digital coax and just hook up via HDMI directly to the tv. My receiver seems to have just about everything I could possibly want, other than the HDMI.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top