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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Friends,


I have read the lengthy thread "was 16*9 a mistake ?" and found it to be very educational for this newbie.


But it all seemed geared to RPTV and FPTV... big screen TVs. I am looking for a direct view set in the 32-34" size.. ala Panasonic CT32HX41 (~$1700) or CT34WX50 (~$3500) due to space limitations.


After reading that thread, I am inclined towards the 4:3 set for these reasons:

1) this will be a dual use HT/casual view setup

2) I have only NTSC experience... no DVDs... yet

3) I have VHS, SVHS, cable, and DBS (Echostar)

4) Even if I get the 16:9 set, I'd still hafta fork over big $$ for a STB in order to watch HDTV.. and don't even know if it's avialable in my area yet (if I understand correctly)


Also,I figure the 16:9 sets will be dramatically reduced in price 5 years down the road when the HDTV format is supposed to be fully implemented... and I'd still have a useable 4:3 set for secondary usage. ;-)


Some things I don't understand:

What is PQ?

Do DV sets have selectable squeeze? How can I tell?

How do I tell a good line doubler from a bad one?

I have no clue what 480i/480p/720p/1080i have to do with 4:3 and 16:9, etc.
http://www.cavecreations.com/tv2.cgi

tells me that of the above 2 sets I mentioned:


the 32" 4:3 set gives me (vs 34" 16:9 set): (diagonal)


full 32" in NTSC mode (vs 27.8" on the 16:9 set)

29.4" in 16:9 mode (vs full 34" of the 16:9 set)

29.1" in 1.85:1 mode (vs 33.6 for the 16:9 set)

27.8" in 2.35:1 mode (vs 32.2" for the 16:9 set)


Since I have no experience with DVD or HDef, I cannot begin to project my anticipated usage of 16:9 material. I'd guess the majority would be 4:3 material until forced to move to 16:9 (if ever). http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/wink.gif


However, I would like to have the capability to enjoy anamorphic DVDs and concerts... but again... no idea how often we'll use that... until we jump on this technology.


So are the arguments I've read applicable to direct view sets too?


Thanks for all the good info in that thread! I know you folks get tired of discussing it.. but it sure helps expand the knowledge base for newbies like me.




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--speedy
 

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Speedy:


You've chewed off quite a bit. My advice would be to look around this forum, search the archives, and check out some general web sites like www.hdgalaxy.com, www.twice.com and www.hdpictures.com, to name a few. At least that'll get you started.


In order to make any reasonable decisions, and that's a lot tougher than you think, you really need to methodically research this stuff and decide what's best for your particular situation.


Once you get to the point of being comfortable with understanding the basics, you'll probably want to base your purchase decision on the specifications of the sets and/or monitors.


That's when you'll find out the companies do NOT publish the important specifications.


It is very likely you will start out thinking of going in one direction and end up going in a completely different direction.


No matter what, though, you absolutely, positively, have got to see a quality HD and DVD image on a well adjusted 16:9 set and/or monitor before you make a purchase decision.


In my opinion, if you are able to get over the air HD, I think the best quality bang for the buck combination would be the Sampo 16:9 HD direct view ($2700), the panasonic STB ($950)and the JVC progressive scan DVD player ($379).


But, as soon as you say that, you realize there are really great sets out there for $300, too.


Heck, half the fun is doing all the research, anyway. Good luck and happy hunting.


Text
 

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Ok, here's a potential shocker for all the 16/9 vs 4/3 thread followers: I am solidly behind selecting 16:9 direct-view sets over 4/3 models. Here's why.

With direct view sets, the resolution is pretty much limited by the perforated or striped screen that the CRTs focus through. If you select a 4:3 set, you will definitely suffer reduced resolution when viewing 16:9 or narrower material. I'm not dissing owners of 4:3 sets; everyone makes their decisions for themselves. It's just that, unlike squeezable 4:3 RPTV sets, there IS a limiting factor for resolution that WILL mean that 16:9 images are using less than the sets full capability.

I have checked out many direct view sets in the past few weeks, and have been very favorably impressed with the following models, in this order: Sony 34 inch HD set (by far the best picture, but also the most expensive); Panasonic Tau 34 inch (a great picture for the price); Sharp 34 inch (almost as good as the Tau); RCA 38 inch (was showing 480P/540P, not HD, but shows promise; appears to have an unpleasant overall brownish tint).

I also saw a 50 inch DLP set (Toshiba?) that had the sharpest image I've seen yet, but appeared to suffer from reduced overall contrast and less than great blacks.

Anyway, my two cents: get a 16:9 if it's a direct view.

John in VA
 

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1.) PQ means Picture Quality.

2.) Some 4:3 RPTVs have selectable squeeze, like Sony HS10.Others can be tweaked into doing it (like Toshiba or Panasonic). Check the many discussion groups to find out which.

3.) To see a good line doubler, look at the Panasonic Elite RPTVs playing a DVD (can't always tell easily with crappy source material). Then compare to the other RPTVs.

4.) Aspect ratios can be independent of signal resolution. You can watch a 4:3 aspect 480i signal upconverted to 1080i. You can also see a 480p widescreen (16:9) signal in native resolution (480p), or upconverted to 1080i, etc. Typically however, 1080i native signals are broadcast 16:9. 480i native signals are typically broadcast 4:3.


Don't use your current watching habits to predict your future behavior. E.g., once you start watching anamorphic DVDs on your new HDTV-capable set, 4:3 DVDs and regular TV might start looking more and more crappy, to the point that you could turn-off to "regular TV" altogether. That's what happened to me. So now I'm an HDTV and DVD junkie, and it's an expensive habit, sigh.


I agree with the other posts: invest some time watching the different sets, with anamorphic DVD and both low and high resolution HDTV signals, before you decide. Don't make your selection going by the crappy NTSC signals most electronic stores "demo" these sets with. It's a big purchase and you'll be living with it for a couple years at least; what's a couple hours for up-front investigation?


Don
 

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I'm another 4:3+squeeze HD RPTV advocate who would advise 16:9 for direct view. Many 4:3 sets do have a selectable or automatic 16:9 squeeze. The problem with 4:3+squeeze direct view sets is that the resolution of almost all direct view sets stinks due to the shadow mask, and the manufacturers cannot optimize the shadow mask for both 4:3 and 16:9. Unfortunately, 16:9 direct view sets cost an astronomical amount, so you may still need to consider either a 4:3 direct view or a 4:3 or 16:9 RPTV.


One aforementioned 16:9 direct view set that's pretty nice is the Sampo SME-34WHD5. It has a 34" 16:9 picture with low resolution and no line doubling for the low, low price of $3000. It's still pretty cool for use with a HTPC.


One 4:3 direct view set that's an affordable option is the RCA MM36110 for $1700. It has a 36" 4:3 display that will produce a 33" 16:9 picture. It lacks a 16:9 squeeze, but here is what you do: Manually squeeze the 1080i mode via the service menu, and use a Home Theater PC (HTPC) to pump in 800x600 @ 60 Hz nonanamorphic for your DVD's (and line doubled 480i TV.) 600p nonanamorphic is roughly equal to 480p anamorphic, and you'll get a much better picture from your HTPC than any progressive DVD player. This set will also do 480p at 72 Hz, which has its advantages. The resolution of this set is again disappointing, probably doubly so for HDTV, but its resolution is still better than the Sony 36XBR400. There are also some similar cheap Sampo 4:3 sets.


Most HD RPTV's will produce bigger and higher resolution 16:9 pictures than these direct view sets. If you haven't seen a HD RPTV, you better before you decide on a direct view. The main disadvantage of an RPTV is that it cannot compete with sunlight.


If you find a 4:3 set that can produce a 16:9 picture bigger and better than any 16:9 set in your price range, then ignore the 16:9 form factor fanatics. Slap some mattes on there if you want to frame the widescreen picture.



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Abdul

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
>>jeff43<<

>> www.hdgalaxy.com, www.twice.com and www.hdpictures.com<<


I checked the last 2 sites. Best info came from hdpictures! HDgalaxy site could not be found.


In my area, HD broadcasts are not scheduled to begin until the end of 2002. So it would seem pointless to get an STB right now.


>>you absolutely, positively, have got to see a quality HD and DVD image on a well adjusted 16:9 set and/or monitor before you make a purchase decision<<


I have seen... and my pocketbook and budget are already running for cover. http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/wink.gif



>>gnosys<<

>>With direct view sets, the resolution is pretty much limited by the perforated or striped screen that the CRTs focus through.<<


Hmm. That doesn't bode well for my 4:3 HDTV plan.


>>50 inch DLP set<<


I don't know what DLP means. Can you define?


My space restrictions center around a 35" (wide) opening in my armoire. Ergo the DV vs RPTV restrictions. I don't think the Sony sets will fit in that area.


I don't know about Toshiba, Sharp, Samsung, and other DV sets... feature or sizewise.



>>dtycholis<<

Thanks for the definitions.


>>you could turn-off to "regular TV" altogether.<<


Well, I know that for the next coupla years, I have *no* choice but SDTV. HDTV broadcasts are not scheduled until the end of 2002 in my area.


>>what's a couple hours for up-front investigation?<<


Coupla hours? Hah! I spent that much time reading the huge thread on 16*9!!! (and going to the various links suggested there)


Fortunately, I have RoadRunner so I am limited only by how fast I can read and comprehend! (slow) http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/wink.gif



>>Abdul Jalib<<

>>The problem with 4:3+squeeze direct view sets is that the resolution of almost all direct view sets stinks due to the shadow mask, and the manufacturers cannot optimize the shadow mask for both 4:3 and 16:9.<<


Rats. Further shooting holes in my economic attempt to gain a HD set.


>> Many 4:3 sets do have a selectable or automatic 16:9 squeeze<<


I think the 32hx40 has an automatic squeeze. I dunno about the -41 version.


>>16:9 direct view sets cost an astronomical amount, so you may still need to consider either a 4:3 direct view or a 4:3 or 16:9 RPTV<<


I don't see a 16:9 RPTV fitting in my armoire... and the 16:9 sets definitely strain... no, that's too mild... BLOW the budget. :/


And... it appears my original budget is spent on speakers, receiver and DVD player... without even getting to the TV part!


Somebody said this is an expensive hobby. No kidding!


>>If you haven't seen a HD RPTV, you better before you decide on a direct view.<<


I wish that were an option. Maybe if I can talk my spousal unit into selling the armoire... http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/wink.gif




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--speedy
 

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Here's more info then you ever wanted. But maybe someome eles can use it.


http://www.avsforum.com – A Home Theater Forum that has an excellent HDTV Hardware, Programming and Recording sections http://www.hdtvgalaxy.com/ - great place to find out what is televised in HDTV, good general information http://www.titantv.com/ - great place to find local DTV channels available in your area as well as great help for selecting an antenna
http://www.ilovehdtv.com/hdtvforum/menu.html http://hdtvinsider.com/ - HDTV newsletter which appears in The Perfect Vision Magazine
http://www.copperbox.com/ - HDTV STB http://www.howstuffworks.com/hdtv.htm - how it works, good overview, great links http://www.cnet.com/electronics/0-3622-7-2643589.html - Consumer Reports--HDTV Guide http://home.cnet.com/electronics/0-3...4926010-1.html – CNET’s HDTV explained article http://www.wral.com/digital/info/faq.html - good FAQ, nice site that demonstrates that there's a good amount of HD content out there right now on CBS http://www.princeton.edu/~conorneu/hdtv/hdtv.html - good site from a college student project. Not the most current but covers the basics well. Good introductory content
http://www.ptvdigital.org/ - public television DTV web site http://www.pbs.org/opb/crashcourse/ - simple overview of HDTV http://www.hdtvbuyer.com/Htm/HomeSet4.htm - video professional site, good pro perspective, news, links, etc http://www.ce.org/pdf/dtv_guide_current_issue.pdf http://www.hdpictures.com/ - HDTV info center (on of the best resource sites) http://www.teleport.com/~samc/hdtv/ - Sam’s Digital Television Report http://www.twice.com/DTVcharts/1080mon.html – loads of info on most HDTV monitors currently on the market http://dtv720p.com/ - programming info for ABC HDTV broadcast http://www.widescreen.org/ - The Letterbox/Widescreen (and Open DVD) Advocacy Page http://www.mgm.com/mgmhv/letterbox/ - Letterboxing http://www.dtvmax.com/ - DTV and HDTV news site http://www.dtvmax.com/dtv.htm http://216.168.63.180/hdtv/hdtvnews1.html - good newsletter site http://216.168.63.180/hdtv/history.html - history of HDTV http://www.interfacers.com/CurrentEv...uirements.html - HDTV Advocate http://www.cbs.com/hdtv – HDTV schedule for CBS http://www.novia.net/~ereitan/index.html - history of color TV, good for perspective on introducing new TV standards in the US market http://www.bettercables.com/mvawdvd.htm - good review of aspect ratios http://216.168.63.180/hdtv/hdtvlinks.html - good collection of links, including links to stations now on the air with HDTV, good source for interview quotes from the station perspective. http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/Archives...11-002672.html – info on how to record HDTV
http://www.dtvisions.com/ - dtv consulting, hdtv production, digital media http://pub1.ezboard.com/bdigitaltelevisionhdtvforum – DTV Internet board http://www.keohi.com/keohihdtv/index.htm – HDTV tips site
http://www.antennaweb.org – OTA (off the air) antenna help http://socpsych.lacollege.edu/hdtv.html - HECHT's HDTV (HD related links) http://216.168.63.180/hdtv/prodnws2.html - production news, including the first film to be fully shot on 24fps HDTV; good material on what's being produced on HD, implication is we can't watch it if it isn't created/produced first. http://socpsych.lacollege.edu/hdtv.html – HDTV site index
http://www.hdtv.org/dtv/glossary.html - sparse glossary
http://www.hdfest.com - the world's only high-definition film festival http://www.henninger.com/library/hdtvfilm/ - good overview of resolutions & conversions; resolution charts http://www.atsc.org/ - the people who set the standard http://gehon.ir.miami.edu/com/classes/cbr535/hdtv.htm - good links; very good collection of links to pertinent HDTV documents http://www.channel4000.com/partners/tv/hometown/partners-tv-hometown-19991126-195042. html - basic FAQ from WCCO Minneapolis http://tvschedules.about.com/tvradio/tvschedules/gi/dy namic/offsite.htm?site=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.fcc.gov%2Foet%2Ffaqs%2Fdtv faqs.html - FCC FAQ page, a little technical for the layman, but pretty informative http://www.keohi.com/keohihdtv/index.htm - Keohi HDTV http://www.digitaltelevision.com - good collection of info, good archive on CODFM vs. 8VSB http://www.digitaltelevision.com/dtvbook/glossary.shtml - full glossary
http://www.highdef.org/ - HD production news and info http://www.digitalmedianet.com/HTM/R...analogMORE.htm - survey of broadcast & production facilities, shows that 30% are already all digital; good adoption rate/conversion states that he/she will need http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/Forum11/HTML/010112.html – info and opinions on DFAST issue



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Marque Dailey


[This message has been edited by marque1d (edited 05-12-2001).]


[This message has been edited by marque1d (edited 05-12-2001).]


[This message has been edited by marque1d (edited 05-12-2001).]
 

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Speedlever:


If you want HDTV, you can get almost the full complement without local broadcasters - search the forum for the Bell ExpressVu system, which will get you CBS, and I think PBS. For movies, you have the choice of DirecTV (HBO), or Dish Network (HBO & Showtime). So even if you're not in an area with HD broadcasts, you can get a significant amount of HD material anyway.


As far as the TV goes - I would suggest that the dimensions of your armoir are an inappropriate criteria for tv selection, unless the WAF (Wife Approval Factor) is a consideration. My reasoning for saying this is that in all likelyhood your armoir will cost far less than almost all of your HT equipment, and movies are tough to watch on smallish direct-view sets. Since most movies are full-frame with few closeups, you'll suffer from the "ant effect", actors are shown full-body during dialogue. Since a fair amount of our ability to interpret dialogue is dependent on facial expressions, this can be a real problem.


On this issue, I speak from first-hand experience - I went from a 32" XBR250 a couple of years ago, to a 65" 16:9, to a 82" FPTV setup. I'm not suggesting that 82" or 65" is a minimum for movies, but the 32" Sony was a real drag, especially for letterbox movies.


For the above reasons, I'd suggest you look at 4:3 tvs if your're going to get a direct-view anyway, because I'm betting that that a small television, whether it be 16:9 or 4:3 won't last long in your HT setup. If you buy a $2500 16:9 direct-view now, it might be hard to justify another 2-3k when you tire of squinting at the screen, and 4:3 HD direct-view sets can be had for $1500.


For the prices you mentioned, there are quite a few much larger RPTVs (both 4:3 and 16:9) available that will have a much higher HD resolution than any direct-view, and will give you considerably larger screen area for widescreen movies.


Good Luck!


------------------
BOYCOTT DVI/HDCP & JVC!


[This message has been edited by dkeller_NC (edited 05-12-2001).]
 

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One last point, yes, DK is right: the direct views require a closer viewing distance to enjoy the wide-screen effect. I'd plan on watching seriously from about 5-6 feet, max!

With that thought in mind, and keeping the idea that you might want an upgrade, I wouldn't rule out a 36 inch direct-view 4:3, just because they're so affordable. It would give you most of the flavor of HD without a big expense or footprint. I still think the RCA 36100 series, with all its early flaws (anyone know if the new model is more reliable) is one of the best bargains out there - great black levels, smooth color/resolution, just outstanding performance for well under 2K.

But, I've got to say, the best bargain I've run into in a long time was at Ultimate Electronics in Albuquerque last week, where they were running a special on the 46 inch 16:9 Mitsubishi HD RPTV for 1999. It had one of the best HD pictures in the room (and that's saying a lot, as there were Elite there, too) and the price can't be beat. If I lived near an Ultimate Electronics and didn't yet have HD, I'd definitely make room for this great little RPTV.

John in VA
 

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I need some help on what went wrong on my post. I have posted that same thing a number of times, and it has never jumbled all together like that. I have tried to edit my post 3 times and it still looks all cluttered up. All I want to do is separate the website from the previous description. I want it to look the same as when I posted it at the HTF http://www.hometheaterforum.com/htfo...threadid=17817


Thanks,


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Marque Dailey
 

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Buying a 4:3 direct view HDTV set is not a big advantage over a much less expensive but good quality 4:3 standard set, Unless you are planning to watch HDTV or widescreen DVDs.


I would recommend buying a DVD player first. Then, if it turns out you enjoy watching widescreen movies, but wish the picture was bigger a 16:9 direct view HDTV would be a good choice. If it turns out you enjoy widescreen movies letterboxed onto the 4:3 screen and only wish the image was sharper, then a 4:3 HDTV set could be a good choice for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
>>.marque1d<<


Holy url's, Batman! Being the research junkie that I am, I'll likely explore most of them. And by the time I'm done, HDTV prices should be *much* lower. http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/wink.gif



>>dkeller_NC<<

>>I would suggest that the dimensions of your armoir are an inappropriate criteria for tv selection, unless the WAF<<


I agree.. but the WAF looms. You are right in that the cost of that armoire is much less than the contemplated HT setup.


If I understand correctly, I can get a nice RPTV HDTV for less than the DV sets I've been considering. That might help me make a convincing argument to sell the armoire.


In which case I'll be back to the research mode for RPTVs. http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/wink.gif


>>If you buy a $2500 16:9 direct-view now, it might be hard to justify another 2-3k<<


Yes, that's true. Not to mention the fact that I have yet to see a $2500 DV HDTV anywhere (at least in the 32-34" range).



>>gnosys<<

>>I wouldn't rule out a 36 inch direct-view 4:3, just because they're so affordable.<<


Yes, I've thought of that.. except it'd need to be a 32"er to fit in that armoire. But 2 thoughts:

1)if I keep the armoire, I'm size limited.

2)what will I do with a plain vanilla 4:3 set in 5 years? (a far shorter time than we normally keep this type hardware)



>>ChadD<<

>>I would recommend buying a DVD player first<<


Unless I misunderstand what you're saying, I don't think that'll work well with our existing 19" tube. http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/wink.gif


I need to get another TV anyway.. and thought (silly me) that I might as well try to accomodate the future a bit since we don't buy HW frequently.


And then I decided it would be a good time to go ahead and do a modest HT setup as well. heheheheheh. I have found "modest" to be a relative term. http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/wink.gif


>>Unless you are planning to watch HDTV or widescreen DVDs<<


I don't know what we're planning... since we've always been 4:3.. and no DVDs to this point.


Since broadcast HDTV is quite a ways down the road for my location... and we have little use for a subscription to HBO/Showtime, our main usage of 16:9 would be in renting/buying DVD movies and concerts (again... an entirely new experience for us). So I've found it hard to project how we might actually find ourselves using this technology.


Thanks all... for your input thus far. I'm inclined to consider how I might get rid of that armoire and research RPTV. [Um, yeah. Thanks a lot. http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/wink.gif ]


BTW, our viewing/listening room is small... ~12x12x8 w/HW floors... and can be made fairly dark.




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--speedy
 

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speedlever,


Sorry that it looks all missed up and confusing. Try this link for the same info. http://www.hometheaterforum.com/htfo...threadid=17817


Also, I don't have a map in front of me but can you tell me how far you are from Raleigh, NC?
STATIONS BROADCASTING HDTV:

(CBS) - broadcasting 1080i

Most of the CBS prime-time schedule (19 I think) is broadcast in HDTV each night. Also special events, movies and sporting events are also broadcast in HDTV. Thus far this year CBS has broadcast the all AFC play-off games, Sony Open, Super Bowl, NCAA Final Four and the Masters in HDTV.

(ABC) - broadcasting 720p

ABC broadcasts several movies a month (Wonderful World of Disney and ABC’s Saturday/Sunday night Big Picture) and 'NYPD Blue' in HDTV & 5.1 DD. It is rumored that ABC will follow CBS lead and broadcast a majority of its prime-time shows in HDTV for the 2001-2002 season. They will likely bring Monday Night Football back to HDTV as well.

(PBS) - broadcasting 1080i

PBS transmits 2 - 3 new shows/documentaries a month in HDTV, plus several SDTV widescreen shows/documentaries. They also show HDTV Demonstrations regularly through out the day.

(NBC) - broadcasting 1080i

NBC carries 'The Tonight Show' in HDTV each evening. NBA all-star game as well as Dallas Mav playoff games. ER will likely be in HDTV next season since ER is presented in widescreen this season.

(Fox) - broadcasting 480p

Fox does not broadcast true HDTV (720p or 1080i), but many Fox shows are in widescreen 480p

(HBO) – broadcasting 1080i

about 80% of the movies on HBO is in HDTV. The rest are upconverted to HDTV (480i to 1080I) Most of HBO produced movies are shown in HDTV. The Soprano’s is broadcast in HDTV. The Bruce Springsting Concert this Saturday (4-7-01) will also be televised in HDTV and 5.1 DD.

(ShowTime) – broadcasting 1080i

ShowTime is currently only available on C-Band (I think), Dish Network and some Cable systems. I would say that about 65 to 70%of the movies on ShowTime are broadcast in HDTV. The rest are upconverted to HDTV.

(MSG-HD) – broadcasting 1080i

Madison Square Garden’s sports station shows the Knick, Rangers and Yankees home games in HDTV. But it is currently an exclusive to Cablevision in NY. It will be available for other cable and satellite companies in 2002.

(Fox Sports – HD) – broadcasting 1080i

Fox sports broadcast New York Islanders, New Jersey Devils, New Jersey Nets, and New York Mets home games in HDTV. But it is currently an exclusive to Cablevision in NY.

(Discovery) - broadcasting 1080i

The Discovery channel should have its HDTV channel up and running by the end of the year.

(Portland Trail Blazers) - broadcasting format is unknown at this time 720p or 1080i

Paul Allen and the Portland Trail Blazers have confirmed an HDTV Sports Channel which may be on the air as soon end of the summer. http://www1.nba.com/blazers/news/hdt...av=ArticleList

(Mark Cuban’s HDTV Sport Channel) - broadcasting format unknown 720p or 1080i

Mark Cuban founder of http://www.broadcast.com and owner of the Dallas Mavericks is also planing an HDTV Sports Network.



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Marque Dailey
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
>>marque1d<<

>>Try this link for the same info.<<


I did.. from your 2nd post earlier. IAC, all the links look like they're there in your first post. http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/wink.gif


>>can you tell me how far you are from Raleigh, NC<<


~75 miles west of Raleigh... and ~75 miles NE of Charlotte.




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--speedy
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
dkeller_NC


>>You would, of course, need an outdoor antenna on a mast, and probably a pre-amp, but 75 miles is not out of the question.<<


The requirement for the antenna is a big negative for me. Not even sure it'd be allowed in my residential area.


>the 46" 16:9 Mitsu apparently has dropped in price to $2000 across the board, since NowAudio/Video in Raleigh<<


Very interesting! Especially since the DV models I was considering were ~$1700 (4:3) and ~$3500 (16:9). Is this Mits the WT-46807 model? Any idea what the 55" models are running?


I have NOW locally in Greesnboro and Winston-Salem.


Any negatives about that 46" Mits I should know about? (I haven't even begun to research RPTVs yet). Are there consumables (bulbs) that are a cost factor?


>.the Mitsubishi is a real bargain - and much higher resolution than any direct-view, to boot<<


From what little I've seen of RPTVs, that surprises me. Most have been dark and grainy (in stores like BestBuy/CircuitCity, etc). So that is good to know.


A quick ? (is there such a thing?) I understand DV sets in HDTV are up to 1920x1080i... or 720p. And that my computer monitor is 800x600p... 1024x768p (what I use) or up to 1920x1440p.


Do RPTVs have similar resolution numbers? Or is their resolution defined entirely differently?


Thanks.



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--speedy


[This message has been edited by speedlever (edited 05-13-2001).]
 

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Speedlever:


My situation last October was similar to yours. Our main TV died and a replacement needed to fit in a 35 inch wide space in our home entertainment cabinet. (Notice I did NOT say home theater.)


Even after looking at many 16x9 sets (properly adjusted with HDTV programs), my wife still insisted on a 4x3 solution. I came very close to buying the RCA 36 inch DV set. Fortunately, I pondered long enough to stumble onto a Hitachi 36 inch DV set that is a near twin to the RCA, but with more features at less cost.


My Hitachi 36SDX01SR HD-ready TV/Monitor includes the following features that helped me decide to buy it:


- Hi-res (0.77) ultrablack invar mask picture tube

- 2 VGA/SVGA D-Sub Mini 15-pin connectors (for computers and

RCA DTC-100 HD/OTA STB direct input connections)

- 480p progressive scan Component Video input (DVD)

- Remote-switchable Anamorphic Squeeze on Component input

- Internal Line Doubler (for "filling in" interlaced sources)

- Separate video settings for Component vs. SVGA inputs


The comparable RCA set lacked the last four items listed above. The Hitachi was available for $300 less than the RCA.


So, if you do end up choosing to go the 4x3 direct view route, take a look at the Hitachi.
http://www.hitachi.com/products/cons...sdx/index.html


I am not trying to convince you to go 4x3 over 16x9, I am just offering another 4x3 option that meets your 35 inch width requirement and offers more flexibility than any other HD-ready 36 inch set that I have seen.


BTW, the advice given earlier about expecting your viewing habits and choices to change is important.


We started with just buying a replacement TV that could accept HD and DVD later. It wasn't long before we bought a progressive scan DVD player. The "enahnced for widescreen" DVD movies are incredible that way.


Soon we dropped our cable in exchange for DirecTV satellite and an RCA DTC-100 DirecTV and off-the-air (OTA) set top box. It turns out we have 5 local channels broadcasting SDTV or HDTV OTA. Again, we saw incredible picture detail and especially incredible color, both on HDTV and SDTV. Even their upconverted NTSC digital transmissions are ghost free and as clean as can be (zero noise or snow) with improved color. I use a $20 UHF-only Radio Shack antenna on my roof.


Later we added a DirecTiVo personal video recorder (PVR) to time shift programs--picture quality not near as good as HDTV or SDTV, but not bad using S-video inputs. The DirecTiVo unit also receives and records Dolby Digital 5.1 sound from DirecTV satellite programs. Recorded PPV movies with DD 5.1 sound are almost as good as a DVD and far more convenient.


IMHO, a good 5.1 sound system adds even more than picture quality does to the viewing experience and enjoyment. DD 5.1 sound is available from the RCA DTC-100 and the DVD player also.


If I had the space and WAF, I would have gone with a 16x9, 40 to 55 inch RPTV (for our small room), although many I looked at seemed to have major convergence problems (usually a dealer set-up problem rather than a set design problem).


Good luck on your research and decision.


Dave
 

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These are the prices from http://www.crazyeddie.com


Mitsubishi WS-55807 is $2579.95

Mitsubushi WT-46807 is $1889.95

Toshiba 40H80 is $1699.95

RCA F36310 is $2297.95

Panasonic PT-56WXF95 is $2749.95

Panasonic CT-34WX50 is $2939.95

Samsung PCJ534RF is $1799.95
http://www.electroline4u.com/ may have cheaper prices.


The Dish 6000 starts at 298.95 at http://www.allsat.com





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Marque Dailey
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
>>Budget_HT<<

>>My Hitachi 36SDX01SR HD-ready TV/Monitor<<


I took a look at that set... it will also fit the opening, as you suggested. I bookmarked that one for consideration... once I figger out what I'm gonna do.


Thanks for the suggestion.. and the diffs w/r/t the RCA tv.



>>marque1d<<

>>Mitsubishi WS-55807 is $2579.95

Mitsubushi WT-46807 is $1889.95<<


Jeez. All these are under the local pricing on the 34wx50 that I've found. Then again, it's crazy eddie's site!


I'd guess that considering sales taxes vs shipping, there wouldn't be *that* much diff buying the 46" set locally, if I can get if for $2k or less.


>>The Dish 6000 starts at 298.95 at http://www.allsat.com<<


Is that for new subscribers only? I probably oughta replace my 4000 receiver anyway... since lightning took out the modem section some time back. (Now protected by a quality surge protector!)




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--speedy
 

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Speedlever:


It's a long shot, but you may be able to pick up WRAL-DT from Raleigh. You would, of course, need an outdoor antenna on a mast, and probably a pre-amp, but 75 miles is not out of the question.


By the way - the 46" 16:9 Mitsu apparently has dropped in price to $2000 across the board, since NowAudio/Video in Raleigh is also selling them for this price. Considering that a Sony 4:3 32" XBR400 is selling for about $1800 from the local CircuitCity (you can find them cheaper on the web), the Mitsubishi is a real bargain - and much higher resolution than any direct-view, to boot. Sounds like you have some real convincing to do on the wife. http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/smile.gif


You might start by going to Raleigh to a Now! store and ask them to hook up a DVD player to both the Mitsu and the Sony 32 & 36" XBR400s. When your wife sees the difference in size between these sets for about the same money, she might decide the armoir would make a good bedroom closet. http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/wink.gif


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BOYCOTT DVI/HDCP & JVC!
 
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