AVS Forum banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,373 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So I decided to make myself some DIY masking and I could not be happier. Here is my story.







First I cannibalized the box my screen came in. I was able to get 6 panels all the perfect length and Height. As shown in the image I used double sided carpet tape to laminate 3 pieces per panel. The panels were still kind of flimsy and the edge was not perfect.






I decided to use drywall outside corners to get a perfect edge and make the panels very rigid but still light. I used tuct tape to secure the corners, the advatge for me using these type of corners is the flexibilty of the paper with the edge and strength of the narrow steel. Now the panels are rigid and light. I also attached some of the 90 degree corners that were used to support the screen box, but this was way overkill.











I then attached triple black velvet to my panels. I used tacks to tighten and work the material taut, followed by generous amount of tuct tape to secure the tacks and material. The result is a wrinkle free perfect panel. Very light and rigid. I use hand clamps to secure the panels, takes maybe 1 min.








Total cost about 60 dollars. Effect priceless.



Strange how small my screen looks in the picture. My screen actually takes up the entire wall.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,493 Posts
I just got new projector (Sony HW30ES) and the black bars appear .... black.


So I was watching a movie and realized it was scope ratio and I should pause and put up my DIY masks.


Then, I thought,.. Well ... The bars look black so what's the point?


Well,... they still made a huge difference. Maybe more of a difference than on my last Pj. I will certainly use them every time I watch a scope movie.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,324 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Hampton  /t/1526008/diy-masking#post_24572800


I just got new projector (Sony HW30ES) and the black bars appear .... black.


So I was watching a movie and realized it was scope ratio and I should pause and put up my DIY masks.


Then, I thought,.. Well ... The bars look black so what's the point?


Well,... they still made a huge difference. Maybe more of a difference than on my last Pj. I will certainly use them every time I watch a scope movie.

Yeah, the new JVC's have the best contrast/black levels of any consumer projector and the difference between the "black projected" bars for 2:35:1 movies and my black masking is very obvious.


I've long given up any credence to claims "the black bars on my screen are totally black and don't need any masking." That's only if you don't have masking to compare it with.

cardoski,


Well done. Ingenious use of the screen box.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Brian Hampton

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,553 Posts
This may be of interest to some:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,494 Posts
I've got a scope screen and so far watching ~1:85:1 AR movies without masking hasn't bothered me at all, but I still might try making some DIY masks and see how it looks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,324 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidHir  /t/1526008/diy-masking#post_24576944


I've got a scope screen and so far watching ~1:85:1 AR movies without masking hasn't bothered me at all, but I still might try making some DIY masks and see how it looks.

Warning: If you get around to trying masking I think you'll find it hard to go back.


Although masking makes a bit more difference when you are covering up "projected black bars" for scope in a 16:9 screen, it can still make a difference when covering the un-projected area on a 2:35:1 screen for 16:9 content. I used both top and bottom masking in my set up and find both essential. Though, as I see from your posts you've just got your first projection set up recently. Masking tends to be a down-the-road kinda thing once you've gotten used to the thrill of projection and start more tweaking.


(Although I'm 4 years into my projection set up and haven't come close to getting over the thrill. I'm still rifling through every movie I ever loved, re-experiencing them in cinema form instead of "on TV." In a way it's more magical for me to see old movies on Blu-Ray that I've always loved, since I'd only ever seen them on TV and now I can experience them much as I would have when projected in the theaters. A bit of time travel).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
438 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by R Harkness  /t/1526008/diy-masking#post_24572931


Yeah, the new JVC's have the best contrast/black levels of any consumer projector and the difference between the "black projected" bars for 2:35:1 movies and my black masking is very obvious.


I've long given up any credence to claims "the black bars on my screen are totally black and don't need any masking." That's only if you don't have masking to compare it with.

Even if you had a projector that put out TRUE black (ie, absolutely NO light in the black bars), the bars would still appear washed out compared to the black velvet frame. Or if you masked the top and bottom of the projector lens so that no light was projected into the black bars, they would still be washed out. That is because practically any room has some light bouncing around and reflecting back onto the screen when the projector is on.

The black bars can be no blacker than the given ambient light level in the room. So unless every single thing in your room is covered in black velvet, you will probably benefit from masking. I suppose if you throw a gray screen into the mix, that may change the argument a bit, but the gray screen comes with other trade-offs.


But in summary, I think it is safe to say that most of the recent, high-contrast projectors are capable of better black levels than most of the home theaters rooms they find themselves installed in.




On a related note, if you have the best JVC projector out there, but your room is not treated properly, then the terrific black levels are wasted, and you could have saved your money by going with a nice Epson or Panasonic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,324 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Edgar_in_Indy  /t/1526008/diy-masking#post_24621714


Even if you had a projector that put out TRUE black (ie, absolutely NO light in the black bars), the bars would still appear washed out compared to the black velvet frame. Or if you masked the top and bottom of the projector lens so that no light was projected into the black bars, they would still be washed out. That is because practically any room has some light bouncing around and reflecting back onto the screen when the projector is on.

The black bars can be no blacker than the given ambient light level in the room. So unless every single thing in your room is covered in black velvet, you will probably benefit from masking.

I do indeed watch movies in a "black velvet box" and still benefit from masking because the black levels of the JVC are not truly black, and this can even be exacerbated in a "bat cave" situation where the projected black bars

(and other projected black areas) of the image are contrasted against the pitch dark surroundings. So even in low APL images (little to no light reflection wash out) the difference between pitch black masking and the projected black bars.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
438 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by R Harkness  /t/1526008/diy-masking#post_24621754


I do indeed watch movies in a "black velvet box" and still benefit from masking because the black levels of the JVC are not truly black, and this can even be exacerbated in a "bat cave" situation where the projected black bars

(and other projected black areas) of the image are contrasted against the pitch dark surroundings. So even in low APL images (little to no light reflection wash out) the difference between pitch black masking and the projected black bars.

Good points. The situation I was describing was mostly hypothetical since pretty much every home theater projector is still limited when it comes to true black, but it's good to hear your real world experience with a top-notch projector in an ideal room.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,373 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
It seems to me that my completely black room actually makes the black bars stand out a bit more. Because the room disappears into a void the black bars really contrast. Either way masking is night and day and really gives you that in the movies feel. I imagine it would be nice to have a massive CIH screen, I appreciate width over height while watching a movie.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,553 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Elix  /t/1526008/diy-masking#post_24577310


I wonder if that would work with a pull-down screen.

This would....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
325 Posts
I use hand clamps to secure the panels, takes maybe 1 min.



Are you using a pull down screen? If nor, and maybe I am having a brain freeze, but how do you clamp the over the screen frame and if you do isn't there a gap between the masking and the frame that you would see for the top mask?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,373 Posts
Discussion Starter #18

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay7  /t/1526008/diy-masking#post_24623776


I use hand clamps to secure the panels, takes maybe 1 min.



Are you using a pull down screen? If nor, and maybe I am having a brain freeze, but how do you clamp the over the screen frame and if you do isn't there a gap between the masking and the frame that you would see for the top mask?


I have a fixed frame and there is space between the masking and screen but it can not be noticed while watching . The masking disappears just like the screen frame, still super happy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
325 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by cardoski  /t/1526008/diy-masking#post_24623917


I have a fixed frame and there is space between the masking and screen but it can not be noticed while watching . The masking disappears just like the screen frame, still super happy.

How do you clamp it around a fixed frame? Maybe your frame sits off the wall enough to get a clamp behind it.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top