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I like it, didn’t notice the cables until you mentioned them. It’s begging for a projector and a screen that fills that wall. Consider a used jvc dila projector to throw a bigger picture, they’re pretty reasonable if you do some homework, and accept 1080 or faux-k. Look up minimalist screen wall. Paint the room black or grey walls and black ceiling and screen wall. Or just grey.
 

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Really depends on goals and end use.

Subs are fairly easy. I would not say the same for full range speakers. There are mostly anecdotal reviews of the DIY full range kits, I may be mistaken but I haven't seen full spinorama data on anything like a 1099. It would be enlightening, I'm sure. That said, making a proper full range speaker -that actually performs with high fidelity- is not a walk in the park. I would tend to err towards something from a designer like Dennis Murphy, or has spin data that you can interpret and know the value of, best if in concert with having heard a local pair (may be a tall order). This is no slight on the 1099's, I just have not heard them in person or seen (in depth) measurements.


Chris
 

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Do you have any suggestions as to where to put the Devastators? I could do nearfield or against the side walls behind the couch, or I could take away the tv stand and place them on their sides.
you might want to see if this adds to placement optimization

also, bring up a room mode calculator, find out what the room "likes" - or not
 

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just a quick tip.. if you really are measuring that close to your seat, you are too close... you really need the mic at least 12 inches from any surface... even if it is "exactly" where your ears are...

that includes when you calibrate any room correction (YPAO/Audessey/Dirac). You'll chase things you probably shouldn't, and even worse, fix things you shouldn't if you measure too close to the seat back...
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
that includes when you calibrate any room correction (YPAO/Audessey/Dirac). You'll chase things you probably shouldn't, and even worse, fix things you shouldn't if you measure too close to the seat back...
Well, this is a big deal. Even with my crappy AVR-S570BT's "room correction" I've been the little mic on my chair.

I'd love to do some room correction with REW but but I actually haven't been able to run it yet. I have a nice PC but it's upstairs in my office and I don't have a laptop to run it on.

also, bring up a room mode calculator, find out what the room "likes" - or not
I used this AMROC room mode calculator and I guess I didn't know what I expected. I assumed I'd be able to get actionable intelligence from this but I guess I just don't know how to decipher it. Could someone simplify this or show me how to use it?
3118333
 

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Well, this is a big deal. Even with my crappy AVR-S570BT's "room correction" I've been the little mic on my chair.

I'd love to do some room correction with REW but but I actually haven't been able to run it yet. I have a nice PC but it's upstairs in my office and I don't have a laptop to run it on.



I used this AMROC room mode calculator and I guess I didn't know what I expected. I assumed I'd be able to get actionable intelligence from this but I guess I just don't know how to decipher it. Could someone simplify this or show me how to use it?
View attachment 3118333

yeah, i can tell ya from personal experience, I did the same with my first run of room correction... i set the mic on the top of the back cushion, and the results were... bad... i actually turned off the room correction and couldn't understand why people used it for a year or more, then read that you dont really want to put the mic where your head, or seat is... you want it usually about 18" from any surfaces, in the middle of the stereo imaging spot between your L/R. Basically where the ideal seat would be, even if there isn't a seat there... this lets the software properly measure the room interactions of the speakers and not try to overcorrect...

anyway, good luck!
 

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putting a speaker ina drywa;ll bay is merely taking advantage of the extra 3 1/2" of depth, and going IB for that driver, as has been done with V10's.
no laptop . . tricky
on your PC get REW . one feature there is you can plot your room and place the subs around the room - may help.
wrt subs NF, near the seating, how far back is the seating from the front wall /screen?
 

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A great HOW-TO video in four parts. Walks through, from using a MiniDSP 2x4HD or not, using REW RTA function for subwoofer placement, integration of sub to main, best crossovers for your speakers. Best tutorial terse succinct. Not hour-long discussions.

BTW, I set my room up as recommended by Anthony Grimani, asymmetrical, I could not be happier.
Home Theater Gamer
 

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with the idea that the whole room layout should rotate 180 degrees,
just how important is that egress window to be not blocked off?
that allows building a false wall . . . say 36" deep
would that allow for going to a PJ and 100" +DIY screen?
a bigger screen means more viewing range and more speaker layout possibilities
could the Devs and LCR be hidden back there? maybe a MBM like under the CC, just for TR kicks?
would "shortening" the room make for a better planned ATMOS layout?
do you have enough power wired into the room?
would Ancient Alien Theorists agree?
this might provide remote sub amp power switching, from amazon
Iot Relay - Enclosed High-power Power Relay for Arduino, Raspberry Pi, PIC or Wifi, Relay Shield
but there's a better one with higher power rating , name escapes me at the moment goes for about $150, I should get one myself
just some other food for thought


 

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I have no direct experience with either, but they look like the 1099 and the emotiva speakers are addressing completely different applications.

As far as DIY versus made for you, so long as you're not paid a living wage for your own time (this is a hobby), in terms of what you get for the money, on a functional end product, DIY is always better.

But as Chris pointed out, once you get into a range above the subwoofer, getting all those components to integrate well isn't a plug and play prospect, and arguably the largest variable that affects your end performance is how well the device was designed for a specific application. If you want to make an intelligent selection, first you need to decide the requirements for your application, then you need to find a design that addresses that.

Based purely on the emotiva website information, I can't say anything useful about the merits of what they're doing. I can say generally that some AMT folded ribbon tweeters (or whatever you want to call them) are very good when well-implemented and matched to purpose, but particularly in the 'high-end' (kind of) oriented market, semi-specialist brands, if you really want an accurate speaker, and I think it would be a mistake to assume that you necessarily do, it would be good to be aware that many speakers are 'voiced', or even select drivers with intentional colorations to make the sound more superficially impressive, interesting, detailed, whatever, to listeners who largely, perhaps more than 99% of the time, without a bunch of time with a whole range of experiences and objective data to correlate, wouldn't know an accurate speaker from one that was wildly objectively flawed. It is my personal experience and preference to go for speakers that are objectively accurate in the most commonly accepted measurements (and priorities are debatable) and then tailor and adjust the playback EQ over the entire system for my own subjective satisfaction, and that varies depending on what I'm listening to, both in terms of content and playback level, but most people either cannot or won't do that, for a variety of reasons, but in my experience, it's easier to add colorations to taste to compliment specific listening material, and much more difficult (or impossible) to remove what is inherent in the playback system. Then again, if you like the colorations of a sonic character all of the time, you don't need to remove it.

I would only add, that if you do actually take the time and effort to listen to find a speaker you like, be aware that while all speakers will sound a little different simply because of performance variances inherent to devices that are categorically imperfect, how the room interacts with the combination, etc., a relatively accurate driver operating within a good design is not going to sound dramatically different than another in a similar context, at least in itself.

You can come up with all sorts of examples that seem to refute this, but all of those examples I can imagine aren't what I'm talking about, which is more specifically oriented about the story that often goes into selling loudspeakers to mostly uneducated consumers, that focuses on exotic materials or seemingly 'high-tech' technology. In other words, a relatively transparent ribbon tweeter, given the same frequency response, distortion levels and characteristics, and dispersion characteristics, will sound more alike than different to a metal dome or soft dome tweeter if all else is indeed equal, which in practice, they almost never are. But more to the point, the differences are as or more related to how that visible technology (the materials of the diaphragm for example) were implemented to compliment, or not, the more mundane tech that is often invisible, and rarely makes for good marketing copy.

All of that being said, you are the final judge when it comes to deciding your satisfaction level, and while it is definitely good to collect as much information as possible, including opinions and anecdotal information, flushing out what you actually want, and if possible, actually listening to things, once you get something that makes you happy, my best suggestion is to enjoy the heck out of it, and understand that you are entitled to, and you don't need the approval of anybody else to justify that.

Good luck, and enjoy your ride, and while you're doing that, it wouldn't hurt, for the sake of getting the most useful feedback, that you risk waxing poetic about what kind of experience you're trying to have, and referencing any experiences you've had (including equipment) that touch on that, or failed to do so.
 

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this one
Niles AC3 FG00242 Voltage Triggered AC Power Strip (Black)
 

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Niles AC3 work well.

If you want to put something in a box, or or don't mind building a box to put a bunch in and wire up independent control, these seems to work well too...

Schneider Electric 92S11d22d-12D Enclosed Power Relay,8 Pin,12Vdc,Dpdt, on ebay for under $20, less than $25 each after shipping...
3118834


I used them inside of my ICEPower amplifier boxes, and they seemed to work just fine, rated to 20 amps. You could stuff a bunch of these inside a little project box and have a whole slew of individually voltage-trigger controlled outlets.

3118836
 

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@(The Other) Colin Miller )
^ I WANT and can do.
tentative schematic, SIR, if you can . . .
pm would be just fine
Please
for my 2 Berry 6K's
each currently (pun intended) on their own 20 A circuits
that'd be 2 separate 120 v inputs, one for each asmp
and only 1 trigger circuit for the whole box.
TYIA
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Niles AC3 work well.

If you want to put something in a box, or or don't mind building a box to put a bunch in and wire up independent control, these seems to work well too...

Schneider Electric 92S11d22d-12D Enclosed Power Relay,8 Pin,12Vdc,Dpdt, on ebay for under $20, less than $25 each after shipping...
3118834


I used them inside of my ICEPower amplifier boxes, and they seemed to work just fine, rated to 20 amps. You could stuff a bunch of these inside a little project box and have a whole slew of individually voltage-trigger controlled outlets.
This seems awesome, and I would love doing something like this, but it looks/seems super intimidating from someone whose electrical knowledge ends at hanging ceiling fans, fixing power cords, and basic soldering. Is there a walkthough for someone who is less savvy with this kind of stuff?
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
with the idea that the whole room layout should rotate 180 degrees,
just how important is that egress window to be not blocked off?
that allows building a false wall . . . say 36" deep
would that allow for going to a PJ and 100" +DIY screen?
a bigger screen means more viewing range and more speaker layout possibilities
could the Devs and LCR be hidden back there? maybe a MBM like under the CC, just for TR kicks?
would "shortening" the room make for a better planned ATMOS layout?
I love this idea, but to be honest, this sounds end-game to me and I'm definitely not up for a false wall at the moment. This project has enough mission creep enough as it is!

Consider me strange, but I like the idea of upgrading one(ish) part of the home theater at a time (or so) to lengthen that new toy feel. I'm sure you guys know what I mean.
 

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@(The Other) Colin Miller )
^ I WANT and can do.
tentative schematic, SIR, if you can . . .
pm would be just fine
Please
for my 2 Berry 6K's
each currently (pun intended) on their own 20 A circuits
that'd be 2 separate 120 v inputs, one for each asmp
and only 1 trigger circuit for the whole box.
TYIA
OKAY!

I will see if I an get a good picture and bust out my MS Paint skill.
 

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Better yet, I found my scribble notes on graph paper when I drew it out for myself to make sure I didn't screw something up. It probably looks worse than it really is. But this is as it was implemented to control dual amplifier modules, with the 12 volt trigger input routed through a front panel switch. It was wired so that if you held the 12 volt trigger input high, you could switch the amplifier on and off with the front panel switch. Or if you want to switch power with the 12 volt trigger, leave the front panel button pushed 'on'. the front panel switch follows the status of the power control relay and amplifier power...

3118894


The top diagram shows the actual power routing. The neutral and ground cables all go straight back to the IEC power connector. Only the hot 'Line' cable goes through the relay.

The bottom diagram shows the wiring of the low voltage control side, through the switch. If you don't need to use a front panel button, just wire the 12 volt trigger straight to the 12 volt relay control inputs.

The 'switch' diagram on the left shows the wire connections on the front panel switch, if you care.

I got mine in blue...

3118898


$8 on Ebay, free shipping, no complaints...


This diagram shows how the relay works, and is all you need if you just want to control power through a 12 volt input.

3118905


You can see how the 12 VDC relay input voltage input swings the relay contacts from N.C. (Normal Closed) and COM connected, to N.O. (Normal Open) Connected to COM. Note, that both sides of the relay are independent, as this is a 'dual pole' relay switch. The 'Dual Throw' is the part we're not using (Or I didn't use), which is when the 12 VDC relay input goes away, it reconnects COM to N.C.

They switch together via the same 12 VDC input, but in terms of a circuit, they are separate. How you want to use that is entirely up to you. I just put one amplifier on each side, but they could have been on a single port. I also could have been really fancy and put two power connectors, so that each amplifier could have been on a separate dedicated line, with entirely independent power circuits, but using the same relay, saving big bucks sharing a relay, but making it more 'dual mono'. :p

You only switch the 'hot', and the neutral and ground connectors all go 'home' to your AC input connector, and you probably want to ground the chassis as well, if it isn't already.
 

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I have found from personal experience that building your own speakers yields far better sound quality then you can puchase dollar for dollar. If you have to tools, time, and skill set, i say DIY.
 
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