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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am thinking about putting up a ~100" screen in anticipation of buying a projector. I have looked into DIY for a fixed screen and I am confident I could build something with good results. I am not sure what exact method I would use but it seems that I would generally be looking at around $200-250 or so when all is said and done. I have also priced fixed frame and electric screens and have seen prices starting at around $350 in both categories. Now, $100-200 additional isn't anything to balk at, but my time is limited and valuable and getting a ready to go product is appealing. On the other hand, I do like the satisfaction of ending up with a superior product by doing it myself compared to what the same amount of money would purchase.


So, I am wondering how the quality of the lower cost screens (Elite, Accuscreen or the lower cost Drapers) compare to a DIY (using Wilsonart Designer White laminate, for example). What price range do I have to be willing to go up to to get a comparable screen to a DIY job? Like I said, cost is a factor and I don't want to spend more than ~$400 on a screen, but if I can get equivalent or better results for that price or less I would probably just buy one. Also, if I went with a electric screen I would be able to move it about 24" farther forward (~12' from seating location) and possibly be able to go slightly larger. (Of course there are only a few electric choices in that price range)


Thanks,


Matt
 

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DIY Granddad (w/help)
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Matt,


DIY can offer you extremely great value/performance. However much more info is needed other than your willingness to spend to achieve the best possible surface. One thing for certain, DIY has several offering that will come in under $200.00 for Screens up to 130" diagonal; ...and they all will be superior to any Mfg product if done correctly.
  • Projector of choice?
  • Throw distance?
  • Room lighting type, location, and presence during viewing?
  • Room colors. (Wall & Ceiling)

Tell us....:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by MississippiMan /forum/post/19544169


Matt,


DIY can offer you extremely great value/performance. However much more info is needed other than your willingness to spend to achieve the best possible surface. One thing for certain, DIY has several offering that will come in under $200.00 for Screens up to 130" diagonal; ...and they all will be superior to any Mfg product if done correctly.
  • Projector of choice?
  • Throw distance?
  • Room lighting type, location, and presence during viewing?
  • Room colors. (Wall & Ceiling)

Tell us....:

Thanks for the reply (on this post and my other post). I kind of jumped the gun and went ahead and ordered the 8020 framework. Just got too excited I guess and the total cost is only going to be ~$200 or so. I will say up front that I realize this room isn't ideal for a projector but it is the best I can do. I really want the large screen experience of a projector so I will do what I have to do to make it work. Anyway, top answer your questions:


I am leaning towards the Epson 8350 or the Panny 4000. Ideally I want the the center of the projector at about 13'2" from the screen, so the throw distance will probably be somewhere around 12'6". I am flexible if need be on placement though and I did the comps on several projectors and I should be able to get whatever I end up with to work fine at that throw distance and screen size.


All of the room lighting is on controlled dimmers and there is a chance some of the lights towards the back of the room could be on during casual use. For serious viewing though, all lights will be off. The room has a 12' wide sliding glass door and four moderately large windows. However, we are going to install some serious curtains that should block out any daylight.


Room color is a darkish green with white ceilings. There is a tray ceiling that surrounds the room and it is quite deep where the screen will be so I will likely have to paint the tray part of the ceiling the same green as the room. Also, I have plans (although I don't know when they will come to fruition) to put in a wood paneled system over the rest of the ceiling.


Hopefully that helps, though it is a little after the fact. While I did order the 8020 framework, I still need to make a final decision on screen material. I am leaning towards Wilsonart but still open to suggestions. The only catch is that the 8020 frame that I got is the twin tab and my plan is to mount the screen onto a sheet of plywood and "capture" it in the tabs.


Thanks,


Matt
 

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DIY Granddad (w/help)
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Hi again!


OK...unless your needful of the Panny's Lens memory, the Epson is almost assuredly the better all-around deal.


The rest of your project seems purposefully directed and right on track. The paint should be Flat, certainly at least on the Soffit overhanging the Screen area.


I think your headed in a very "right" direction. Any further questions or advice you need, post 1st...do afterward.


Good Luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the replies and help MM. Do you (or anyone else) know if there is any reason that I should not use the Wilsonart vertical laminate? My plans to use the 8020 twin tab product call for a very tight clearance and it would be very close with the thicker laminate, whereas the vertical laminate would give me just a bit of a margin. Either way, the laminate will be applied to a 1/4" sheet of plywood so once it is mounted durability shouldn't be an issue. I just want to make sure the vertical laminate would be the visual equivalent of the thicker product.


Thanks,


Matt
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by snmhanson /forum/post/19548388


Thanks for the replies and help MM. Do you (or anyone else) know if there is any reason that I should not use the Wilsonart vertical laminate? My plans to use the 8020 twin tab product call for a very tight clearance and it would be very close with the thicker laminate, whereas the vertical laminate would give me just a bit of a margin. Either way, the laminate will be applied to a 1/4" sheet of plywood so once it is mounted durability shouldn't be an issue. I just want to make sure the vertical laminate would be the visual equivalent of the thicker product.


Thanks,


Matt

They should be the same


No reason other than doing the same inspection of the surface upon receipt.

Since your "laminating" it onto another solid substrate, your cool, but I'd sure consider something other than 1/4" Plywood. Maybe 1/4" Foam Board like Sintra....something that will never warp or buckle. It's not a great idea to count on your Framing to do every bit of supporting as far as keeping the entire surface flat and even.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by MississippiMan /forum/post/19549947


They should be the same


No reason other than doing the same inspection of the surface upon receipt.

Since your "laminating" it onto another solid substrate, your cool, but I'd sure consider something other than 1/4" Plywood. Maybe 1/4" Foam Board like Sintra....something that will never warp or buckle. It's not a great idea to count on your Framing to do every bit of supporting as far as keeping the entire surface flat and even.

What about MDF? Foam would probably work for me as well, but I don't know if I have a good local source, whereas MDF is easy to find. MDF would be a bit heavy but that's ok. Also, I plan on (somehow) attaching my frame to the wall in multiple spots around the perimeter rather than hanging it, so I don't think I'll have to worry too much about warping - unless the middle of the board wants to flex.


Matt
 

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DIY Granddad (w/help)
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The only issue with Mdf is that some types of thin adhesives do not stick well, tending to be absorbed rather than bond the two surfaces with a sticky film that dries. Many use Contact cement, but only after sealing the MDF first.


Re-positional cements are probably the best.
 
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