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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Copy/paste from my website. If the format doesn't transfer well, again, go to my website:


DIYSG 1099 Speaker Review
  • Monday, Jun 7, 2021
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Foreword / YouTube Video Review
The review on this website is a brief overview and summary of the objective performance of this speaker. It is not intended to be a deep dive. Moreso, this is information for those who prefer “just the facts” and prefer to have the data without the filler.

<<video review coming soon>>

For a primer on what the data means, please watch my series of videos where I provide in-depth discussion and examples of how to read the graphics presented hereon.


Information and Photos
The DIY Sound Group 1099 is a DIY design from Ryan Bouma which is available in kit form from DIYSG. Here are some notes from the product page:
The Elusive 1099 has gained a cult following since it hit the DIY scene many years ago. ‘1099’ refers to the 10” woofers and the high sensitivity of 99db (2.83V/1m). Keeping parts in stock for this speaker was difficult, which is how it received the ‘Elusive’ name. And custom 10” black coned woofers for this speaker had to be manufactured by Eminence and the Celestion midranges are special ordered from the UK. Most people wanted the front baffles without roundovers, so I’m no longer getting them made with roundovers and they all have square edges.
These speakers were loaned to me by their owner, who built them from the kit.

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CTA-2034 (SPINORAMA) and Accompanying Data
All data collected using Klippel’s Near-Field Scanner. The Near-Field-Scanner 3D (NFS) offers a fully automated acoustic measurement of direct sound radiated from the source under test. The radiated sound is determined in any desired distance and angle in the 3D space outside the scanning surface. Directivity, sound power, SPL response and many more key figures are obtained for any kind of loudspeaker and audio system in near field applications (e.g. studio monitors, mobile devices) as well as far field applications (e.g. professional audio systems). Utilizing a minimum of measurement points, a comprehensive data set is generated containing the loudspeaker’s high resolution, free field sound radiation in the near and far field. For a detailed explanation of how the NFS works and the science behind it, please watch the below discussion with designer Christian Bellmann:

The reference point for these measurements is just below the tweeter axis (approximately 15mm).

Measurements are provided in a format in accordance with the Standard Method of Measurement for In-Home Loudspeakers (ANSI/CTA-2034-A R-2020). For more information, please see this link.

CTA-2034 / SPINORAMA:
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Early Reflections Breakout:
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Estimated In-Room Response:
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Horizontal Frequency Response (0° to ±90°):
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Vertical Frequency Response (0° to ±40°):
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Horizontal Contour Plot (not normalized):
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Horizontal Contour Plot (normalized):
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Vertical Contour Plot (not normalized):
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Vertical Contour Plot (normalized):
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Additional Measurements

Impedance Magnitude and Phase + Equivalent Peak Dissipation Resistance (EPDR)


For those who do not know what EPDR is (ahem, me until 2020), Keith Howard came up with this metric which he defined in a 2007 article for Stereophile as:
… simply the resistive load that would give rise to the same peak device dissipation as the speaker itself.
A note from Dr. Jack Oclee-Brown of Kef (who supplied the formula for calculating EPDR):
Just a note of caution that the EPDR derivation is based on a class-B output stage so it’s valid for typical class-AB amps but certainly not for class-A and probably has only marginal relevance for class-D amps (would love to hear from a class-D expert on this topic).
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I was curious what would happen if you increased the voltage to 2.83vRMS so I measured the impedance at this voltage level and plotted the EPDR for it and 0.10vRMS below. The two are identical and therefore you see only what appears to be one set of data in the graph below.

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On-Axis Response Linearity
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“Globe” Plots
These plots are generated from exporting the Klippel data to text files. I then process that data with my own MATLAB script to provide what you see. These are not part of any software packages and are unique to my tests.

Horizontal Polar (Globe) Plot:
This represents the sound field at 2 meters - above 200Hz - per the legend in the upper left.
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Vertical Polar (Globe) Plot:
This represents the sound field at 2 meters - above 200Hz - per the legend in the upper left.
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Harmonic Distortion
Harmonic Distortion at 86dB @ 1m:
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Harmonic Distortion at 96dB @ 1m:
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Harmonic Distortion at 102dB @ 1m:
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Dynamic Range (Instantaneous Compression Test)
The below graphic indicates just how much SPL is lost (compression) or gained (enhancement; usually due to distortion) when the speaker is played at higher output volumes instantly via a 2.7 second logarithmic sine sweep referenced to 76dB at 1 meter. The signals are played consecutively without any additional stimulus applied. Then normalized against the 76dB result.
The tests are conducted in this fashion:
  1. 76dB at 1 meter (baseline; black)
  2. 86dB at 1 meter (red)
  3. 96dB at 1 meter (blue)
  4. 102dB at 1 meter (purple)
The purpose of this test is to illustrate how much (if at all) the output changes as a speaker’s components temperature increases (i.e., voice coils, crossover components) instantaneously.
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Long Term Compression Tests
The below graphics indicate how much SPL is lost or gained in the long-term as a speaker plays at the same output level for 2 minutes, in intervals. Each graphic represents a different SPL: 86dB and 96dB both at 1 meter.
The purpose of this test is to illustrate how much (if at all) the output changes as a speaker’s components temperature increases (i.e., voice coils, crossover components).
The tests are conducted in this fashion:
  1. “Cold” logarithmic sine sweep (no stimulus applied beforehand)
  2. Multitone stimulus played at desired SPL/distance for 2 minutes; intended to represent music signal
  3. Interim logarithmic sine sweep (no stimulus applied beforehand) (Red in graphic)
  4. Multitone stimulus played at desired SPL/distance for 2 minutes; intended to represent music signal
  5. Final logarithmic sine sweep (no stimulus applied beforehand) (Blue in graphic)
The red and blue lines represent changes in the output compared to the initial “cold” test.
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Parting / Random Thoughts

If you want to see the music I use for evaluating speakers subjectively, see my Spotify playlist.
  • Subjective listening was done in my living room at a listening distance of about 4 meters from the speakers. The speakers were placed from the wall behind them about 1 meter and many meters from sidewalls. Power was provided via Parasound HINT-6 (rated ~160w x2 @ 8ohm, 240w x2 @ 4ohm). SPL levels generally remained in the 85dB region but I did occasionally increase the output level to test the limits (more on this below). Aiming varied from on-axis to cross-firing by about 20 degrees and toed-out by about 10 degrees. Generally, I preferred cross-firing by about 10 degrees. No DSP was added; my goal is to assess the performance of the speaker without “room correction” or other DSP in the signal path (other than some tonal adjustments; noted below).
  • Rolled off below 100Hz? No midbass (definitely no kick). Definitely needs a subwoofer.
  • Lower vocal regions sound thin.
  • Can be sibilant (Kodachrome).
  • Hi-hat a bit strong (2-3dB) (Kodachrome).
  • Soundstage isn’t wide. Low/no envelopment.
  • Strong around 400-600Hz (Everybody Wants to Rule the World).
  • Free Fallin - left guitar around 50 seconds moves around the soundstage from just outside the speaker to at the speaker; should stay put; radiation mismatch ?

First thing is first: these speakers can flat out hammer. At my listening distance of about 4 meters, I had my Parasound HINT-6 not even full tilt and the output measured in the seated position was 111dB. For effect…. one-hundred-eleven. That’s insane. At this level, I literally was wearing hearing protection (gun suppression). Even with the suppressors on, the music at my ears was incredibly loud. This is “wake the neighbors up on the other end of town” loud. If your seated position is within a few meters of the speakers then these, honestly, would probably be overkill. Though, one could potentially run these off an AVR and still have plenty of headroom to wake the dead.


The dynamic capability of these speakers is - as expected - quite high. With a measured (anechoic) sensitivity of about 96dB @ 2.83v/1m, they have the ability to take a little power and make a lot of sound. Along the same lines, these speakers suffer zero compression with even continuous playback of 96dB multitone stimulus featuring a crest factor of 12dB (in other words, these speakers can play loud for a while and not change in response). Of course, with high sensitivity comes a trade-off and in this case it is namely in low frequency. Despite their size and use of dual 10-inch woofers, these speakers don’t have much about at all below 100Hz. Expect to use a subwoofer at least as high as the typical 80Hz and expect that you may need to go a bit higher to properly sum to these speakers and provide the same sort of SPL levels from low frequencies to high frequencies.


The horizontal radiation window is rather narrow compared to conventional speakers, especially dome tweeters on a flat baffle design. Where those designs are typically capable of a radiation pattern as much as ±70°, these speakers are closer to the ±30° window. This, too, is another tradeoff of the waveguide-design where you gain more controlled dispersion with higher sensitivity at a detriment to wide dispersion. Personally, I prefer a wider soundstage and I prefer the interaction with the side walls as it increases the overall sense of soundstage width. But not everyone likes that and - aside from personal preference - the room may play better to a narrower directivity speaker. This is precisely the kind of thing that takes experience and data to begin to resolve. But, once you have had enough experience with measured speakers, you can begin to correlate to the relationship between soundstage width, radiation patterns and what you like.


While the measurements validate some issues I heard - namely the high frequency boost and the midrange issues - the overall result was pleasing. For home theater junkies, I believe equalization will be used which will/can help resolve some issues regarding overall tonal balance they may find displeasing. Still, unlike the DIYSG HTM-12v1 I tested recently, this speaker will not benefit as much from equalization due to the asymmetry in the horizontal radiation pattern; meaning that what is EQ’d on-axis will also impact the off-axis sound and since these two do not always follow the same form in response, some issues cannot be “EQ’d out”.


Using the tonal balance knobs on the Parasound HINT-6, I decreased the treble and found that to help remedy the sibilance. Though, the next step for me would definitely be to work on the midrange trough; either by using a wide-Q filter centered at about 300Hz to bring this up and/or using a filter with a Q of about 3, centered at about 700Hz and cut this by 2-3dB to flatten this peaky region out.


As for placement, as I mentioned above, I personally found that toeing in these speakers by about 10° yielded the best overall response. However, if you do use DSP or something of the sort to alter the frequency response, you may find a different axis response better suits your tastes/needs. So, it is recommended to take time to listen at different angles. Even more so, take time to run your room correction software at different speaker aiming angles to find what you prefer most. Aside from the horizontal aiming, though, the vertical position of your ears to the speakers should be in-line with the midpoint between the tweeter and midrange drivers. Specifically, it appears the acoustic center (vertically) is just below the tweeter line. I would not recommend listening more than ±10° beyond this axis as the vertical response begins shifting a good bit from nominal.


At any rate: these speakers get loud and are a blast to listen to. Would I consider them high-fidelity? No. But I don’t think anyone who is looking at these speakers and looking at the price for all the parts to build them are expecting symphony-hall-esque reproduction. What you do get is a great time, a speaker that will plain knock your socks off and a grin on your face. And with a little bit of EQ you can take what I would consider “good” response to “solid” response. How’s that for subjective?! That’s it for me!

Peace!

Support / Donate
If you like what you see here and want to help me keep it going, please consider donating via the PayPal Contribute button below. Donations help me pay for new items to test, materials to build rigs to measure, a chicken sandwich, server space, etc. All of which I pay out of pocket. So, if you can help chip in a few bucks, know that it is very much appreciated and that the support means a lot to me.
 

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What you do get is a great time, a speaker that will plain knock your socks off and a grin on your face.
I went from my Energy RC-70's to the 1099 and this summed up my entire experience!

Love the review and maybe I totally want to try that "filter with a Q of about 3, centered at about 700Hz and cut this by 2-3dB to flatten the peak region out" as I did find that toeing them in a bit more than my Energy speakers was ideal for me as you noted they sounded better to yourself.

Looking forward to reading comments from users that understand your charts as I don't grasp what's good/bad, lol.

Thanks!
 

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Thanks for your testing--much appreciated!

Correct me if I'm wrong, I thought Curt (up Canada way) designed the 1099. Anyhoo, very interested in what the side-by-side mids do as far as dispersion--now I know! Makes sense, the D'Appolito narrows the vertical dispersion so the 1099 placement would narrow the horizontal...such is typical with that alignment as vertical line arrays take it to the extreme.

I think there is a mod on the crossover to trim back the compression driver a few dB--now it is starting to make sense to me.

Throw a bit of EQ in the mix and that speaker will pin your ears back on AVR power. Think of all the electricity you will save! :D I'm not too loud, I'm green! Now, how to figure out taking your green speakers off your taxes--point to ponder.

Overall, a bit of EQ and it should be quite the HT speaker--now to get a bunch of subs to keep up. One day when I grow up and put my big boy pants on...one day. :)
 

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Excellect review as always, i think Ryan Bouma designed both the Elusive 1099 and the Aggressive 1299:
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Excellect review as always, i think Ryan Bouma designed both the Elusive 1099 and the Aggressive 1299:
Yea, that was a carryover from the volt review. I just fixed it.
 

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Copy/paste from my website. If the format doesn't transfer well, again, go to my website:


DIYSG 1099 Speaker Review
  • Monday, Jun 7, 2021
<snip>

At any rate: these speakers get loud and are a blast to listen to. Would I consider them high-fidelity? No. But I don’t think anyone who is looking at these speakers and looking at the price for all the parts to build them are expecting symphony-hall-esque reproduction. What you do get is a great time, a speaker that will plain knock your socks off and a grin on your face. And with a little bit of EQ you can take what I would consider “good” response to “solid” response. How’s that for subjective?! That’s it for me!

Peace!

Support / Donate
If you like what you see here and want to help me keep it going, please consider donating via the PayPal Contribute button below. Donations help me pay for new items to test, materials to build rigs to measure, a chicken sandwich, server space, etc. All of which I pay out of pocket. So, if you can help chip in a few bucks, know that it is very much appreciated and that the support means a lot to me.
Thanks for the thorough and detailed review... especially the objective measurements.

and... methinks this will be kicking the hornets nest... compared to the HTM... the Murder Hornets! :ROFLMAO:


on a more serious note, back in the day when this and a number of the Fusion/HTM designs were getting traction, there was a lot of comparison to the JTR models.

I always wondered if you really could get "hi-fi" quality sound at the efficiency design these speakers are made for. Makes me also wonder if any commercial designs get there as well. It would be interesting to see how the 1099, HTM compare to something like the JTR Noesis 210.
 

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@bikinpunk, your Parting / Random Thoughts seemed to be more extensive on this speaker than on others you've tested. This will be welcomed by less technical readers who may not fully understand how all the measurements would relate to what they would hear with their own ears. I think the way you acknowledged the stronger points of this speaker first before getting into the weaker areas is a good way to lessen angry reactions from fans of the speaker who may take offense at up-front criticism leading the listening impressions section.

One question that all these PA driver based DIYSG speaker tests brings up is how they compare to commercial PA speakers. The philosophy at DIYSG has been that using home audio quality crossovers with PA drivers could improve home audio performance over commercial PA speakers. Measuring a commercial PA speaker or two with similar drivers could help set more of a baseline for DIYSG to improve upon. While some commercial PA speakers have been successfully used in home theaters there has been a lack of thorough measurement that a Klippel could provide.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
FWIW, I shared the review link on my Facebook group page last night and Ryan Bouma (the designer) replied with the following:
“Just read the review. Exactly what I expected. Especially the comments about eq and dynamic range. These were designed during a HT trend that emphasized use of subs cranked up real hot, use of dsp eq to maximize the native sensitivity, dynamic output that will knock your face off, and finally people were asking for something that could be put under a tv or solid screen and 10” was the max most people were willing to accept in terms of form factor. I’m not sure those trends are still the prevailing method of HT audio setup. I certainly don’t exactly subscribe to it, but I use an AT screen and don’t see myself ever changing that.

On my original post about these on AVS forum I mention using eq to cut the 3khz range. That definitely helps I find. It’s such a sensitive region and it beams a bit there too. If someone like a laid back sound they could even use a shelf filter starting around 3khz and up.

Thanks Erin Hardison for your hard work on this.”
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
@bikinpunk, your Parting / Random Thoughts seemed to be more extensive on this speaker than on others you've tested.
Ironically, I wasn't even going to type much. It was 11pm, I was tired and I wanted to go to bed. I usually create the videos so I can talk about the speaker performance and save myself the time of typing up a bunch of stuff. But, I started typing up some random thoughts and 15 minutes later realized I had written multiple paragraphs. Go figure.
 

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Thanks for the review! I'll be honest I don't fully understand all the technical aspects of these reviews but it is still informative. I've had my sights on the DIYSG 1099's for quite some time as my next LCR's but due to shortages haven't been able to get ahold of them. As time goes by, I'm leaning more and more towards something prebuilt, such as some PSA MTM-210's or maybe trying to find some used JTR's down the road. The 1099's do seem like really good value, I just wonder how much of a difference it would be vs some of those other options without having to build them myself (i'd definitely do the flat packs but still it would be nice to not have to worry about any errors on my part when assembling these and then having no idea what the issue was). Either way, not to derail this thread, appreciate you providing this data to the forums.
 

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Thanks for the review! I'll be honest I don't fully understand all the technical aspects of these reviews but it is still informative. I've had my sights on the DIYSG 1099's for quite some time as my next LCR's but due to shortages haven't been able to get ahold of them. As time goes by, I'm leaning more and more towards something prebuilt, such as some PSA MTM-210's or maybe trying to find some used JTR's down the road. The 1099's do seem like really good value, I just wonder how much of a difference it would be vs some of those other options without having to build them myself (i'd definitely do the flat packs but still it would be nice to not have to worry about any errors on my part when assembling these and then having no idea what the issue was). Either way, not to derail this thread, appreciate you providing this data to the forums.
I am with you on the review, loved reading the Parting / Random Thoughts bullet points as the technical charts elude me.
I ordered the flat packs as well and built 95% of my 1099's with my step dad behind my couch with towels on the floor! I have not soldered anything since shop class grade 9 (mid 30's now) so don't let that put you off as the people on this site provide so much help along the way.

Those JTR speakers have always been intriguing to me, price scared me off big time, lol.
 

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OT but..
I love this sentence: "I ordered the flat packs as well and built 95% of my 1099's with my step dad behind my couch with towels on the floor! "
That's one seemingly exotic and versatile assortment of things for DIY!
I had to settle for getting a full sized panel saw . .
reminds me of
It was a dark and stormy night . . .
and
A man was seen running down the road chasing a cat with a broom in his pajamas.
understanding the review- above my paygrade-
but -happily well vested / immersed in DIYSG splendor . .
back to work
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·

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Excellent work, @bikinpunk. I've had my 1099 center channel running since mid-2014 and my two front towers since 2015. This review sums up what I have experienced over these years very well. My room setup has been less than ideal in the house we moved into in 2017, but I am still a proud owner of my beautiful 1099's and the work I put into them.

As a side note, I've had several conversations with Ryan over the years and he's not only a very talented designer, but also a genuinely great guy. His comments on your FB page definitely show this. The same goes for Matt Grant. We are very lucky to have such talented, humble and generous designers to help us DIY folks along the way AND talented and committed folks like you to measure, analyze and provide valuable data to help us go even further! Thank you.
 

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my 1099s are my favorite speakers ever. These are my end game. Love them.
 
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Thanks for the review! I'll be honest I don't fully understand all the technical aspects of these reviews but it is still informative. I've had my sights on the DIYSG 1099's for quite some time as my next LCR's but due to shortages haven't been able to get ahold of them. As time goes by, I'm leaning more and more towards something prebuilt, such as some PSA MTM-210's or maybe trying to find some used JTR's down the road. The 1099's do seem like really good value, I just wonder how much of a difference it would be vs some of those other options without having to build them myself (i'd definitely do the flat packs but still it would be nice to not have to worry about any errors on my part when assembling these and then having no idea what the issue was). Either way, not to derail this thread, appreciate you providing this data to the forums.
the 1099s will make you very happy.
 

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We need every speaker tested like this! I love it. Data is king and so helpful in figuring things out. Do you list max level of each speaker as I noticed it on others. I would love to get my diy speakers tested to help me tweek things.
Anyways, keep up the good work!
 

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