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SE Michigan finally gets not one, but two Cinema DLP rigs:

http://www.freep.com/news/metro/star7_20020507.htm



Gitesh Pandya's comments re: the time frame for digital cinema replacing film seems off the mark (I think digital will supplant film in most theaters in less than 10 years).


Roger Ebert's comments seem silly, too, re: "examining the way a viewer's brain responds to the video as opposed to the film image.


"There's a theory that people enter a hypnotic state when watching video," he said. "When you replace celluloid, you may be giving" movie patrons "an experience they didn't know they were getting."



Huh?
 

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The 60hz, 30 interlaced frame system of the NTSC video system..is a AUTO-HYPNOTIC to the human response system. Some are more affected by it than others.


It is interesting to note that the perfect frequency for stopping the human heart is at almost exactly 60hz. the NTSC system is at 60 hz, and has a divisor thrown in for good measure. (sub-harmonic). Video does have the capacity to 'stun' people, yes.


Although, what this has to do with the progressive frame system of a DLP cinema machine.... I have no idea. As well, the DLP cinema machine operates totally unlike any standard video machine. The panels are actuated in a quite different manner than compared to standard video, or film framing systems.


Does anyone remember the freq. that strobing systems are to stay away from? In commercial use, there is a frequency band it is illegal for them (strobing systems) to operate at, or near. I believe it is 12 hz at the center of that band. Interestingly, 48hz (24 frames,actually, just double shuttered) and 60hz are both multiples of the danger freq.


This frequency (more like 11.5hz or thereabouts) causes epileptic seizures.
 

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The problem with technology adoption predictions is that they are almost by definition wildly off. DVD was "supposed" to be adopted quite a bit quicker in terms of home market penetration, but it sold under half of most predictions. I think it was much worse for PC penetration predictions for a long time.


I don't see a total replacement of film projection systems until costs drop dramatically. A $1500 per screen print reduction in distribution cost savings is offset by a $200,000 per reciever, not to mention costs of replacing the projector. Even if the per-print costs droped to $0, it would take 100 movies to pay back for it, as it sits, break-even is at about 400 movies, and that's not counting the time-cost-of-money.
 

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JeffDM - While I agree the total replacement needs a large drop in price, a large infusion could be more cost effective for the big Cineplexes with a bit of a subsidy from studios, distributors or a third party.


I look at your math a bit differently. :)


Say the distributor saves $1500 per copy of film they don't need to send out (it is more but we will use your number :) ) and the receiver costs $200,000. This receiver can be used for all the movies for a Cineplex. For example, a 10 screen Cineplex can receive a single copy of 10 different movies on one receiver. The distributor saves $15,000 every XXX weeks as it doesn't need to send out 10 new prints to replace the worn prints. This looks like it reduces the time to pay for the equipment but only the distributor reaps the benefits. The people buying the receiver, disk array and projectors (the theater owners) need to get some of this money to offset their initial costs.


IMHO. :)
 

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You do have a point. Some numbers are missing in the overall picture though, such as the cost of the digital projectors used, which is definitely a per-screen cost. Something unknown to me is the differences in maintainance costs, whether that would be better for digital or not. I imagine that as film projectors wear out, it would make most sense to replace it with digital rather than a film unit, but if the projector is still is in good functional shape and paid for, it may not be so wise.


I wasn't sure if one reciever could do all the duty or if a larger facility would need more than one. The cost of data storage per movie is something of a question as well, and whether that storage would require two separate copies or the same copy could be read by more than one projector at a time.
 
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