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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I saw a Samsung DLP TV over the weekend and was pretty impressed with the picture quality. Are there over brands that make a DLP TV? If so, how do they compare with the Samsung models? Is DLP the best option right now, or are there other TV types I should look at for a high quality picture?
 

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You should look at other technologies as well, such as CRT RPTV's, LCD RPTV's and LCOS.


Panasonic released a couple of DLP TV's but they have been discontinued.

Optoma, RCA, and LG is the three manufacturers that I know of that has DLP TV's in their pipe line for the future.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the feedback so far. The size I am looking for is around 50". The LCOS sounds interesting, but it seems pretty pricey. Can you tell the difference bewteen 1080i & 720p? Also, it looks like I may have three different DVI components (PC, DVD, & SAT). Does anyone make a switcher box?


It also looks like the newer Samsung sets (HLN567W & HLN467W) support discreet codes for on/off inputs. What can I do with this feature?
 

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Coyote Waits
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Quote:
Originally posted by hdtvmartini
Thanks for the feedback so far. The size I am looking for is around 50". The LCOS sounds interesting, but it seems pretty pricey. Can you tell the difference bewteen 1080i & 720p? Also, it looks like I may have three different DVI components (PC, DVD, & SAT). Does anyone make a switcher box?


It also looks like the newer Samsung sets (HLN567W & HLN467W) support discreet codes for on/off inputs. What can I do with this feature?
Affordable switches are coming.


All Samsung DLP sets being built now have discrete commands as far as we know. If you get old stock you might get one without discrete commands. Anything built in September or later should have them. Sets built in August should too.


If you have a programmable remote you can control your components with a single button press. One draw back is that the Samsung DLPs have a dead period as they power up when they don't detect remote commands.


For instance you could have a button for DVD movies. By pressing that button you would turn on the TV, wait 20 seconds for warm up and then select the input your DVD is connected to. Then the Receiver would be turned on and the correct audio would be selected. Then the DVD player would be turned on and the door opened, and so on.


Discrete commands make that kind of control possible.


Also discrete commands don't act as toggles. If you issue a command to turn on a component that is already on nothing happens.
 

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720p is better for sports (fast motion) and is also broadcast bandwidth friendly (less compression occurs w/720p). I also saw an interesting article where perceived PQ was studied and the key factors in ranked order were :


#1 Contrast (~65% weighting)

#2 Resolution (~22% weighting)

#3 Brightness (~13% weighting)


Ken
 

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Philips' LCOS sets at retailers don't look nearly as good as DLP or LCD sets in my experience. LCOS seems to have all the drawbacks of both DLP (rainbows) and LCD (watered-down blacks) but the benefits of neither.
 

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I've had the HLM507 since last December and very happy with it. It does not have discrete codes but I've found a workaround with a macros using a PDA (every on sequence has an off sequence that is the reverse of the on sequence so you return to a known state).


My opinion is that you should always get a unit that is capable of displaying HDTV in its native format. Most screens on the market do not display HDTV in native format. They take a 720p or 1080i and downtranslate to the best native mode the display can produce - often between 500 and 600 lines for the flat plasma displays everyone raves about. That is still much better than what most people are used to but not as good as the real thing.


DLPs are good for several reasons. Unlike CRTs, they don't degrade. When you replace the bulb, your system is like new as long as you are not in a smoky or dusty environment (by contrast, CRT phosphors fade and LCDs have some life issues).


DLP rear projection units are cheaper than DLP front projection. In a controlled room (dedicated theater) the slight inferiority over CRT is not noticable. DLP rear projection units take up much less front-rear space and can easily be carred by two people. Large CRT systems can easily weigh over 300 pounds and some are too big to go down basement stairways.


Finally, all consumer DLPs use a single light source therefore there are no convergence issues. There used to be a "rainbow" problem but this has been largely eliminated by use of higher speed wheels.


My ideal would be DLP front projection. However I can get rear projection for $4k versus $10-14k for front projection.


These are just my personal preferences. Your milage may vary.
 

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If you are wanting to know more on DLP Television makers and the technology itself.... the best way is to start from the DLP maker website ... it.com or dpl.com


It will have listing of who makes what Televisions using the DLP technology.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by CupertinoSlim
Philips' LCOS sets at retailers don't look nearly as good as DLP or LCD sets in my experience. LCOS seems to have all the drawbacks of both DLP (rainbows) and LCD (watered-down blacks) but the benefits of neither.
Au contraire. According to the experts, LCOS is the best of both DLP and LCD technologies without most of the drawbacks of either. To quote Evan Powell from Projectorcentral.com :


"LCOS projectors have several key advantages over the more popular technologies. First, due partly to inherent high resolution, and partly to high fill factors (minimal space between pixels) on the chips, visible pixelation on an LCOS machine is nonexistent."


Second, with LCOS the pixel edges tend to be smoother compared to the sharp edges of the micro-mirrors in DLP. This gives them an analog-like response, whereas micro-mirrors add high frequencies that accentuate their digital nature. In practical terms, this gives the LCOS image a smoother, more natural look and feel, while DLP tends to impart a synthetic sharpness to the image that some would describe as harsh.


Third, LCOS and LCD projectors deliver continuous red, green and blue simultaneously onto the screen. Single-chip DLPs deliver color sequentially, alternating between red, green, and blue one color at a time. Though DLP projectors can be capable of delivering rich, well saturated colors, both LCOS and LCD products tend to be superior in this regard. We believe this is due to the way color is managed sequentially in the DLP machines.


Fourth, the absence of a color wheel means there is no chance of you or anyone you invite into your theater being bothered by rainbow artifacts, eye-strain, or headaches that some people can be susceptible to when viewing single-chip DLP projectors. "


I'll go with LCOS after the price drops a little. Also, check out GreyGhost00's take on LCOS (5-23-03).
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by technut7
Au contraire. According to the experts, LCOS is the best of both DLP and LCD technologies without most of the drawbacks of either. To quote Evan Powell from Projectorcentral.com :

I don't think the quote was referring to the single chip Philips LCoS. I think some of the advantages refereed to would require a three chip configuration like the Toshiba LCoS RPTV.
 
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