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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, I'm new to these nas devices and I was wondering if the dns-323 have to be connected to your router via the Ethernet port at all times, or is it only during the initial configuration? I would like to place the NAS in my garage away from my router.


I have a 2nd printer I would like to use and place in the garage. My router is connected to my main pc upstairs and a printer is already there. I would like another printer in the garage as well as a NAS device for my Dune so I was hoping to kill 2 birds with 1 stone, but if the NAS has to be hooked up to the router at all times, then what I have in mind won't work.


And if it does have to be hooked up to the router at all times, then is there such a nas on the market where it could be wireless?


Please advise. Thank you in advance.
 

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Your best bet may be to purchase a wireless bridge. It is basically like a wireless router without the routing funtions. It allows you to place another set of wired ethernet ports a greater distance from the original wireless router. Most of these have 4 ethernet ports while some only have 1.
 

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Why does it have to be connected to the ethernet port of your router? Isn't that the point of a network...it is all connected. If your set up is like below you should be able to plug the NAS in anywhere on the network...


Internet > Modem > Router > Switch > (Maybe a Patch Panel) > Ports around the house.


All of these ports are essentially hooked to your router.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by chpwaman /forum/post/18204473


Why does it have to be connected to the ethernet port of your router? Isn't that the point of a network...it is all connected. If your set up is like below you should be able to plug the NAS in anywhere on the network...


Internet > Modem > Router > Switch > (Maybe a Patch Panel) > Ports around the house.


All of these ports are essentially hooked to your router.

Well that's what I'm asking since I don't know much about these things. I read the DNS-323 manual and it says to plug the ethernet cable to the router for set-up. So my question is after set-up... Can I unplug the ethernet and place the NAS anywere with a power outlet?
 

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I think they all say to plug them into the router. As long as all of your internet connections around the house feed back to a switch that is connected to your router...you can plug the NAS in anywhere and the network will recognize it.


It has to be connected to the internet to work as it was designed (network storage)...I can't tell from your post, but it seems that you are wanting to set-up the NAS and then just move it to the garage and only have it powered...not hooked up to your network/internet.


Are you looking for true network storage or just a way to feed your dune content? I'm not sure I fully understand what you are trying to do.
 

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Not to hijack the thread, but I was wondering if anyone recommends or discourages using the D-Link DNS-323 with the Dune 3.0. I'm looking for a NAS to work well with my Dune and was considering the 323, but figured I'd ask before making the purchase.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by chpwaman /forum/post/18207480


I think they all say to plug them into the router. As long as all of your internet connections around the house feed back to a switch that is connected to your router...you can plug the NAS in anywhere and the network will recognize it.


It has to be connected to the internet to work as it was designed (network storage)...I can't tell from your post, but it seems that you are wanting to set-up the NAS and then just move it to the garage and only have it powered...not hooked up to your network/internet.


Are you looking for true network storage or just a way to feed your dune content? I'm not sure I fully understand what you are trying to do.

Yes, I want it to feed the Dune and I also want it to be a central location for all my pcs to share and retrieve data. For example, my notebook can tap into the internet with it's wireless card, it does not need to be plugged into the router or modem. So I guess that's what I'm asking. Do NAS devices work the same way? Can I put it in my garage where there is a power outlet, turn it on, and my pcs in the house will see it? Or, does it need to be connected to any other "hardware?"


I know these must be stupid questions.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by aronsonstack /forum/post/18207691


Yes, I want it to feed the Dune and I also want it to be a central location for all my pcs to share and retrieve data. For example, my notebook can tap into the internet with it's wireless card, it does not need to be plugged into the router or modem. So I guess that's what I'm asking. Do NAS devices work the same way? Can I put it in my garage where there is a power outlet, turn it on, and my pcs in the house will see it? Or, does it need to be connected to any other "hardware?"


I know these must be stupid questions.

If you want your network to see the NAS it has to be connected to the network somehow. You could use methods mentioned here but I recommend hard wiring for the best results.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by chance6021 /forum/post/18208980


If you want your network to see the NAS it has to be connected to the network somehow. You could use methods mentioned here but I recommend hard wiring for the best results.

Ditto to what chance said...the NAS doesn't need to be connected to any hardware, but it does need to be connected to your network somehow.


As long as your network ports around the house feed back to a switch that is hooked up to your router, then you can put the NAS anywhere and all of your computers on the network can see it...whether they connect via a wired or wireless connection. You can put the NAS in a closet if you want (as long as it is also plugged into your network/internet).


I guess a good question to ask is what is your current set-up. You mention a PC in the house and wireless notebook...is the rest of the house "networked/wired" or do you just have the PC hooked up to the router upstairs and connect to the internet via DSL or a cable modem and the router feeds wireless to the notebook. The rest of the house being "networked/wired" is going to determine how you use the NAS at a remote location (away from the router).
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by chpwaman /forum/post/18209033


Ditto to what chance said...the NAS doesn't need to be connected to any hardware, but it does need to be connected to your network somehow.


As long as your network ports around the house feed back to a switch that is hooked up to your router, then you can put the NAS anywhere and all of your computers on the network can see it...whether they connect via a wired or wireless connection. You can put the NAS in a closet if you want (as long as it is also plugged into your network/internet).


I guess a good question to ask is what is your current set-up. You mention a PC in the house and wireless notebook...is the rest of the house "networked/wired" or do you just have the PC hooked up to the router upstairs and connect to the internet via DSL or a cable modem and the router feeds wireless to the notebook. The rest of the house being "networked/wired" is going to determine how you use the NAS at a remote location (away from the router).

Not sure what switch and ports mean, but I have verizon fios for internet, tv and phone. The router is connected to one PC via ethernet upstairs. I have 2 other pcs and 1 notebook which all tap into it wirelessly. There is a Verizon main box which they have installed in my garage.
 

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FIOS is just how your internet is being sent to your house, via fiber optics as opposed to cable or DSL (phone line).


It sounds like you don't have the rest of the house wired, you just have the one PC hooked to the internet via the router and the router feeds the laptops.


If you don't have ethernet ports/jacks (look like phone jacks) around the house that you can just plug a computer into to get on the internet, then your house isn't "wired/networked". Doesn't mean you don't have the proper cat5/6 cable feeding your phone jacks, but currently you are not set up to just plug your NAS in anywhere (at least it doesn't sound like it). So, the best or I should say easiest solution for you is the wireless bridge suggested earlier...this would allow you to put your NAS in the garage and have it be visible by all of your computers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by chpwaman /forum/post/18212153


FIOS is just how your internet is being sent to your house, via fiber optics as opposed to cable or DSL (phone line).


It sounds like you don't have the rest of the house wired, you just have the one PC hooked to the internet via the router and the router feeds the laptops.


If you don't have ethernet ports/jacks (look like phone jacks) around the house that you can just plug a computer into to get on the internet, then your house isn't "wired/networked". Doesn't mean you don't have the proper cat5/6 cable feeding your phone jacks, but currently you are not set up to just plug your NAS in anywhere (at least it doesn't sound like it). So, the best or I should say easiest solution for you is the wireless bridge suggested earlier...this would allow you to put your NAS in the garage and have it be visible by all of your computers.

Thanks! However, for Dune streaming, would you suggest it to be wired to the router for best results? Does it matter? If it does matter, then the one solution I have is to split the cable coming from the verizon main box, and plug it into the router and leave my router in the garage. Make all pcs in house wireless. Now, I can have my nas in the garage connected to the router via ethernet.


Another possibility is that may not require me to move the router into the garage is that the Verizon Main Box in the garage actually has a few ethernet sockets. It is labeled "for testing only" so I'm not sure if I can simply plug it in and get internet.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by aronsonstack /forum/post/18212333


Thanks! However, for Dune streaming, would you suggest it to be wired to the router for best results? Does it matter? If it does matter, then the one solution I have is to split the cable coming from the verizon main box, and plug it into the router and leave my router in the garage. Make all pcs in house wireless. Now, I can have my nas in the garage connected to the router via ethernet.


Another possibility is that may not require me to move the router into the garage is that the Verizon Main Box in the garage actually has a few ethernet sockets. It is labeled "for testing only" so I'm not sure if I can simply plug it in and get internet.

I don't think it matters...you just need to have your dune be able to find the NAS on your network. I think option one or the wireless bridge idea is your best bet. I don't think you can just plug your NAS into an open port on the main box and have it be visible to your network...you need to have the NAS connected "down stream" from your router (if you aren't using a switch)...if that makes sense. Otherwise your just hooking your NAS up to the internet, but not YOUR network...I'm not 100% on that because I don't know anything about the FIOS box.


Do you know if your house is wired with at least Cat5e cable? If it is...it probably wouldn't be hard for someone with a little knowledge to come in and get your whole house wired up...as long as all of your Cat lines terminate to a bridge somewhere (usually the basement)...you could have the FIOS feed the whole house or just certain areas of the house with a simple switch and router.


I am wired with all Cat5e (Cat6 in my basement) and I have the majority of my rooms just wired for regular phone use, but I have my phone jack in the office wired with a RJ45 (Ethernet Jack) and this line in the basement plugs into my switch which is connected to my router. I just pulled the office line off of the phone bridge in the basement and connected to my switch. Google any of these terms and you will get pictures to help you locate your phone bridge for example.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by chpwaman /forum/post/18214272


I don't think it matters...you just need to have your dune be able to find the NAS on your network. I think option one or the wireless bridge idea is your best bet. I don't think you can just plug your NAS into an open port on the main box and have it be visible to your network...you need to have the NAS connected "down stream" from your router (if you aren't using a switch)...if that makes sense. Otherwise your just hooking your NAS up to the internet, but not YOUR network...I'm not 100% on that because I don't know anything about the FIOS box.


Do you know if your house is wired with at least Cat5e cable? If it is...it probably wouldn't be hard for someone with a little knowledge to come in and get your whole house wired up...as long as all of your Cat lines terminate to a bridge somewhere (usually the basement)...you could have the FIOS feed the whole house or just certain areas of the house with a simple switch and router.


I am wired with all Cat5e (Cat6 in my basement) and I have the majority of my rooms just wired for regular phone use, but I have my phone jack in the office wired with a RJ45 (Ethernet Jack) and this line in the basement plugs into my switch which is connected to my router. I just pulled the office line off of the phone bridge in the basement and connected to my switch. Google any of these terms and you will get pictures to help you locate your phone bridge for example.

Thanks! Learning something new everyday. I got confused because my ps3, my epson 600 printer, my tivos... they all can tap into my internet wirelessly. I thought NAS devices connect wirelessly too. I haven't bought the dns-323 yet, but I read the online manual first and when it said you have to connect the ethernet cable, I knew I couldn't put this thing in the garage. I think I will go with the Netgear WNHDEB111-100NAS Wireless N Access Point.


One last important question... My router has a 1 WAN slot and 4 LAN slots. When I'm plugging in the bridge, which slot do I use? And just for the sake of more education, how come the WAN slot is not occupied? I remember when I used to have Charter Communications, the cable went into a modem and the modem connects to the router's WAN slot. I had 2 items, a router and a modem. With Verizon, I have just this 1 router, the cable goes into this router and that's all I need. So is this a modem/router all in one?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by aronsonstack /forum/post/18214875


Thanks! Learning something new everyday. I got confused because my ps3, my epson 600 printer, my tivos... they all can tap into my internet wirelessly. I thought NAS devices connect wirelessly too. I haven't bought the dns-323 yet, but I read the online manual first and when it said you have to connect the ethernet cable, I knew I couldn't put this thing in the garage. I think I will go with the Netgear WNHDEB111-100NAS Wireless N Access Point.


One last important question... My router has a 1 WAN slot and 4 LAN slots. When I'm plugging in the bridge, which slot do I use? And just for the sake of more education, how come the WAN slot is not occupied? I remember when I used to have Charter Communications, the cable went into a modem and the modem connects to the router's WAN slot. I had 2 items, a router and a modem. With Verizon, I have just this 1 router, the cable goes into this router and that's all I need. So is this a modem/router all in one?


I believe the WAN on the FIOS comes in via a coax cable...so the WAN ethernet port would be unused. I think the Netgear Access Point is a good choice...you should hook one of the pair to a LAN port on your router and you can plug your NAS and dune into the other in the garage. You must have a modem/router combo if that is the only device in the house.
 

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I don't know what your primary use of the NAS will be, but I would HIGHLY recommend you just leave it connected directly to the router. I mean what's the point of throwing it in the garage? It needs to be connected to a network port no matter where you put it, and the files are available to everything on your network no matter where the box is actually sitting so why not just plug it in to your router and be done with it?
 
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