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Discussion Starter #1
I was just wondering, do HDTVs, especially Samsung ones, have really rich and vivid colors? The reason I ask is because I have a Samsung Slimfit SDTV and whenever I watch in component video, the colors are really rich and vivid even though the colors are only set to midpoint, ie 50. In composite mode, the colors aren't that rich. The colors are only this vivid when watching in component mode. In fact, it's so vivid, I had to lower the colors down a bit. For those of you with HDTVs, especially a Samsung one, does your HDTV have really vivid colors? If so, did you leave it that way or did you have to lower the setting? Should colors be lowered or should they be left at the default to ensure better viewing experience?


BTW: My TV is the Samsung Slimfit TXT2082 SDTV. It has a 480i Component input and when using it, colors are very rich and vivid. The reason I asked about HDTVs because I figured that if an SDTV has such vivid colors, I can only imagine that an HDTV would be just as vivid or probably more.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by xraffle /forum/post/14252059


I was just wondering, do HDTVs, especially Samsung ones, have really rich and vivid colors? The reason I ask is because I have a Samsung Slimfit SDTV and whenever I watch in component video, the colors are really rich and vivid even though the colors are only set to midpoint, ie 50. In composite mode, the colors aren't that rich. The colors are only this vivid when watching in component mode. In fact, it's so vivid, I had to lower the colors down a bit. For those of you with HDTVs, especially a Samsung one, does your HDTV have really vivid colors? If so, did you leave it that way or did you have to lower the setting? Should colors be lowered or should they be left at the default to ensure better viewing experience?


BTW: My TV is the Samsung Slimfit TXT2082 SDTV. It has a 480i Component input and when using it, colors are very rich and vivid. The reason I asked about HDTVs because I figured that if an SDTV has such vivid colors, I can only imagine that an HDTV would be just as vivid or probably more.

The colors my (out of box) Pioneer Kuro produces is stunning
 

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Discussion Starter #3

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Originally Posted by burnsalkire /forum/post/14253319


The colors my (out of box) Pioneer Kuro produces is stunning

Stunning in what way? Rich and vivid stunning?
 

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Depends on what you call "vivid". Most sets out of the box are set to "vivid" mode so the picture looks good in showrooms where lighting is much stronger than the home environment. However, watching it in that mode would fatigue your eyes in short order. Natural looking color is what you should be after, and calibrating with a disc is the best way to get this, after setting to some other mode such as standard or cinema. Yes, the color produced on the newer sets is normally richer than what you'd get on your standard def tube.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I tried using an AVIA disc to calibrate it and it doesn't work. The default color was 50. After calibration, the color went all the way down to 30 making the colors look extremely weak and faded. I have no idea if that's considered "natural" but I buy a colored TV to see a colored picture, not an almost black and white one.


When i say vivid, I mean bright. Such as grasses turn out to be bright green.


The Vivid or Dynamic mode in all TVs have contrast set to max and sharpness set really high. I lowered them on my TV, but it's the colors that need to be changed. After researching, I read that contrast and sharpness are the ones that need to be adjusted and that colors set at the factory are usually ok.
 

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I think the best way to judge if the color is overly vivid or natural is by watching sports, Baseball in particular, we all know the color of the uniforms look like in real life and if the field looks tooo green..


sure the sharp vivid right out the box is fun at first but as said before it will put alot of strain on the eye. Once you get the natural look, it's takes a little time to get over not having that initial "punch" but once you get over that it is 10X more enjoyable.

Again I think watching a baseball game, especially your home town team, if you have one since you know first hand how vivid and natural their uniforms are, is the best way to test your results.
 

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When i say vivid, I mean bright. Such as grasses turn out to be bright green.

If your set is properly calibrated, the colors displayed will be accurate. So if the source has the "grass" color as neon green, it will look that way, but not otherwise. Most sets (HD or not) can display an oversaturated and 'vivid' picture, if that is what you prefer.


If you're used to an oversaturated/super-bright look (and this is what many TVs look like out of the box), a properly calibrated one will often look 'dull' at first. But if you watch content that really has a lot of fine detail, you can see that the oversaturated/too-bright settings are crushing color gradation and doing other bad things to the picture.

Quote:
The Vivid or Dynamic mode in all TVs have contrast set to max and sharpness set really high.

These modes often mess with color reproduction as well. "Red push" (which makes the image look "warmer" by increasing the red levels relative to green and blue) is a very common adjustment for sets to make like this.

Quote:
I tried using an AVIA disc to calibrate it and it doesn't work. The default color was 50. After calibration, the color went all the way down to 30 making the colors look extremely weak and faded. I have no idea if that's considered "natural" but I buy a colored TV to see a colored picture, not an almost black and white one.

I don't know anything about that specific TV -- but if the RGB balance is not good, then you won't be able to properly calibrate the color. Either it will be undersaturated in general, or some of the colors will be way oversaturated. This is very common in cheaper/older TVs.
 

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I want my color to look like film. Yes, HDTV has much better color than SD. It is more realistic, looks more like reality. Of course one has to adjust ones set.
 

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Discussion Starter #9

Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthias99 /forum/post/14261178


I don't know anything about that specific TV -- but if the RGB balance is not good, then you won't be able to properly calibrate the color. Either it will be undersaturated in general, or some of the colors will be way oversaturated. This is very common in cheaper/older TVs.

That's it. I just checked my color decoder with the Avia DVD and the red is the one that's exaggerated the most. Blue is a little bit less exaggerated, but green is not nearly as exaggerated as Red and Blue. So, the balance is way off between Red/Blue and Green. I was wondering why this TV is so hard to get proper, accurate colors. Thanks for bringing up the RGB balance. I was always wondering what the color decoder test was. Now, I know.
 
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