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Discussion Starter #1
I am running Klipsch (have only bought the rear surrounds but it's time to order the front speakers) in-wall speakers. I prginially tested their lowest end center channel model with their high end with the aimable tweeters. The high end speakers sounded really bad to us. It sounded like everyone was holding their noses while they were talking, and it was kind of harsh, regardless of vokume level. I bought the lower end center channels, which sound fantastic, for my rear speakers. I finally have my projector mount and lined up and it is time to purchase the front speaker. I have my screen at 120" and Im sitting roughly 11 feet back. At this distance and with such a wide screen, is it going to make a tremendous difference if I don't purchase a speaker with aimable tweeters? My center channel should be fine. It's my right and left that I'm concerned about, but if I go with the aimable version for R/L, I may as well get the same model for the center so they all sound equally nasally.

Besides my question of if I need to be concerned about aimable tweeter, does anyone own the Klipsch R-5502-W II or the R-5800-W II speakers? If so, do they sound better once their all in place, or do you also hear the kind of nasally and plastic reflecting sound I hear from these models? As I've mentioned, we love the sound quality of the non adjustable low end Klipsch. We sent the adjustable back. Now I'm trying to figure out if I just didn't give them a fair shot and need to try them again and get them out in the wall, or if they really sound as bad as my first impression.
 

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...we love the sound quality of the non adjustable low end Klipsch. We sent the adjustable back. Now I'm trying to figure out if I just didn't give them a fair shot and need to try them again and get them out in the wall, or if they really sound as bad as my first impression.
- Exactly what model numbers do you have/try?
- What did you replace the adjustable with? The non-adjustable?
If you're happy with the sound now, NO, do NOT "give them another chance" just move on with life and ENJOY what ya got! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
- Exactly what model numbers do you have/try?
- What did you replace the adjustable with? The non-adjustable?
If you're happy with the sound now, NO, do NOT "give them another chance" just move on with life and ENJOY what ya got! :)
Thank you for your response. Have you heard either of the 2 model numbers I listed?

No speakers have been replaced. 2 models I listed in the original post were purchased and tested for rear surround channels. Center, left and right still have to be purchased. It's a long shot, but I am looking for feedback from owners (or friends of owners of these models/someone who has heard them first hand) of Klipsch in wall speakers with the pivoting horn tweeter.
 

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Have you heard either of the 2 model numbers I listed?.
I did hear an all-in-wall setup at a dealer in Pasadena but don't know what models.
- The 2 you list are apples and oranges. One is using a dome tweeter, and the other a horn-loaded dome. Some people love those horns and others hate them.
- Yes, I see the more expensive one is supposed to pivot the horn 15 degrees. Keep in mind that can help aim the highest frequencies, but not the midrange. I couldn't find any measurements however I'd bet the horns cut in at a frequency higher than where the dispersion begins to narrow from the woofer.
- There are other brands that have aimable dome tweeters, but again like most all in-wall stuff you can't listen to it, nobody's heard it-it's difficult. I hope to go back to in-wall in the future (I like what eliminating a set of first reflections does to the sound) but it is indeed a crapshoot.
- What receiver do you have? Does it have any kind of room correction? That can help if the highs are low, depending on the room circumstances and the correction technology.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I did hear an all-in-wall setup at a dealer in Pasadena but don't know what models.
- The 2 you list are apples and oranges. One is using a dome tweeter, and the other a horn-loaded dome. Some people love those horns and others hate them.
- Yes, I see the more expensive one is supposed to pivot the horn 15 degrees. Keep in mind that can help aim the highest frequencies, but not the midrange. I couldn't find any measurements however I'd bet the horns cut in at a frequency higher than where the dispersion begins to narrow from the woofer.
- There are other brands that have aimable dome tweeters, but again like most all in-wall stuff you can't listen to it, nobody's heard it-it's difficult. I hope to go back to in-wall in the future (I like what eliminating a set of first reflections does to the sound) but it is indeed a crapshoot.
- What receiver do you have? Does it have any kind of room correction? That can help if the highs are low, depending on the room circumstances and the correction technology.
I believe I'm going to go with a Marantz reciever with Audyssey, because I'm also wanting to run a dual subwoofer setup and want everything to blend well. Admittedly, I'm going to probably try to get a model that is a year old so I can get a discount, but I'm not even sure which model I need. I will probably call SVS to get an opinion on that. I may call them after I send this message.

So, from what you're explaining, I may be just fine with the dome tweeters. It'd be great if I could go with an acoustically transparent screen and not have to put the speakers so far off to the side, but from the samples I've tried, AT screen have visible texture. I have to be roughly 4ft from my screen to see a pixel at 1080p. Makes me worried that these AT screens where I have to be at least 6ft back, may take some detail out of 4K images, once I decide to go 4K.

Thank you for the info. It sounds like I should be able to run the dome tweeter Klipsch as long as I have the right calibration software? It was interesting when I tested the horn loaded speaker. The sound was very narrow, or small compared to the cheaper model, and yes, I could hear every brush of cloth and other noisy details that were beginning to overpower the dialogue. The problem is that the extra sounds I could hear were what I would compare to screen noise in a movie with a dark setting and wasn't mastered properly - something that doesn't need to be seen in a film. Similarly, the amplified sounds were only amplifying sounds like smacking and random harsh sounds. It would be great for music, but of course not all shows or films have perfect noise cancellation.

Thank you very very much for your help!
 

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Why in-walls? I sounds like you have the room and budget. Why compromise? It all depends on your tolerance. You're being choosy about the difference between aimable and non-aimable and willing to pay the expense for dual subs. Aren't you concerned the compromise will eventually bother you? Not easy to undo. I suppose you could hang a picture over them.
 

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run a dual subwoofer setup...get a model that is a year old so I can get a discount
Sure! Or even a few years older. I saved a friend literally $1100 finding him an older Denon AVR-2312Ci on Craigslist. No 4k switching...who cares, we wired direct to his OLED! For dual subs, I *think* you need Audyssey XT32. On the Dirac side (mostly NAD) I'm not sure. Other room corrections are less sophisticated as far as I can tell.

So, from what you're explaining, I may be just fine with the dome tweeters.
Yes, it sounds (ha ha!) like you didn't enjoy the horns too much, and room correction quite possibly will not help that. It is not well understood why, but some research I read once makes me feel it is related to time-delayed energy coming out due to the internal shape of the horn.

So horns should really be circular or at least ellipsoidal, but are often rectangular due to trying to get coverage angles for PA use. And then, many many horns I believe just copy the look of something successful, or use ancient outmoded formulas instead of tricky modeling software. The ironic part is Klispch's now chief engineer once designed an oval horn for me! So I don't know why their horns are square or rectangular. I think it is just part of their style.

Anyway, if you pretty much like the QUALITY of sound from those dome models, they should still keep that essential quality in the room. And then Audyssey can let you tweak the upper response. (note: that might require using their app, I haven't gotten into those details too much. So any Denon/Marantz you think to buy, check if it is compatible with the Audyssey App.
https://apps.apple.com/us/app/audyssey-multeq-editor-app/id1210584625
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.dmholdings.AudysseyMultEq&hl=en
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Why in-walls? I sounds like you have the room and budget. Why compromise? It all depends on your tolerance. You're being choosy about the difference between aimable and non-aimable and willing to pay the expense for dual subs. Aren't you concerned the compromise will eventually bother you? Not easy to undo. I suppose you could hang a picture over them.
Mainly for minimal clutter, but I admit, I'm very surprised at how well in-wall units perform. Overall, the main goal is to save space between the seating position and screen, and still have a theater-like experience we wouldn't otherwise have room for.

There is quite a bit of detail to explain the reasoning behind this/please forgive me for another long message.

In short, the room is wide but shallow. The subwoofers are cylinder shaped (SVS PC models) and have a lot of placement options. It isn't so much that floorstanding speakers absolutely won't fit, but a lot has been done to free up space, especially in the den. The home itself is small. The den has essentially been doubled in size after rearranging some things, removing some things, and simply moving others.

The fireplace, brick and hearth were removed for additional space. The door leading to the garage was moved. The door leading to the backyard was removed to remove clutter of 3 doors in the front of the room. Another route to the backyard was made to make it more accessible and reduce clutter.

In a very big, dedicated theater room with a lot of depth, it would make more sense to go with a floorstanding setup. I'm honestly really impressed with the in-wall setup in my bedroom. It is a drastic improvement over the 5.1 setup I used to have that was not an in-wall setup. Low frequencies are of course taken care of by large drivers, and with advanced tuning options (Audyssey etc) these days, a sound presentation is possible that wouldn't have been possible in an in-wall setup in the past, or really wasn't possible at all.

Most traffic will be on the sides and front of the room. Floorstanding units would take up roughly 50% of walking space, because of where they would have to be positioned. They have limited positioning options vs subwoofers. The subs, being cylinder shaped, save space over a conventional box. Being round, there's more of a possibility for them be placed in the corners of the room and still allow the doors to be accessed and leave the space to walk, opened. In a worst case scenario, the subs can be put along the back wall on either side of the seating positions, serve as end tables with table cloths over them to make them functional pieces of furniture, and not protrude into any walking space. Regular floor standing speakers couldn't be tucked into the front corners because of clearance.


Sure! Or even a few years older. I saved a friend literally $1100 finding him an older Denon AVR-2312Ci on Craigslist. No 4k switching...who cares, we wired direct to his OLED! For dual subs, I *think* you need Audyssey XT32. On the Dirac side (mostly NAD) I'm not sure. Other room corrections are less sophisticated as far as I can tell.

Yes, it sounds (ha ha!) like you didn't enjoy the horns too much, and room correction quite possibly will not help that. It is not well understood why, but some research I read once makes me feel it is related to time-delayed energy coming out due to the internal shape of the horn.

So horns should really be circular or at least ellipsoidal, but are often rectangular due to trying to get coverage angles for PA use. And then, many many horns I believe just copy the look of something successful, or use ancient outmoded formulas instead of tricky modeling software. The ironic part is Klispch's now chief engineer once designed an oval horn for me! So I don't know why their horns are square or rectangular. I think it is just part of their style.

Anyway, if you pretty much like the QUALITY of sound from those dome models, they should still keep that essential quality in the room. And then Audyssey can let you tweak the upper response. (note: that might require using their app, I haven't gotten into those details too much. So any Denon/Marantz you think to buy, check if it is compatible with the Audyssey.
I got a very good recommendation from SVS yesterday, for an amp. I'm so glad I checked with them, because I always find it tough to find a reciever that has everything I need for a fair price. Marantz SR-5013 is the model. It has Audyssey XT32, 4K passthrough, 100W per channel, 7 Channels, dual sub output etc. I won't be running 4K for a while, tho. I have 1080p SONY projector, and will probably wait a few years for their laser projectors to come down in price. I'm "hoping" the CES show and all of the releases of 8K TVs will push 8K projectors, so that the cost of a really good 4K model will be more feasible. I like the idea of laser models having 20,000 hours of life on the bulb as opposed to a maximum of 6,000.

That is very interesting about the horn tweeters. It makes a lot of sense. Klipsch now has some in-wall models with are more circular horn, but I of course haven't heard them. What's interesting is that the new model is not made to pivot, but is supposed to be a better unit overall than the square.
 

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...Klipsch now has some in-wall models with are more circular horn, but I of course haven't heard them. What's interesting is that the new model is not made to pivot, but is supposed to be a better unit overall than the square.
It doesn't pivot probably because that's an expensive pain in the butt to manufacture :D Maybe they also figure most folks just don't have such extreme separation, and/or won't even think about dispersion, and/or won't even know ANYTHING about the speakers since a dealer/installer will just spec it all out.
 
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