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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I want to buy a 27" monitor for my computer. I am reading that I can buy a "cheaper" South Korean monitor that looks very good after calibration. Now I could pay nearly double for a Dell ultrasharp monitor which has been calibrated before it is sent to me. But I am thinking I want the less expensive display and calibrate it myself. What the heck, I have several other monitors, I could calibrate those as well. I would be improving the picture on all my displays.


So, I start to examine my choices. Do I buy colormunki display, or the i1 display pro? Which software do I buy?


Then I read that I can also calibrate my TV. I have a Pioneer Elite Kuro 50" display. Maybe I can use the same equipment to calibrate it as well.


But . . . do computer displays calibrate differently from HDTVs? How much time will I be spending? Do I really want to learn that much? But hey, I like a challenge, and I do want my displays to look as good as possible.


So, I have spent several hours reading, and I am now more confused than ever. As I see it, my options are the following:


1. Just spend the extra money for a Dell ultrasharp 27 " monitor. Easier and ultimately cheaper.


2. Buy (invest) in equipment and software ($500?) and I will make the money up by improving the quality on my existing Dell ultrasharp, Asus, or BenQ monitors.


3. Buy (invest) in equipment and software ($500?) and I will make the money up by improving the quality on my Kuro HDTV as well as my existing Dell ultrasharp, Asus, or BenQ monitors.


I think I need to answer this question BEFORE I get to the next question, which is which hardware/software bundle do I buy? I would appreciate some informed feedback..


John
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by UncleAelfrich  /t/1521934/do-i-want-to-buy-calibration-equipment#post_24465190


I want to buy a 27" monitor for my computer. I am reading that I can buy a "cheaper" South Korean monitor that looks very good after calibration. Now I could pay nearly double for a Dell ultrasharp monitor which has been calibrated before it is sent to me. But I am thinking I want the less expensive display and calibrate it myself. What the heck, I have several other monitors, I could calibrate those as well. I would be improving the picture on all my displays.


So, I start to examine my choices. Do I buy colormunki display, or the i1 display pro? Which software do I buy?


Then I read that I can also calibrate my TV. I have a Pioneer Elite Kuro 50" display. Maybe I can use the same equipment to calibrate it as well.


But . . . do computer displays calibrate differently from HDTVs? How much time will I be spending? Do I really want to learn that much? But hey, I like a challenge, and I do want my displays to look as good as possible.


So, I have spent several hours reading, and I am now more confused than ever. As I see it, my options are the following:


1. Just spend the extra money for a Dell ultrasharp 27 " monitor. Easier and ultimately cheaper.


2. Buy (invest) in equipment and software ($500?) and I will make the money up by improving the quality on my existing Dell ultrasharp, Asus, or BenQ monitors.


3. Buy (invest) in equipment and software ($500?) and I will make the money up by improving the quality on my Kuro HDTV as well as my existing Dell ultrasharp, Asus, or BenQ monitors.


I think I need to answer this question BEFORE I get to the next question, which is which hardware/software bundle do I buy? I would appreciate some informed feedback..


John

John,


I'll start off with a few answers...


It doesn't (really) matter if the display comes pre-caled from factory, it will drift over time so u need to take action anyways, if u need or want to use it for some sort of color critical application...


Now, one important thing to understand is that you want to buy THE BEST HARDWARE (the screens that "performs" best) - not the cheapest screen or the screen that comes pre-caled or not - clearly not all screens are the same... if the pre-caled screen is crap then it is crap, no matter if they pre-calibrated it at factory or not....


regarding calibration solutions, well that depends on the type of application... is just for PC usage... ? u wanna calibrate for HT usage as well ?


Lightspace (my recommendation) is LUT based and requires LUT hardware but can be used for ICC application with additional plugins... Calman offers an interface for traditional 6pt + cal, LUT cals and ICC based calibration.... Argyll offers ICC and (limited) LUT based calibrations, Argyll is free...


Regarding meters: the i1D3 (i1 Display Po) is the best budget meter.


Hope this helps somewhat....



- M
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
to be more clear, I wouldn't buy a monitor that did not have good reviews on a site like anandtech.. I am thinking of the Yamasaki IPS or the Qnix PLS or Monoprice Glass 2560x1440 displays. These are the A- displays that are rejected by Apple, Price from $350 to $460 for the Monoprice.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by UncleAelfrich  /t/1521934/do-i-want-to-buy-calibration-equipment#post_24465824


to be more clear, I wouldn't buy a monitor that did not have good reviews on a site like anandtech.. I am thinking of the Yamasaki IPS or the Qnix PLS or Monoprice Glass 2560x1440 displays. These are the A- displays that are rejected by Apple, Price from $350 to $460 for the Monoprice.

right but then again, ICC calibration is way inferior to LUT based calibration and the cheapest LUT based monitor is (I think) an Eizo for 1-2K+.... which is probably overkill for u, but just saying, there's more involved and u would need to specify how you want to approach calibration for each of your equipment: monitors vs. HT etc...


- M
 

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Frankly, only after I decided to finally clear it up with the 27" Dell Ultrasharp that came precalibrated did I find out how off it really was...I suggest getting at least a colormunki with basic software to at least get the white balancei correct, the gamut coverage in sRGB emulation is shockingly skewed and can't be helped in that mode...


However, it can be brought to perfection with color management in wide gamut mode while it is not clear if a cheaper monitor could....still if it is IPS and covers equal to or more than sRGB gamut and has at least WB controls you should be good....even the Dell isn't a guarantee...


Of course, the Dell uses south Korean (LG) panel...



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