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I am thinking about purchasing an RS10 or similar projector and I have a high shelf in the room where I am planning on placing the projector. Does the projector have to be upside down to work properly when it is located vertically at the top of the projected screen?


Thanks,

Mike
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by thorr /forum/post/16845544


I am thinking about purchasing an RS10 or similar projector and I have a high shelf in the room where I am planning on placing the projector. Does the projector have to be upside down to work properly when it is located vertically at the top of the projected screen?


Thanks,

Mike

Yes it should be upside down if it is up high especially if this is close to the ceiling. For an RS10/RS20 you can maximize the on/off contrast by mounting it close to the height that you will be viewing at. I would probably table mount it upright it close behind the seating area if I owned one. This would keep it cooler and give better flexibility over the setup.
 

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Mounting it at maximum throw will optimise the on\\of but lower the light output as wel introduce some lens aberrations. Avoid any mounting extreme staying about 6 inches fromany throw limit. i have noidea why mounting at screen center would maximize on\\off.

However the lens will perform best with the chip at lens center as I thinkit would be in a center screen mount position minimizing any chromatic aberrations fromthe lens (seen as non uniform misconvergence).
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mark haflich /forum/post/16846001


Mounting it at maximum throw will optimise the on\\of but lower the light output as wel introduce some lens aberrations. Avoid any mounting extreme staying about 6 inches fromany throw limit. i have noidea why mounting at screen center would maximize on\\off.

However the lens will perform best with the chip at lens center as I thinkit would be in a center screen mount position minimizing any chromatic aberrations fromthe lens (seen as non uniform misconvergence).

Unless it's being aimed at an angle, which can be done, from what I understand is that for the JVC's there is some significant loss of light output from vertical shift due to the chip. The result you get with centered mount while minimizing lens aberrations is also a tradeoff for aesthetics more than often and it gets mounted higher/further away. It also helps installers that would rather sell a mount than deal with the hassle. To maximize on/off the projector can be moved closer to the screen or further when needed as the manual IRIS is somewhat limited. These are some things to consider and simple to try before one commits to a location or mount.
 

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Thor,


The RS10/20 has an equal amount of vertical shift in the up and down direction. 80% of the screen height, I believe.


I have mine mounted right side up on a shelf at the back of the theater. Lens center even with the top of the screen. Lens center 7 inches from the ceiling. Longest throw possible.


Works great at 16:9 and zooming to 2.35 to one. No anamorphic lens needed.
 

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There are ceiling mounts that are like a shelf to sit the projector in. With most of the digital projectors having vertical shift they can be mounted either way. CRT's were entirely a different story.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by thorr /forum/post/16845544


I am thinking about purchasing an RS10 or similar projector and I have a high shelf in the room where I am planning on placing the projector. Does the projector have to be upside down to work properly when it is located vertically at the top of the projected screen?


Thanks,

Mike

With an RS10 you technically don't have to (the shift allows equal travel in both directions). But, as others have said there are some advantages to inverting it (I'll add usually easier to install if you just use a mount).


Note though that most projectors have to be...the RS10 and a handful of others are more uncommon than not (in that they technically don't have to be).
 

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my Sony VW60 is mounted "normally" (not upside down) on a motorized projector lift. It does require a tad of a lift in the rear of the unit, but does not require it be upside like my prior projector. The projector, when deployed from the ceiling, is not dead center on the screen, hence the lift in the rear of the projector.


I can provide you a picture, if needed.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mando /forum/post/16856162


my Sony VW60 is mounted "normally" (not upside down) on a motorized projector lift. It does require a tad of a lift in the rear of the unit, but does not require it be upside like my prior projector. The projector, when deployed from the ceiling, is not dead center on the screen, hence the lift in the rear of the projector.


I can provide you a picture, if needed.

So are you employing some keystoning? I ask because if you tilt up the back end you probably need to be, and that isn't recommended...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mando /forum/post/16856162


my Sony VW60 is mounted "normally" (not upside down) on a motorized projector lift. It does require a tad of a lift in the rear of the unit, but does not require it be upside like my prior projector. The projector, when deployed from the ceiling, is not dead center on the screen, hence the lift in the rear of the projector.

It probably won't make a difference if the projector was mounted inverted. There is a fair amount of lens shift in the VW60, but you really need the projector below the top of the screen. As Jason mentioned, using keystone adjustment, even +/-1, will greatly affect image quality. I calibrated one last week where the installer used keystone rather than lens shift. Removing the keystone (-18) and re-aiming the projector correctly and using lens shift, the picture was greatly improved.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by GlenC /forum/post/16862437


It probably won't make a difference if the projector was mounted inverted. There is a fair amount of lens shift in the VW60, but you really need the projector below the top of the screen. As Jason mentioned, using keystone adjustment, even +/-1, will greatly affect image quality. I calibrated one last week where the installer used keystone rather than lens shift. Removing the keystone (-18) and re-aiming the projector correctly and using lens shift, the picture was greatly improved.

Makes you wonder how these "installers" get any business at all.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason Turk /forum/post/16861814


So are you employing some keystoning? I ask because if you tilt up the back end you probably need to be, and that isn't recommended...

Jason, I've got mine currently stand mounted and the lense is probably less than 18" below screen center (CLARIFICATION-18" BELOW THE CENTER OF THE SCREEN FIELD; NOT THE FRAME BOTTOM) . I've propped the back end up with a door stop wedge so that the lense is as close to parrallel with the screen as possible, and then used the lense shift to bring the image up on the screen. I had tried doing it without the door wedge and using the appropriate lense shift, but getting the lense as straight up and down as possible with the wedge seemed to help.


I find myself still needing keystone +2. My VW60 has a minor uptick of the right upper corner; only really noticable with a 1.85 on a 1.78 screen, where the black bars are close to the screen frame, or on a test disc. Sony in Laredo said the projector is fine (or I guess within their tolerance).


Any suggestions that might square me up? I've spent many hours with physical positioning, and the door wedge and a slight keystone is about as close as I can get it (about 1/4"-1/2" high). Keystoning too much surely makes the problem appear at the bottom instead of the top.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jive Turkey /forum/post/16865433


Jason, I've got mine currently stand mounted and the lense is probably less than 18" below screen center. I've propped the back end up with a door stop wedge so that the lense is as close to parrallel with the screen as possible, and then used the lense shift to bring the image up on the screen. I had tried doing it without the door wedge and using the appropriate lense shift, but getting the lense as straight up and down as possible with the wedge seemed to help.


I find myself still needing keystone +2. My VW60 has a minor uptick of the right upper corner; only really noticable with a 1.85 on a 1.78 screen, where the black bars are close to the screen frame, or on a test disc. Sony in Laredo said the projector is fine (or I guess within their tolerance).


Any suggestions that might square me up? I've spent many hours with physical positioning, and the door wedge and a slight keystone is about as close as I can get it (about 1/4"-1/2" high). Keystoning too much surely makes the problem appear at the bottom instead of the top.

It is quite simple, the projector is pointed towards the larger side of the image. If the image is bigger on the bottom than on the top, the projector is pointed down too much. If the right side is larger than the left, the projector is pointed to the right. If the top or one side lines up with the edge of the screen and the other is off, then the projector is low on one side or the other.


The only need for keystone is when a projector must be mounted outside of a proper mounting position.
 

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Do you feel best that I let the back end of the projector down off the wedge (I'd say the back end is 1-1/2" up to allow the lense rim on the case to be parrallel with the screen), and just use what lense shift is required?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jive Turkey /forum/post/16868953


Do you feel best that I let the back end of the projector down off the wedge (I'd say the back end is 1-1/2" up to allow the lense rim on the case to be parrallel with the screen), and just use what lense shift is required?

Admittedly I am having a tough time visualizing. But, basically your projector should be perfectly perpendicular to the screen (both directions)...so assuming you have a flat ceiling and flat floor, it should be parallel to those. From there use lens shift to adjust and if you still cannot get it on the screen, you need to adjust the position of the projector (not tilt though) or screen accordingly.


Again, this is for optimum positioning.
 
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