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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was reading in a magazine where it said you should do studs than subfloor because the floor will need room to contract and expand. If you put the floor first the studs may shift and buckle if the floor changes shape. I am trying metal studs for the first time and it would be a breeze to drill the track to the subfloor instead of through concrete.


Im putting platton down first then OSB so im thinking that will help but i just dont know how much a floor moves in a basement. Doing the subfloor first would be much easier also for the simple fact that i wouldnt have to install osb around walls.


So which should come first, studs or floor?
 

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If there is a remote chance that your basement could experience a water event exceeding the height of the platton, your floor will need to come out. Probably the lower part of the drywall too. During this process you will be so happy that you didn't mount the wall to the sub-floor.


As for ease, get a power activated gun and just shoot the base plate in position. No need for screwing.
 

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I put platon in AFTER I build my walls. I HAVE had water issues and the floor needed to come up. I would have been worse off if I had built the walls on top of the platon. Build the walls first, use tapcon screws or a power activated hammer then put in the flooring. Once you get your flooring in I have a trick for you or actually a technique for you to use to secure the subfloor to the concrete that works very well and is pretty cheap (relatively speaking). The platon is a great product and I am very happy I put it down as my subfloor. You won't be disappointed.


Good luck.


Regards,


RTROSE
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC /forum/post/18268140


If there is a remote chance that your basement could experience a water event exceeding the height of the platton, your floor will need to come out. Probably the lower part of the drywall too. During this process you will be so happy that you didn't mount the wall to the sub-floor.


As for ease, get a power activated gun and just shoot the base plate in position. No need for screwing.

That was the first thing i have thought of is the water issue. i do get a little, i mean a little, standing water in my basement. It only happened once when we got a deluge of rain. otherwise the worst it gets is moisture. I also just finished drywalling my new bedroom in the basement and didnt use PT lumber for the bottom of walls. whopps, didnt think of that, thats why we are going metal. anyway. You make an excellent point of if i get flooded id have to rip the walls out as well as the floor. going to do walls first.


Also in relation to the powder gun. I used them to brace the walls to the floor. there was quite a few times where i would whack it and the nail wouldnt go down all the way. how do i make sure it goes down all the way?


sorry if this is a mess, ive been up for 34 hours.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
in my bedroom i used platton then OSB on top. Used concrete nails first and discovered how much of a pain the ass those are to work with. tried Tapcon screws in conjunction with a hammer drill and it was CAKE compared to the nails. whats your secret?
 

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Well I found that the tapcons were a pain and went this way. Drill a hole in the concrete with a hammer drill. Use a fluted nail with a piece of copper wire (shorter than the nail) and drive it home. Much cheaper than the tapcons more secure, and obviously not prone to stripping like the tapcons were for me.


To each his own, but I found the nail/copper wire to be a fast and more efficient method for me.


Regards,


RTROSE
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
read that you could use solder instead of copper also. i kept having tapcons snap on me,, found out i wasnt drilling deep enough. the things i dont like with the nails is that once its bent, its done and they can be a pain to back out. im prone to mistakes so i like that i can unscrew the tapcons.
 

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I just never got the feel for the tapcons and would over tighten just enough where they would strip and I would be out of luck. The nail/copper route for me was pretty much fool proof. I did find out early though I had the same problem of not drilling deep enough, but even when I figured that out I still had some issues with stripping (user error) as sometimes I just felt I could not get the tapcon tight enough and that extra 1/4 turn would cause it to strip.


Fun stuff for sure.


Regards,


RTROSE
 
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