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I was just setting up my new HSU sub over the weekend and noticed that night that the 3 of 4 closest to sub lamps in my living room window were blown out. (A strange coincidence since they all were working the night before). These lamps are relatively inexpensive to replace, but in line with one of the lamps is my Sony SXRD Rear Projection tv with a fairly expensive bulb in it.

Will heavy sub use create premature lamp burn out for the tv?


The setup is on a wood floor covered with wall to wall carpeting and the sub is only 6 feet from the tv.
 

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I've seen a pair of subs blow out the lamps in two wall sconces on their initial "test firing" while the lamps were operating. Added a nice dramatic touch :) Pretty insane levels at the time though, now that the subs are calibrated and balanced with the rest of the audio there hasn't been a repeat.


The structure of a UHP projector lamp is considerably different and more rugged than a typical incandescent bulb, I wouldn't expect problems.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by vetman54 /forum/post/0


I was just setting up my new HSU sub over the weekend and noticed that night that the 3 of 4 closest to sub lamps in my living room window were blown out. (A strange coincidence since they all were working the night before). These lamps are relatively inexpensive to replace, but in line with one of the lamps is my Sony SXRD Rear Projection tv with a fairly expensive bulb in it.

Will heavy sub use create premature lamp burn out for the tv?


The setup is on a wood floor covered with wall to wall carpeting and the sub is only 6 feet from the tv.

Did the lamps blow as the sub was playing or did the lamps just blow when you turned them on when the sub was not even on?


I ask this because two lamps in my house just blew the moment I put new HT equipment in my house. I dont know if its a correlation or not but Im very curious.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidML3 /forum/post/0


Did the lamps blow as the sub was playing or did the lamps just blow when you turned them on when the sub was not even on?


I ask this because two lamps in my house just blew the moment I put new HT equipment in my house. I dont know if its a correlation or not but Im very curious.

The lamps blew while the subs were playing, as I remember it was the scene in I Robot where the house gets wrecked by the buldozers, when the dozers hit the house the lamps popped.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sjmarcy /forum/post/0


Sure subs can blow out bulbs or greatly accelerate their demise. You can switch to rough service bulbs (reinforced) which will live just fine. Or energy efficient "bulbs" If you flick your finger against a normal bulb you can kill it. The filament is pretty weak. I've never had a problem with front projector bulb life.


interesting. I learned something new today. I guess I shouldnt use the dollar store bulbs and get better ones
 

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It is known that when a powerful electrical appliance starts, it may interfere with other appliances, though this is very much a _local_ issue. I have experienced lamps dimming, but not blowing.


Sealed (you have that?) subwoofers typically have very powerful amplifiers, and if you are using your dishwasher, tumble drier and washing machine at the same time as you are exercising your cooking skills, the lamps might not have a stable enough current.


At my home I can't use the tumble drier and washing machine at the same time without blowing a fuse on that circuit. So, sealed subwoofers was for that reason on the very bottom of my list.


You can protect your expensive equipment in a similar way that one protects computers. A good UPS will go a very long way, but may be overkill since you do not need a long "uptime"
Better ask somebody that actually knows what more appropiate options there are.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by allsop4now /forum/post/0


It is known that when a powerful electrical appliance starts, it may interfere with other appliances, though this is very much a _local_ issue. I have experienced lamps dimming, but not blowing.


Sealed (you have that?) subwoofers typically have very powerful amplifiers, and if you are using your dishwasher, tumble drier and washing machine at the same time as you are exercising your cooking skills, the lamps might not have a stable enough current.


At my home I can't use the tumble drier and washing machine at the same time without blowing a fuse on that circuit. So, sealed subwoofers was for that reason on the very bottom of my list.


You can protect your expensive equipment in a similar way that one protects computers. A good UPS will go a very long way, but may be overkill since you do not need a long "uptime"
Better ask somebody that actually knows what more appropiate options there are.

I believe it's the vibration of the light bulb's filament that causes them to blow when there is a lot of bass in the room....not any electrical issues.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rupert /forum/post/0


I believe it's the vibration of the light bulb's filament that causes them to blow when there is a lot of bass in the room....not any electrical issues.

Flipping a power switch in-off rapidly will reduce the life time of "classical" bulbs. With insufficent current on your circuit you could achieve a similar effect.


The bulb threads are of varying expected lifetime and quality, and you get what you pay for.
 
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