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Is this a common issue or is it just my 32" Samsung LED TV acting up? I mean, it's been a few months since I bought the HDTV and I don't think they will accept to replace it for me. The only thing I can do is get it checked out. Is there any fix for this problem and also is it a common one with LED TV's/HDTV's in general?
 

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That's one of the pitfalls of liquid crystal displays regardless of the backlighting source (LED in your case). It's sometimes possible to unstick a pixel, though methods vary and some run the risk of damage. I'm sure someone more experienced in that arena will chime in shortly.


Moved to display forums.
 

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Read your warranty carefully though...

Most warranties will not repair/replace for one stuck/dead pixel.


Things may have changed, but from what I remember, most stipulated that you had to have 4 or more dead pixels in the same area of the display. YMMV
 

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Do I have a stuck pixel on my 46" led/lcd? I honestly don't know. I don't see any when watching from 6-8 feet away and haven't invested in a magnifying glass to go over every square inch of the screen looking for trouble.
 

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This just happened with a UN55D6050 I purchased at BJs during the week. It had one dead pixel. I exchanged it right away.


I think its unacceptable. I paid for 2073600 pixels, not 2073599.


I took it right back to BJs, said it had one dead pixel, and exchanged it no problem for a set that was perfect.


Why live with it? I have never come across a store that wouldn't let you exchange a tv for dead pixels.



It bothers me when people say a dead pixel is normal, or to be expected. Its not "Normal" Pixels aren't supposed to be "dead". The consumer is not supposed to accept a few dead pixels. Some companies that make the panels allow one or two dead pixels past quality control for cost purposes. That could be a "normal" practice for a company but you as a consumer have every single right to get what you paid for. If a set claims "1080p" and you have a dead pixel, you technically don't have a 1920x1080 set.
It's a defect. Don't allow a company to tell you that because there business practice accepts the defect as normal, that you and your hard earned money has to as well!



Any store would be happy to exchange it. Thats why I would rather take it back to the store then deal with the manufacturer. Maybe if enough sets get returned, companies will re-think there quality control.
 

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It's a "fixed pixel" technology. No one said it's acceptable, but it happens and in some cases has to be livable if there are no other alternatives.


If you buy at a B&M store and have a problem on "day one", return it. OTOH, if you purchase from an E-tailer, it may not be cost effective and/or very time consuming (that's if they honor exchanges).


Now, if the "return window" has expired from either a retailer or e-tailer, the next and only step is to use warranty service from the manufacturer. And... they may not replace/repair your set with only one dead pixel.


I'm glad your experience was easily/quickly resolved.
 

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I wasn't saying dead pixels were acceptable. I was trying to say I didn't go out of my way to find a defect that I could not see in normal viewing. I've never hesitated to return a set that had a problem I could see in normal use--I suspect I'm one of the reasons Circuit City is out of business. What I've never done is return a set because it didn't perfectly display some test pattern on a calibration disc but was completely satisfactory for normal use.


Although most mfg warranties won't fix one dead pixel most retailers will take back a set with one during the normal return period. A set with one dead pixel will be put on sale open box in the hopes that the next buyer doesn't spot it.


The economics of mass production being what they are, and the complexity of panel production being what it is, I would think that if every set were subjected to a magnifying-glass inspection for dead pixels at the factory, and rejected for just one, the price of tvs would be a lot higher than it is.


Absolute perfection may not be impossible but it is impossible at a price people are willing to pay.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by HD'er /forum/post/20785741


Is this a common issue or is it just my 32" Samsung LED TV acting up? I mean, it's been a few months since I bought the HDTV and I don't think they will accept to replace it for me. The only thing I can do is get it checked out. Is there any fix for this problem and also is it a common one with LED TV's/HDTV's in general?

http://www.imagingassociates.com.au/...ullscreen.jspx


Boky
 

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My post wasn't addressed to anyone specifically besides the OP.


Just saying, you have rights as a consumer. Ive never lived with a defective product in my life, because I don't let it happen, whether its an online purchase or retail.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by redwolf4k /forum/post/20793383


My post wasn't addressed to anyone specifically besides the OP.


Just saying, you have rights as a consumer. Ive never lived with a defective product in my life, because I don't let it happen, whether its an online purchase or retail.

I get what you're trying to say, and I completely agree with it, but the problem is that the warranty, even if it's still active, won't allow for a TV replacement. That should have been done a month at max from the purchase date, not something like 7-8 months later.


What I'm looking for is a quick fix or a solution for the problem that doesn't require a replacement which is out of the question now.
 
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