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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have my system set up In the garage. Subwoofer is bottom firing. At some point the garage will be climate controlled, but not at this point. Should I be worried about low moisture issue with the materials on the speakers? If yes, what is to be done. I am sure it wont me a quick issue, but I dont want the speakers to get dry and fall apart.

Btw I fully understand I am overthinking this.
 

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I have my system set up In the garage. Subwoofer is bottom firing. At some point the garage will be climate controlled, but not at this point. Should I be worried about low moisture issue with the materials on the speakers? If yes, what is to be done. I am sure it wont me a quick issue, but I dont want the speakers to get dry and fall apart.

Btw I fully understand I am overthinking this.
The biggest problem, is the rubber periphery of the newer speakers the sun it will harden the rubber and too much sun exposure can also bleach wood veneers over a period of time also. Direct sunlight will "cook" foam and the plastic resins in the fiberglass cones causing them to become embrittle which ultimately leads to failure.

I have my system in a room facing south west so after 12:00pm the sun cooks the room and get direct UV rays even so it is filtered throught the double pane tinted windows.

I use to have a sofa by that window before and the leather became dry and cracked! I since then installed floor to ceiling drapes with blackout, and I close the curtains every day in the afternoon! The curtains have been bleached by the sun but at least my B&W 800 Diamonds are safe. I also live in dry climate so I use a humidifier when the degree of humidity is too low.

"The effect of humidity on the speed of sound is slightly greater at lower air pressures, like those you experience at high altitude. At about 6,000 meters (20,000 feet) above sea level, for example, the difference between the speed of sound in room temperature dry air at 0 percent humidity and the same air at 100 percent humidity is about 0.7 percent. Increasing temperature also magnifies the effect of humidity on the speed of sound in air, although again the increase is relatively modest." http://quest.arc.nasa.gov/aero/events/regimes/speed.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The biggest problem, is the rubber periphery of the newer speakers the sun it will harden the rubber and too much sun exposure can also bleach wood veneers over a period of time also. Direct sunlight will "cook" foam and the plastic resins in the fiberglass cones causing them to become embrittle which ultimately leads to failure.

I have my system in a room facing south west so after 12:00pm the sun cooks the room and get direct UV rays even so it is filtered throught the double pane tinted windows.

I use to have a sofa by that window before and the leather became dry and cracked! I since then installed floor to ceiling drapes with blackout, and I close the curtains every day in the afternoon! The curtains have been bleached by the sun but at least my B&W 800 Diamonds are safe. I also live in dry climate so I use a humidifier when the degree of humidity is too low.

"The effect of humidity on the speed of sound is slightly greater at lower air pressures, like those you experience at high altitude. At about 6,000 meters (20,000 feet) above sea level, for example, the difference between the speed of sound in room temperature dry air at 0 percent humidity and the same air at 100 percent humidity is about 0.7 percent. Increasing temperature also magnifies the effect of humidity on the speed of sound in air, althoug again the increase is relatively modest." http://quest.arc.nasa.gov/aero/events/regimes/speed.html
Wow, I hadn't even thought about the speed of sound. Iwas just thinking the rubber or foam would get cracked or fade.

No sun light for me, but it still doesn answer the question. I am sure you use the humidifier for reasons other then speaker maintenance.
 

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My problem would be too much humidity, and heat, and critters, in an unfinished garage.

Electrostatics bleed their charge with increasing humidity, and lose efficiency, more toward the higher frequencies.

The AC runs 6-7 months here, and keeps the humidity in the house at about 50%, but during the winter, if there is a high humidity event, I sometimes start noticing a little correctable dulling of the sound.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
My problem would be too much humidity, and heat, and critters, in an unfinished garage.

Electrostatics bleed their charge with increasing humidity, and lose efficiency, more toward the higher frequencies.

The AC runs 6-7 months here, and keeps the humidity in the house at about 50%, but during the winter, if there is a high humidity event, I sometimes start noticing a little correctable dulling of the sound.
3/4 of the walls are insulated with vapor barrier. I have half the insulation to insulate the ceiling and that will be done in a few days. I will also insulate the door and include a vapor barrier. I have already secured the entire perimeter of the garage with new weather stripping. I have spent a lot of time in the garage either working or watching, I also hang my camping gear to dry in there when outside is not an option. The gear dries very quickly. I had leak in my water heater, before i started making it a living space, and every time it leaked the leak dried very quickly. I have not felt the humidity unless the door was up. It usually feels dry. Hence my concern. I am not sure the exact levels. I also will be adding vents into the garage and a return when I have to replace my HVAC. Maybe when I finish the insulation it will trap more of the humidity.
 

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My problem would be too much humidity, and heat, and critters, in an unfinished garage.
+1, and nothing loves high humidity more than mold. Large daytime to night time temperature swings make matters worse, so insulating to minimize temperature swing is key to protecting your gear.
 

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I'd definitely like to keep my speakers and other gear safe from exposure to large temperature swings, humidity or direct sunlight (or through windows). But good luck trying to convince the siginificant other that the shades and curtains must be closed during the day all summer! Besides that, I like sunlight too. And, unfortunately, the living room is the only room (besides the bed room) big enough to make my system work well, acoustically.

Am concider myself an audio-nut. But I will not allow my hifi gear to affect such a large portion of the rest of my life, such as living behind curtains to protect my speakers. I'd rather keep the grilles on, even though that does negatively affect the sound. Without AC I can't keep the temperature in the house in the low 20's during the warm season, so my amp gets pretty warm during these months. That is a potential danger and does affect it's life span negatively. But, I just assume, a well designed amp should be able to withstand a bit of heat. Especially since it has cooling fans built in.
 
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