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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'll be buying a 42" Panasonic plasma TV (soon!), and I'm considering the Denon DVD 1600. I'm fairly sure that this player (like the Panasonic RP56) is unable to scale.


Therefore, I'm worried that the Panny plasma might lock into widescreen mode when fed a 480p signal, which would be bad when watching non-anamorphic DVD's.


Do any 42" Panny owners use either of these DVD players? If so, any problems?


Thanks in advance for your input,


TMG
 

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Don't know about the Denon, but I use a RP56. In progressive mode you have 'full' or 'zoom'. In progressive mode 2.35:1 still does not fill the screen (vertically). But in interlace mode you have all the AR functions. The 'just' mode works great to fill the screen, even in interlaced mode.


Bruce


PS. I thought the RP56 was being replaced with RP60-61, better check those details out.
 

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Brucer,


Thanks for the quick response, but I'm not sure that you answered the question.


2.35:1 will never fill the screen, regardless of aspect ratio control. I think the question was whether the display has an option to *not* anamorphically compress 480P signals if the image is non-anamorphic.


Kit
 

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I have the Panny RP-91 DVD player and now that I have the Panny plasma

I really appreciate the scaling features the RP-91. I have quite a few DVDs that have been helped, or outright saved by the RP-91 scaling.

(for instance, on my non-anamorphic wide screen DVD of Young Frankenstein, in 480p I'd have to watch it either distorted, or zoomed with obvious loss of resolution. The RP-91 scales the 16:9 picture beautifully to fill my screen, with no distortion.


I believe the reduced aspect ratio functions in 480p are not unique to the Panny screen. As I understand it, this is fairly typical for 16:9 screens when fed a progressive signal. (True? False?).


Rich.
 

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Rich,


I take it from your response that the display does indeed lock into full when fed 480P. Thanks for clarifying this. In the end, it's not a big deal.


Thanks.


Kit
 

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No, it does not lock into full when feed a 480p- You are allowed two choices, either ZOOM or FULL.


Dave
 

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I am not sure I can fully answer your question, but I do have a Panny 42" and a Denon 1600 (my choice due to its video processor). :) I have them connected using component cables.


First of all, no, it does not lock. My Panny was manufactured in April 2002 and I don't think I've tried a S-Video connection, so I am not sure if the "lock" problem still exists on mine. The thing about 1600 is that it's louder than the Panny. :) At first, I thought the buzzing noise was coming from the Panny, but it turns out it's coming from the 1600.


Although the signal doesn't "lock," the Denon 1600 does not have a "zoom" feature. You can select "4:3 pan&scan", "4:3 letterbox" or "16:9 wide screen" for the display on the 1600 (I have it set to "16:9 wide screen"), and that's it.


Panny's zoom modes are "Normal", "Zoom", "Full" and "Just". The mode didn't quite work as I imagined initially. "Normal" will always show the picture as 4:3, regardless of the 1600's setting, with black/gray sidebars. "Zoom" will fill up the sidebars, but will cut off top and bottom, of what was showing in "Normal". "Full" will "stretch horizontally" of what was showing in "Normal". "Just" will do this wide-angle lens-ish effect to fill up the display from what was showing in "Normal".


As you can see, the "Normal" (4:3 or what Panny seems to assume for the input signal) is the base for all other modes.


My only gripe is since "Zoom" was based on "Normal" always, I couldn't zoom into 2.35:1 materials to fill up the screen. The best I could do was "Full" in this case with black/gray horizontal bars. For some reason (maybe that's the definition but...), the Panny seems to assume that the input signal is always 4:3. If there is an option to change this, I haven't found it.


Other than that, the combo seems to work fine. I was actually used to my old Toshiba interlaced DVD player's display (bit rates and remaining time) and control (had 3-level zooms), but I am getting used to it. :) I haven't really compared it with other competitive progressive players, but the picture looks great (although I don't have everyone's favorite demo material, "Fifth Element").


Hong.


EDIT: Come to think of it... the problem I described above might be due to the encoded material itself... I've been watching some old ones these days... As Dave mentions, sometimes the options were less (two?), but sometimes (that is, some other DVDs), all four were available.
 
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