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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I do not ave an AVR or SSP yet that supports HDMI, I expect that will change over the comming weeks.

Since I have little experiance in this area, I am not certain if this may or may not be an odd question to ask.


I know, or I think I do, that if you only have a two channel system, what one would normally do with DD+ is, in the player, set it to output this format in stereo, rather then multi-channel and still recieve all the information.


Now here is the part that I'm lost about.


If you actually do have a multi-channel system, but you still want DD+ to play in two channel stereo, is there a "mode" built into any of the AVR's or SSP's that will do this processing/decoding, even if it is still being sent a multi-channel signal from the player.

The reason being of course, that I "feel" better having my AVR/SSP do the decoding, rather then having it done in the player, if it were possible.

So, what I am looking for is an SSP/AVR that has an actual button for a mode I'll call, Dolby Digital+ Stereo


I'd appreciate any insight regarding this mode and this mode only. If it actually does exist in any or even all modern AVR/SSP's, I'd like to know.

Again, Thanks
 

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All receivers should support a downmix to two channels if you are running only two speakers. This is part of the DD standard.


Your post got a little confusing, so that's the best answer I can give. I would like to mention that it generally would not matter whether source or receiver is doing decoding if all connections are digital. I don't have the energy to argue this for the 100th or more time. But all my instincts and knowledge tell me I am right here, with a few exceptions not worth mentioning.


If all connections are NOT digital, for example using a CD players DACs and connecting it via analog to a receiver, you open up the possibility of DACs and other circuitry could affect the sound. IMO, it's silly to go out of your way to bypass a receiver's DACs for a stereo source, because it will simply convert the analog to digital and then use it's own DACs anyway. You would have to use multi-channel inputs, which almost always bypass the receiver's DSP/DACs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I am simply looking for Multi-chanel Dolby+ out of the player over HDMI and want to do the conversation to 2channel Dolby+ stereo in the SSP. Don't strain your brain trying to explain why it need not be that way, only need to know if a mode called Dolby+ stereo mode exists in an SSP


Thanks
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbrother52
I am simply looking for Multi-chanel Dolby+ out of the player over HDMI and want to do the conversation to 2channel Dolby+ stereo in the SSP. Don't strain your brain trying to explain why it need not be that way, only need to know if a mode called Dolby+ stereo mode exists in an SSP
DD+ is a specific codec that is almost never used. It was common on HD-DVD, but I don't think it's on any BDs. So, are you asking about DD+ or is this a more general question about whether a processor can do decoding and downmix the output to stereo?


The answer to the general question is yes, they can all do that. If you configure the SSP for only two speakers, it will happen automatically. If you configure it for more than two, most have a button or setting to force a stereo downmix from whatever source you are playing.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbrother52
I am simply looking for Multi-chanel Dolby+ out of the player over HDMI and want to do the conversation to 2channel Dolby+ stereo in the SSP. Don't strain your brain trying to explain why it need not be that way, only need to know if a mode called Dolby+ stereo mode exists in an SSP


Thanks
I will be certain not to "strain my brain" attempting to read your posts in the future
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIslander
If you configure it for more than two, most have a button or setting to force a stereo downmix from whatever source you are playing.


That's the answer I needed.... Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
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Originally Posted by MichaelJHuman
I will be certain not to "strain my brain" attempting to read your posts in the future
Haa

Don't go that far, only for this dumb question, if you don't mind
 

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Originally Posted by jdsmoothie
DD+ is the codec that Netflix is now using on some movies and eventually will expand to more over the next year.
Interesting. I see it was rolled out for the PS3 in October. DD+ is also the hi-res codec approved for HDTV transmission, although I've not seen any plan to implement that enhancement.
 

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On my receiver, there are three options under the STEREO button on the remote.


"When you select STEREO, you will hear the source through just the front left and right speakers (and possibly your subwoofer depending on your speaker settings). Dolby Digital, DTS and WMA9 Pro multi-channel sources are downmixed to stereo."


STEREO: The audio is heard with your surround settings [room correction and EQ] and you can still use the Midnight, Loudness and Tone functions


F.S. SURR FOCUS:Use to provide a rich surround sound effect directed to the center of where the front left and right speakers sound projection area converges


F.S. SURR WIDE: Use to provide a surround sound effect to a wider area that FOCUS mode


It appears to work on DTS and 96kHz LPCM signals (I am using a Dire Straits BluRay with DTS-HD, but I have a fat PS3 so can't test the HD formats directly). The manual says that you can't use the STEREO button for multi-channel analog signals.


See http://www.pioneerelectronics.ca/Sta...ctions0512.pdf Page 58-59


Also, under the advanced surround modes, there is an EXT. STEREO which outputs stereo across all speakers (including surrounds), effectively moving the sound stage to the middle of the room.
 
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