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The blinking "lock" light is telling you that the incoming signal is defective.

This could be a problem in the source (either disc or player), the cable or the receiver.

I'll assume you've tried different Dolby-encoded discs.

The first thing to do is to make sure all of the cables are fully seated. Press on both ends of each. HDMI cables are only friction-fit and can look like they're in all the way but are not.

If that doesn't help, replace the cabling. Make sure you get a new HDMI cable which is Certified High Speed. Standard Speed cables are inadequate for 1080p video. Don't waste your money on "boutique" cables. Popular sources here are Monoprice and Blue Jeans Cable.

Then replace the player. Get a current Sony or Panasonic Blu-ray player. (Sony has more streaming options; Panasonic has more video adjustment options.) Unfortunately, most other brands tend to be unreliable, with buggy firmware and flaky hardware.

Then investigate getting the receiver repaired or replaced.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The blinking "lock" light is telling you that the incoming signal is defective.

This could be a problem in the source (either disc or player), the cable or the receiver.

I'll assume you've tried different Dolby-encoded discs.

The first thing to do is to make sure all of the cables are fully seated. Press on both ends of each. HDMI cables are only friction-fit and can look like they're in all the way but are not.

If that doesn't help, replace the cabling. Make sure you get a new HDMI cable which is Certified High Speed. Standard Speed cables are inadequate for 1080p video. Don't waste your money on "boutique" cables. Popular sources here are Monoprice and Blue Jeans Cable.

Then replace the player. Get a current Sony or Panasonic Blu-ray player. (Sony has more streaming options; Panasonic has more video adjustment options.) Unfortunately, most other brands tend to be unreliable, with buggy firmware and flaky hardware.

Then investigate getting the receiver repaired or replaced.
I figured as much. I had just recently moved the projector farther back in the room after installing the larger screen. I had to couple and extend the original HDMI cable from the projector to the receiver. The intermittent sound isn't consistent. Sometimes it will happen heavily like in the video and sometimes it will rarely happen. I can't seem to notice a difference with different disks.

Is it possible for an HDMI cable with tight kinks/bends to do something to the signal? After coupling the HDMI cable I stuffed it back into the ceiling which may be the source of the issue.

Thanks
 

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I figured as much. I had just recently moved the projector farther back in the room after installing the larger screen. I had to couple and extend the original HDMI cable from the projector to the receiver. The intermittent sound isn't consistent. Sometimes it will happen heavily like in the video and sometimes it will rarely happen. I can't seem to notice a difference with different disks.

Is it possible for an HDMI cable with tight kinks/bends to do something to the signal? After coupling the HDMI cable I stuffed it back into the ceiling which may be the source of the issue.

Thanks
HDMI cables are nasty. If a cable is rated for x speed for y length, extending it with another piece is not recommended. Now may will argu, that it works. Yes it does. But often times it gives problems that does not easily point to the cable. Your problem may be with HDMI or may be not. But that being the last change, you should start there..
 

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Yes, do not kink your cables - kinked cables change the impedance of the high speed lines inside and cause reflections which degrade signal quality. Couplers do that as well since every connection is an impedance mismatch.

Go to monoprice or your favorite cable place and buy a high quality high speed HDMI cable of the right length. Don't go for the skinny flexible ones either. Plug both ends into you equipment first without running it through your ceilings or whatever just to make sure it's all working properly. Then run your line loosely without bending it more than what the cable will give you.

HDMI signals are amongst the fastest and longest signals consumers have access to - we can easily see 3Gbps run on the max 15m cable length (approx 50 feet).
 
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