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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I installed in-wall speakers last night, and one tip I got on here was to double the drywall where the speakers mount... and I will be building a box around them. Basically I plan to put the second layer of drywall behind the first that is already up and painted, and I have open access to the back of the wall (the studs are exposed). So the drywall will be around 14.5" wide (the area between the studs) and maybe 2' tall. Could I just use liquid nails or some sort of adhesive to secure the small back piece of drywall to the front piece?


Thanks!
 

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I also would like to know this question. I would like to know how well GG adheres to paint. I have a finished room already, and it would be much easier if I could keep the current drywall intact and just redrywall another layer.


Thanks in advance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by gimmepilotwings /forum/post/16920559


I also would like to know this question. I would like to know how well GG adheres to paint. I have a finished room already, and it would be much easier if I could keep the current drywall intact and just redrywall another layer.


Thanks in advance.

Well hopefully someone will step in and answer our questions! I don't think I'll use green glue because I literally am only placing about 6 square foot of drywall and I can't find anywhere to buy less than a whole case.
 

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gimme - GG is not actually glue. Think of it as a sticky peanut butter. Paint doesn't effect it's installation or performance. You still need to screw the second layer of drywall to the studs.


doomi - liquid nails would be fine for your purpose.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cathan /forum/post/16920879


gimme - GG is not actually glue. Think of it as a sticky peanut butter. Paint doesn't effect it's installation or performance. You still need to screw the second layer of drywall to the studs.


doomi - liquid nails would be fine for your purpose.

Thanks for the reply. A layer of GG plus drywall screws, light mudding/sanding, and then fabric going up.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by gimmepilotwings /forum/post/16920933


Thanks for the reply. A layer of GG plus drywall screws, light mudding/sanding, and then fabric going up.

Yep.. though the sanding is optional if you are going to cover it with fabric. Also, be sure to stagger the seems so that they don't line up.


CJ
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by dooomi /forum/post/16920356


I installed in-wall speakers last night, and one tip I got on here was to double the drywall where the speakers mount... and I will be building a box around them.

What function is the second layer of drywall going to serve? All it will do is make the drywall in that area a bit more rigid and have slightly more mass.


What is the function of the back box? If it is to help with the sound isolation, it will help somewhat, but not too much with the bass, which is the sound that tends to carry.


If it is to help with the sound of the inwall speaker, you will likely need to do some more research before building your back box. What brand and model is your speaker? Does it have an open back or is it already enclosed?


If it is already enclosed, adding a back box will do nothing to improve the sound. If it is not enclosed, it was likely designed to work in an infinite baffle (basically the open stud bay behind the drywall) and enclosing it may or may not help with the sound. For ones that work well with back boxes, the manufacturer will likely have a recommended volume for the best sound.


CJ
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cathan /forum/post/16920879


gimme - GG is not actually glue. Think of it as a sticky peanut butter. Paint doesn't effect it's installation or performance. You still need to screw the second layer of drywall to the studs.


doomi - liquid nails would be fine for your purpose.

Thanks for your reply!

Quote:
Originally Posted by CJO /forum/post/16921222


What function is the second layer of drywall going to serve? All it will do is make the drywall in that area a bit more rigid and have slightly more mass.


What is the function of the back box? If it is to help with the sound isolation, it will help somewhat, but not too much with the bass, which is the sound that tends to carry.


If it is to help with the sound of the inwall speaker, you will likely need to do some more research before building your back box. What brand and model is your speaker? Does it have an open back or is it already enclosed?


If it is already enclosed, adding a back box will do nothing to improve the sound. If it is not enclosed, it was likely designed to work in an infinite baffle (basically the open stud bay behind the drywall) and enclosing it may or may not help with the sound. For ones that work well with back boxes, the manufacturer will likely have a recommended volume for the best sound.


CJ

In one of my other threads (listed below) a response was that I should double up the drywall to add mass and rigidity.


I have three Paradigm CS-160 speakers (open back) that I have for my fronts and center, which I ended up puting in the wall last night. I think part of my sound problem comes from the fact that the back of the wall they are mounted on is in my sub-basement. So the back side of the wall is just open, with no drywall basically creating a huge a concrete box.


I already have threads out that kind of answer your questions... if you wouldn't mind taking a look. Any help is greatly appreciated!!!


Thanks again!

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1166967
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1166708
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by dooomi /forum/post/16921333


Thanks for your reply!




In one of my other threads (listed below) a response was that I should double up the drywall to add mass and rigidity.


I have three Paradigm CS-160 speakers (open back) that I have for my fronts and center, which I ended up puting in the wall last night. I think part of my sound problem comes from the fact that the back of the wall they are mounted on is in my sub-basement. So the back side of the wall is just open, with no drywall basically creating a huge a concrete box.


I already have threads out that kind of answer your questions... if you wouldn't mind taking a look. Any help is greatly appreciated!!!


Thanks again!

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1166967
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1166708

Based on the posts, a .42 CF or larger box looks like the ticket. I'd like to hear more from BIG on his recommendation to double up on the drywall around the speaker. It's the first I've really heard of it. It won't hurt to do it, but I doubt that it will help the sound either.


CJ
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by CJO /forum/post/16921616


Based on the posts, a .42 CF or larger box looks like the ticket. I'd like to hear more from BIG on his recommendation to double up on the drywall around the speaker. It's the first I've really heard of it. It won't hurt to do it, but I doubt that it will help the sound either.


CJ

Yeah, the .42 or larger looks like the way to go. Now I just have to design it. Some material I have read suggests just building the box using the existing framing by running horizontal 2x4's across the top and bottom of the speaker and using MDF/Plywood for the back. Other material I've read says you actually want a seperate box not using any of the exising framing, basically build a full MDF box and put it behind the speaker... not touching the studs. I think I'm going to experiment with the first option (using the existing studs) and not do the double drywall for now. Since the wall is open backed I can keep testing different scenarios until it has the sound I want.


On the Paradigm website they recommend puting a few strips of standard insulation behind the speakers (when installed normally in-wall/ceiling that is backed by more drywall)... should I put that in my box, or I have a ton of sound deadening foam from a recording studio. Would the foam possibly make it too dead?


Thanks again for all the help! This is my first home purchase and I just want to do this right.
 

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The pieces that you read about not using any of the existing framing is likely to help with sound isolation. Since this doesn't sound like it's a concern of yours, I don't think that there isn't any reason not to do it as simply as possible. My opinion would be that you should add the foam in the box or just stuff it with insulation, which will help keep down reverberations.


CJ
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by CJO /forum/post/16921723


The pieces that you read about not using any of the existing framing is likely to help with sound isolation. Since this doesn't sound like it's a concern of yours, I don't think that there isn't any reason not to do it as simply as possible. My opinion would be that you should add the foam in the box or just stuff it with insulation, which will help keep down reverberations.


CJ

That's pretty much what I figured with the sound isolation. It's not a huge concern at this point, so I'm just going to simple route and make the theater room sound as good as possible for now.


Thanks!
 

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It was my suggestion since the back of the wall was open to add another layer of drywall to the back prior to closing in the stud bay and creating a back box. In my opinion a single 1/2 layer of drywall is prone to vibrating. Adding another layer of 5/8 glued to the first will add mass to resist the vibration. Then seal up the stud bay, add putty pads to any outlets, stuff the bay with insulation and then screw on a layer of 5/8 to the back of the stud bay. In essence you are building a speaker box out of the stud bay.


As I understood the application, the back of this wall was facing a utility space and there were no plans for it to be finished off. My proposal was to at least finish off the 3 bays so that the in-walls would function as they were originally designed.
 
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