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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can anyone answer this?


You take all the time to double drywall the room and ceiling then you need to cut holes for wiring, how do you control the noise escaping the room through the hole you created to route electrical and conduit into the room?


Thanks Steve
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank You,


I have posted this three different ways and had several look at it but no one would reply.


So do I have this right?


Route all wires, conduit, etc through the joists to preferably one designated entry point or section.


Then


Put up the Ceiling with the clips and double drywall and green glue;


Then put up double drywall and green glue on walls creating a vrtually air tight box.


Then cut the necessary holes to route the wiring, conduit etc. through the soffits and down into half columns to prevent cutting unneccessary holes in the wall.


Then seal with sound isolating calk to contain the noise as much as possible in the room.
 

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The extreme way is to actually build isolation boxes for all of your fixture boxes. Another route is to ensure your outlets only exist in added columns or soffits (that way, you are just poking a small hole for the wire in your walls). The third route is to do what you are suggesting, but if you go that route many here suggest you either use fire stop putty pads to wrap the outlet boxes or back butter the boxes with acoustical caulk. There may be other ways, but those are the ones I've come across. In any case, yes, you do want to caulk any gaps as you do each layer of drywall. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Mark,


My plan was to only have outlets in columns or soffits, I recently came across the thread on Sandman's build where he created a room within a room.


It appears he dry walled the entire room then had the AC guy come in to run ducting within the soffits he built.


Then it looks like he has all wiring running through Flexible non-metallic conduits right next to the ac ducting, then routed to the columns, rack system, and star ceiling.


Other than the holes made for the conduit and ducting the drywall remained untouched. and the gang boxes were hidden behind the soffits and in the stage and riser.


It is a very clean look and I just wanted to ensure I was on the right track. His build is very detailed and I feel pretty comfortable about taking on this challenge, but I will be asking a lot of questions along the way.


I'll take some pictures and begin a new thread this month as the build is on!!


I really appreciate the support,


Thanks

Steve.
 

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I'm just about at that stage as well, having just finished all the electrical wiring. Instead of running things through columsn, I put them on the framing, but I'm going to build a small MDF box around each outlet. a 4'x8' sheet of MDF costs about $30, so assuming you have average woodworking skills, you should be able to make all the boxes you need from a single sheet. Time consuming, but a bit cheaper than the putty.


Then, the only thing you seal with the silentseal is the intersection of the electrical box to the drywall.


If you plan on running things through soffits, are you building the soffits *after* the drywall, or before? If you build before, consider that the back of the soffit is open, or at least needs DD as well to create a full box.


I neglected that concept when I create my duct work runs, so now I'm busy building a dead vent out of MDF... oh joy...
 

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I'm building soffits AFTER the RSIC/DD/GG...just finished all the walls and ceilings today! I intend to do just a single layer of thinner drywall for the soffit, as it's intended use is for recessed can lights. The romex to power those cans exits the current DD through a hole just big enough for it, and of course that is caulked. I'm using metal studs for the soffit build since they are lighter, and I ran an extra set of RSIC clips and hat channel at the height of where I'll anchor the bottom metal stud to the side wall. I expect this will provide solid fixation, but it will still be decoupled. I'll document all of this with pics in my build thread over the weekend.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
My original plan was to build them after as Mark stated and use for canned lights, I am only going by what I have seen in the post in Sandman's theater, looked to go pretty smoothly so I thought I'd try that.


But now that you've mentioned it.....
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sdiaz911 /forum/post/15434580


Can anyone answer this?


Hi, I am just enjoying my HT room now. I did double drywall, green glue on all my walls and ceiling, as well as some decoupled framing. I have the standard number of outlets as per code, 4 pairs of sconces with oct. boxes, and a bank of 4 switches.


I'm pretty happy about the soundproofing. The wiring/ boxes for the electrical didn't have a major impact for me in the soundproofing equation, compared to the door needed to enter/exit the HT room.


I will put a 2nd door in the main entrance to do the 'communicating door', but am waiting until spring when it warms up to get that done, and the finishing touches.


P
 

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Hey Pete. Thanks for that update. It's always great to hear from folks after they're done and driving the new machine.


Independent lab data will show that small holes that are sealed and in proximity to insulation will not pose a big risk. So single gang outlets and light swiches are not the issue.


Ceiling cans, vents and the door ARE the nemesis. They are big openings, will allow low frequencies through and need to be dealt with using separate isolation like backer boxes, deployment in soffits not ceiling, etc.
 

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How high off the slab floor is the duct's exit point from the theater? In other words, does the return duct exit low on the wall or high up on the wall?


If low, can you get a Dead Vent built in the neighboring room? On the wall. If so, the sound would be attenuated considerably and you could safely run the (flex) duct in the mechanical room joists. http://www.soundproofingcompany.com/.../the_dead_vent


You can somewhat exchange Dead Vent width for height. So a narrower solution if we can make it 8' long. We'd rather have the width, however.
 
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