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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a path from attic to basement along an interior wall.


Since I'm running lots of cables, what's the largest hole I can drill into the stud on the floor/ceilings of the second and first floor to run cables? I'm told the stud is 16" in width if that sounds right.


I'll be running perhaps 30 cables up from the basement to the attic (cat5e and RG6) plus later perhaps some speaker or other wire, so I want the largest opening that I can get to allow these and future cabling to be run.


My painter/contractor/generally handy guy wants to run the wires through the air returns, but I'd generally prefer the straight shot up and down. He says I can only drill a 1" hole in the studs (top and bottom) which won't support the number of cables I want to run.


I'm getting pressed to get this done so that we can get our house in final shape (my wife and I are sharing an office and certain rooms have neither phone nor cable lines which we want), so any learned opinions are appreciated.


Andy
 

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The wall cavity will be a minimum of 16" wide. If the walls are 2x4, the actual width of the stud is, I believe, 1-3/4". So, base your widest hole on that measurement. You will need to have multiple conduits to support 30 wires, especially RG6, with that size hole.


edit: woops...my bad on the stud width. Correct width posted below.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
OK, if multiple holes are needed, what width can I cut, and how many can I drill out within the same between the studs gap?


i.e. within the 16" gap, can I drill multiple holes? Is each hole only 1" in diameter?


I don't have that many places that run 'clean' from basement to attic.


Thanks


Andy
 

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Studs run vertically. You're allowed to bore holes 40% of the width in load bearing walls, 60% in non load-bearing and doubled studs. You must use nail plates for electrical holes less than 1.5" to an edge. A 2x4 is 3.5" wide, 2x6 5.5" - you do the math.


The horizontal pieces conecting studs are top and toe plates. I couldn't find any restrictions on bore size in the top and toe plates; although fire blocking (2x lumber) is required arround plumbing, HVAC, etc. at the ceiling and floor line. I didn't worry about running 2" conduit through mine (if it's good enough for a 3x10" duct).
 

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Also, check with your local building inspection department. Some may have different criteria.


CJ
 
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