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Hello,


I searched 'drop ceiling' with no good results. I am planning my basement HT, and I am about 95% sure that I am using a drop ceiling.


I have read tons of stuff about drywall ceilings and insulation, but what are the recommendations for a drop ceiling? I plan to insulate between the floor joist above, but should I also have a considerable air gap (or should I use a product like ceilingmax that allows you to put the ceiling very close to the joists)?


I have already found a place that sells black Armstrong ceiling tiles. What else do I need to know about doing this, or should I avoid a drop ceiling at all costs?


REDBULL
 

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If you don't have a real need for a drop ceiling (e.g.: must have access to pipes, wires, etc that can't be easily moved), I would avoid one. A drywall ceiling looks much nicer (in my opinion), and has better sound isolation characteristics than a drop ceiling has.


Good Luck,


Dwight
 

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I've almost finished my drop ceiling and it's going very, very well. I had never done anything like this before and was a little hesitant. I researched on the Internet and read books (HD) on the topic. You'll even find instructions with the ceiling tiles. I purchased a drop ceiling starter kit ($20?) which contains several very handy tools and instructions. I had no idea they sold these and was really pleased I found it (at HD obviously near the ceiling tiles).


You'll find quite a range in pricing (and quality) of the tiles - go for tiles with the highest CAC and NR numbers (I'm not an expert but you'll find great info on this site about what those numbers mean; the first number is the ability to stop transmission of sound, the other is the ability to block - or is it the other way around?). Either way, my advice is to pay a little extra for the best ceiling tiles you can find. I used 2' x 2' acoustical tiles and they look fantastic (and yes, I think they look much better than a boring drywall ceiling).


If you're 95% sure, then get off the fence already!


In terms of other advice - PLAN, PLAN, PLAN. I spent a couple of hours planning the layout of the room. Take accurate measurements of the room and draw a scale diagram. Funny as it may sound, I used MS Word and used the grid feature (1" = 1'). I created the diagram and moved it over the grid to confirm the placement of every tile. Every aspect of the ceiling was already determined before I even picked up a piece - it really makes a huge difference. You'll also have to plan where the lighting goes. I'd also recommend you buy and use a laser tool to mark the outline of the room. I got one for Christmas that has spikes on the bottom so it can be attached to the wall. This took a while but it was incredibly accurate - DON'T rely on a regular 2' level. Once this is done, attach the 12' wall pieces with screws or nails (I used screws as the potential for missing the nail and hitting the wall piece is reduced). After the first runner is in (again, use your diagram for exact measurements), all of the other pieces will go very quickly. Make sure you leave 4" (more is better) or so between the bottom of the joists and the top of your reference line.


Check out the Armstrong website for some very detailed instructions on installing a drop ceiling.


Hope this helps and good luck.


Steven
 
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