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Hand carried a ton-and-a-half of lumber in to the basement over the weekend, and started framing... fun!


When framing walls, celiings and soffits, I assume you need a to have a frame member for each edge of drywall where there is a joint. For two walls that meet an an inside corner, this means a stud on each wall that form the corner.


How about ceilings? It seems that the top-plate of the wall provides the backing for the top edge for the SR on the wall, but what about that on the ceiling? It seems that I've seen a number of pictres that have rafters running accross the ceiliing, and resting on the top plate of the wall, but no blocking to provide anything to attach to for that ceiling sheet. That would leave 24" 'gaps' between sheetrock screws on the ceiling edges.


Ditto for siffits. When building the soffit 'box', does each edge of the box need to have a backing along it the entire length?
 

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Here is how I did mine. The outer corner(s) of the soffit should be solid to make sure the drywall can be mounted easily. Let me know if you have any more questions. I just finished framing and am waiting for drywall.


Chet
 

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Steve, outside corners should have solid framing behind them. Inside corners where the ceiling meets the walls are okay without backers; the joist span is satisfactory.
 

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Next time you are in HD look for the book "DRYWALL pro tips for hanging and finishing" they describe a floating corner as the preferred way to finish the area where the wall meets the ceiling. Put your ceiling up first and keep all screws at least 8 inches from the edge near the wall. Then put the wall up fitting tight against the ceiling and again keep the screws 8 inches from the top.


Once the drywall is finished properly with corner treatment and mud, this is reported as the best way to avoid future cracks in the corners. So if you believe the guy who wrote the book you can forget about the blocking.
 

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Actually, I was just reading that book this evening and it specifically states that the wood must still be there as a backer you just don't screww into it. Another option is to use corner clips which allow you to delete one of the corner studs.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by scaesare
Hand carried a ton-and-a-half of lumber in to the basement over the weekend, and started framing... fun!
Note for others before they begin: If you are going to buy a large amount of drywall & studs, contact a local commercial /sometimes residential Drywaller. They will sell large quanities cheaper than you can buy it at a local hardware store & they will deliver it. Some will haul it down to your basement for free, while others will charge a little more, but not much.


Cheaper & you can have it delivered to the job site!


Only problem: If you have extra you can't return it so you need to do a really good estimate of how much you need, or get a little less than you think & if you need more, you can buy a couple pieces at the local store.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the replies... and for the attempted picture post, Oversteer. It didn't make it thru, however.


I've been keeping my eye open for details of soffit and wall/corner/ceiling framing in everybody's pics. If you happen to have one that shows a detailed view of how you handled it, I'd appreciate a URL.
 
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