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I have what might be a stupid question about DTS-ES compatible DVD players. From what I understand is that the DTS-ES gets the 6.1 output by matrixing the rear center out into the rear surround channels. To me, that would mean that even if the DVD player does not explicitly say it supports DTS-ES (i.e. the player is marked with the "DTS Digital out" instead of the new "DTS Digital Surround" logo) you will still be able to get 6.1 if you input the digital out to a 6.1 receiver. Am I correct in this assumption?


I had thought that the "DTS Digital Surround" logo meant the DVD player had a 6.1 decoder built in and thus has a 6.1 analog outs. But a friend is telling me they only have 5.1 out. If that is true then what is so special about this player to merit a new DTS logo?
 

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yes, unless you have a very early player, you should be able to get the 6.1. I have a early sony which does not pass the dts bitstream...soon afterward all players started coming out with this capability (they changed the dvd specification)
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by MANTA
I had thought that the "DTS Digital Surround" logo meant the DVD player had a 6.1 decoder built in and thus has a 6.1 analog outs. But a friend is telling me they only have 5.1 out. If that is true then what is so special about this player to merit a new DTS logo?
Please keep in mind that any DVD player that has a dts logo on it will pass the dts bitstream out one of its digital outputs. This does NOT necessarily mean the player has a dts decoder builtin.


Also, I don't know of any DVD players with builtin dts-es decoders (yet). Mainly dts-es capable receivers are being used to decode the dts-es signal. Since dts-es is backward compatible with non-dts-es decoders, a dts-es encoded audio will still play just fine. In fact, I've read where the "es" part of the dts-es signal is additional information that is NOT part of the base dts signal. The dts-es capable receivers "look" for the "es" data where non-dts-es receivers simply do not. That is how the backward compatibility is maintained.


Pece.......
 

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Originally posted by team_slug
My undestanding is that actual DTS-ES is discrete 6.1 channel, i.e. the surround rear cahnnel is not matrixed. Couldbe misinformed, but I thought that was how it is described on the DTS website.
Yup, I believe you are correct, but I think dts-es discrete 6.1 is different than dts-es matrix which is ANOTHER variant of dts-es. Gladiator is dts-es discrete and a few other titles are as well. I'm not sure what titles are dts-es matrix.


I have a printed Widescreen Review article that talks about this stuff... :)


Peace....
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by team_slug
I didn't know that there were two versions. That could explain some things. :)
Well, to confuse you even more, there are actually 4 versions:


DTS-ES Matrix 6.1

DTS-ES Discrete 6.1

DTS-ES Neo 6: Cinema

DTS-ES Neo 6: Music


The latter two are processing in the new DTS-ES decoder to be used to "upgrade" 2-channel sources. Even more confusing is how the Matrix and Discrete formats are applied in real life. Maybe this will help:


All DTS-ES Discrete encoded DVDs contain the extra center back channel info in two ways - one way as a separate extension file, the other way is "matrixed encoded" into the left and right surround info. If your receiver is able to decode DTS-ES Discrete, then it uses the extension file (since it's discrete from the other channels), and cancels out the same info that is matrix encoded in the surrounds. If your processor is only capable of decoding DTS-ES Matrix (many are), then the extension file is ignored and you achieve the same info via matrix processing into the center back channel.


Also, as Tom mentioned, not all DTS-ES DVDs are encoded with the discrete channel. So, the highest processing you can achieve with these sources will be DTS-ES Matrix 6.1. (an example would be Terminator T2 Ultimate Edition and Castaway)


As mentioned before, since the new DTS-ES formats are extension of the original DTS 5.1, they are still totally backwards compatible with existing DTS 5.1 decoders (the extra channel info will just be ignored). As long as your DVD player can pass a DTS signal, it can also pass the DTS-ES encoded info as well.


DB:)
 
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