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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The following is a news release from DTS' website.


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DVB RECOGNIZES DTS DIGITAL SURROUND SOUND AS BROADCAST OPTION

High-Quality Surround Enters Digital Broadcast Arena


AGOURA HILLS, CA November 22, 2002 - DTS, the digital technology company specializing in multi-channel audio for the cinema, pro audio and consumer electronics industries, announces that the DVB (Digital Video Broadcasting) Project has provided a mechanism for carrying the DTS Digital Surround sound format as part of its Digital Television (DTV) specifications. The DVB is a technical consortium of more than 300 companies that is establishing common international specifications for the move from analog to digital broadcasting around the world. Facilitating the inclusion of DTS Digital Surround within the DVB broadcasts offers greater options for surround sound quality for both broadcasters and consumers.


As the globally recognized initiative for adopting new technologies for consumer benefit, the DVB responded to requirements from its members to provide the technical means of carrying the DTS multi-channel audio format in DVB transmissions. DTS Digital Surround technology gives broadcasters new scalable multi-channel audio solutions previously unavailable for broadcasting, including the ability to equal or exceed DVD-quality sound.


"It?s been a great experience working with the DVB over the past two years; they?ve been very supportive of DTS and our efforts in the broadcasting space," said Jon Kirchner, President and CEO of DTS. "We look forward to actively participating in the DVB and the development of DTV worldwide."


"The DVB?s goal is to present the best alternatives for broadcasters to easily adopt DTV," said Peter MacAvock, Executive Director, DVB Project Office. "We believe that the inclusion of DTS as an option for audio in DVB will give broadcasters and viewers more choice and flexibility."


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Again, it's an option. How many of y'all would think that content providers would take up on it?


The second question is would that require an upgrade of the HD set top boxes?



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As much as I would LOVE to see DTS on HD I think the vast majority of broadcasters will think that not enough people have DTS decoders so they will stay with the safe bet of DD. And we certainly don't want any kind of combines DTS/DD signal that would take away bandwidth for the video portion of the HD signal!
 

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I'm not a techie so I don't know how much bandwith a full-bitrate DTS soundtrack will take off a HD signal - I know DTS is something like 1.5Mbps.


But Columbia TriStar has produced SuperBit DVDs that has only DD and DTS soundtracks and allotted the rest to the video, and the results to some who have a big enough screen size is that they can see more detail.


DVD gets at most 10Mbps. Combining the 754 kbps DTS and 448 kbps DD tracks would make that to be a fixed rate of 1.1 Mpbs, leaving the rest for video. The rest are compressed MPEG-2 video.


DVD compressionists say that after a certain video bitrate increments, the additional level of detail that you see from low-bitrate to high-bitrate diminishes ever so slightly. What this means is that a scene encoded at 8Mbps would not have a significant amount of detail if the same scene were encoded at 5-6 Mbps.


So if a HDTV signal has 19 Mpbs and you spend 1.1 - 2.0 Mpbs on audio with the rest on video, I would venture a guess that a DTS track would take off only a slight, if at all, amount of detail on an OTA HD broadcast.


Whether or not content providers would actually use it, I have no idea. I hope they do. After all, a lot of the entry level receivers now have DD/DTS decoding already.



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Quote:
Originally posted by WriteSimple
I'm not a techie so I don't know how much bandwith a full-bitrate DTS soundtrack will take off a HD signal - I know DTS is something like 1.5Mbps.


But Columbia TriStar has produced SuperBit DVDs that has only DD and DTS soundtracks and allotted the rest to the video, and the results to some who have a big enough screen size is that they can see more detail.


DVD gets at most 10Mbps. Combining the 754 kbps DTS and 448 kbps DD tracks would make that to be a fixed rate of 1.1 Mpbs, leaving the rest for video. The rest are compressed MPEG-2 video.


DVD compressionists say that after a certain video bitrate increments, the additional level of detail that you see from low-bitrate to high-bitrate diminishes ever so slightly. What this means is that a scene encoded at 8Mbps would not have a significant amount of detail if the same scene were encoded at 5-6 Mbps.


So if a HDTV signal has 19 Mpbs and you spend 1.1 - 2.0 Mpbs on audio with the rest on video, I would venture a guess that a DTS track would take off only a slight, if at all, amount of detail on an OTA HD broadcast.


Whether or not content providers would actually use it, I have no idea. I hope they do. After all, a lot of the entry level receivers now have DD/DTS decoding already.



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The video on HD takes FAR more bandwidth (MB's) then DVD video and at 19.2Mb's the added DTS would force the video to be further compressed to alot for the DTS signal.
 

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Originally posted by FrankS
The video on HD takes FAR more bandwidth (MB's) then DVD video and at 19.2Mb's the added DTS would force the video to be further compressed to alot for the DTS signal.
I *know* that OTA HD has more bandwith when compared to DVD.


At 1.1 Mbps of audio - for half bitrate DTS and full bitrate DD - that leaves 8.9 Mbps for video in Superbit releases. And some people like Superbit titles. At the same rate of audio or at 2.0 Mpbs - for full bitrate DTS and full bitrate DD - that leaves 18 Mbps for video on HD. I'm not saying that adding a DTS wouldn't have an impact on the video presentation. I'm just saying it won't have that big of an impact.


2.0 Mbps:20 Mbps is a 1:9 ratio. On DVD the ratio is 1.1 Mbps:8.9 Mbps which leads to roughly 1:7 ratio. This means that the hypothetical DTS presentation in HD has better video rates than DVD by 2.5% - and that's in Mbps.


I'm sure you know that 10 Mbps on DVD and 20 Mbps on HD is the upper limit of bandwith (20 Mbps for OTA HD, and 25 Mbps for DVHS I believe). Only fast action scenes would require them to be at this rate. With better compression techniques, I believe adding a DTS track won't muck up the HD presentation much. Look at the first generation DVDs and the current ones.


If you're saying HD-video is more important than anything else, then maybe you'd be happier if there is only DD audio at 384 kbps.




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