AVS Forum banner

1 - 20 of 67 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,239 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have finally started building my brother’s 1099’s after a long 4 years that included moving and a million other projects in life getting in the way! My brother wanted some kind of angular design and after a few doodles, this is what we came up with. I’m going with the orange circled one.

3113883


We bought some Rosewood veneer for this build 4 years ago and I finally opened it and checked it out when I was building his sonosub. Looks great!

3113884


My goal is to minimize the eventual telegraph lines of the MDF edges that will show up, even under veneer. Here’s the idea I’m going with. I set up my dado stack and will run both vertical back edges of the baffles through the angled blade creating a rabbet that includes a 4 degree angle for the side panels.

3113885


In that picture, imagine the panel that is vertical in the pic as the end view of a baffle with the horizontal piece representing a side wall attached. You can see that 4 degrees is the sharpest angle possible while using the original ports.
After figuring out a plan, I spent a few minutes drilling out the screw holes for the mids and the waveguides and then got the baffle extensions cut and glued up.

3113889
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,239 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Here’s something that took a little while to decide on. Since the bottom portion of the front panels will be veneered and the upper portion (the original baffle panel) will be sprayed Duratex and then hidden under a grill, I wanted to add a slight step where I joined the two panels so that the veneered surface would lay flat with the Duratexed surface, in other words, a smooth transition between the two.
To get the step right, I spent some time experimenting with scrap pieces and the biscuit jointer. I just changed the position of the slots on the baffle extension pieces. Here’s what I mean.

3114029


Accounting for the typical thickness of a few sprayed coats of Duratex and the contact cement plus the paper backed veneer, I think they will be pretty close to each other.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
You do incredible work. I'm looking forward to seeing the completed project. They're amazing speakers. I'm glad I was able to finally score a set of them.

Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
220 Posts
Oh man I am pumped to see some 1099 action!!

I've got my three in the paint stage and will update when I have more pics and progress but like damn all these people with wood working shops and ****, lol.

I've got three saw horses behind my couch in my entertainment room with towels on the floor...lol!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,239 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I had a few minutes tonight to mess with these. The consequence of stepping the baffle extension slightly to make depth for the veneer on the outside is that the opposite step happens on the inside of the baffle. That would be fine except that I’m running a rabbet down both edges of the baffle and having that step there would disrupt that line. So to take care of that, I ran both panels through the drum sander a few times and now the insides of the baffles are all flat, no more step.

3114664


Finally, I ran both panels through the 4 degree angled dado stack to create the rabbets on both edges. Turned out great! Here’s the rabbets and then a couple of scrap panels clamped in to show what’s happening.

3114666

3114667

3114668


Perfect angle for the ports to still fit!

3114669
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Looking good, do you have any concern with the ports buzzing when in use being so close to the wall?

Sent from my ONEPLUS A6000 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,239 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Looking good, do you have any concern with the ports buzzing when in use being so close to the wall?

Sent from my ONEPLUS A6000 using Tapatalk
Thanks! No, there is a couple mm between the edge of the port and the side wall. It just wasn’t all aligned for the picture. They won’t be touching when it’s all done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
Very nice work! A drum sander is something that I could make good use of. But it would need to be a small one due to the limited space of my shop. Do you have any experience with the small drum sanders and have any advice on which ones are good?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,239 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
@Charles Collins I'm not sure what you consider as small, but I see Grizzly offers one as small as a 10" capacity. I have the Laguna SuperMax 19-38 and it's the only drum sander I have experience with. I never thought I would use it as much as I do, but I use it often. Since my planer is only a 13" benchtop style, I have used the extra capacity on my sander to plane down rough cut boards instead when in a pinch. Works great!
In my mind, the overall difference in shop space footprint between a small capacity machine and a larger one is negligible. As with every other machine in my garage, the sander is on casters and can be tucked away when I'm not using it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
@Charles Collins I'm not sure what you consider as small, but I see Grizzly offers one as small as a 10" capacity. I have the Laguna SuperMax 19-38 and it's the only drum sander I have experience with. I never thought I would use it as much as I do, but I use it often. Since my planer is only a 13" benchtop style, I have used the extra capacity on my sander to plane down rough cut boards instead when in a pinch. Works great!
In my mind, the overall difference in shop space footprint between a small capacity machine and a larger one is negligible. As with every other machine in my garage, the sander is on casters and can be tucked away when I'm not using it.

Thanks, I already have a few other power tools on wheels. I might try to figure out something.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,239 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Big progress last night! These things are taking shape. Lots of angles and all miter joints are making this challenging, but that’s what it’s about for me. Aside from a 1/4” strip on each of the baffle side edges, I am building these so there is no other MDF “endgrain” anywhere on the cabinets.
Who says you can’t get repeatable cuts using a track saw?

3115056



3115057


Note these joints are not glued or anything. They’ll be nice and tight when I’m done with them. Most importantly, the backs are parallel to the baffles (so far).

3115058
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,780 Posts
I want a track saw, for the very same reason. Plus I work with a lot of slabs and track saws are pretty much the go to for those.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,239 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I want a track saw, for the very same reason. Plus I work with a lot of slabs and track saws are pretty much the go to for those.
I've had my Makita SP6000J1 kit since January 2014 and have used the snot out of it. Still looks and works like new. When I start a new project like this one, I set up the cutting table I built that allows me to make all the big cuts on a full sheet of MDF using the track saw. If the broken down panels need additional work, I'll move over to the table saw, like for the miters in this case. Most importantly, I am not working on the floor or trying to wrestle full sheets of MDF on the table saw, and when hooked up to my vac, the dust collection is very good on it. I used it for a couple of kitchens worth of 2 inch thick butcherblock countertop cuts and it worked great. For around $400, I highly recommend the Makita kit. If you are regularly doing thick slabs and such, you may have to look elsewhere for more power (and spend way more money).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,780 Posts
I’m not sure which kit would come with more power. The Festool for example is comparatively weak despite costing a brick.

I won’t need power I think. Right now I’m using a straight edge and a 6.5” battery powered Makita. I can stall that really easy without much effort.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,762 Posts
I had to look up what a track saw was. How did I not know about these? I've been using a Dewalt circular saw with aluminum straight-edge to cut up sheets and a small Ryobi table saw to fine-tune the sheet components. A track saw would likely save me some "do-overs".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,239 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
@Trimlock I'll tell you what, if I had money to burn and didn't already own the Makita, I would be going with the Bosch setup that is finally available in the US. The 63" track would be much nicer than the 55" Makita and the Bosch is slightly more powerful at 13 amps vs 12.

@jcmccorm If you can spend for it, a track saw would completely change your game! I used mine for everything I built before I got my table saw and still use it frequently. It can be very accurate (if set up properly) and it's really quick to set up and make cuts with.
 
1 - 20 of 67 Posts
Top