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Is there a dummy's guide to frequency? I was looking at my receiver the other day and it has a built in equalizer. I noticed that it had 10Hz, 100Hz etc. and they were all at 0. should I change this at all? also for speakers, what are the set frequence ranges for tweeters, mids, and bass? I seem to be thoroughly confused about everything that deals with Hz and audio equipmnet.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bad LS1
Is there a dummy's guide to frequency?


Yes, of sorts. Search the 'net with some of these terms.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bad LS1
I was looking at my receiver the other day and it has a built in equalizer. I noticed that it had 10Hz, 100Hz etc. and they were all at 0. should I change this at all? also for speakers, what are the set frequence ranges for tweeters, mids, and bass? I seem to be thoroughly confused about everything that deals with Hz and audio equipmnet.
In theory you would change the boost or cut of specific frequencies to achieve a flat response curve after measuring how the system reproduces sound with all settings first at 0. However, in practice, few people do this and most either leave them set at 0 or adjust to their personal preference, flat curve or not, almost certainly it ends up not flat. It's all a matter of personal preference; try to tune a flat response, or just set it how it sounds good to you.


The only real caution is being heavy handed with the bass/low frequency adjustment. Boosting the bass response requires lots of power and overzealous adjustment may result in driving the receiver/amp beyond it's capacity and possibly damaging it or the speakers.


As far as the numbers listed by each adjustment, they are the "center" frequency most affected by the adjustment. However, they are not absolute adjustments that affect only that exact frequency. There is some degree of overlap to which frequencies above and below the number listed are also affected. As the frequencies get further away from the center frequency, the less effect that particular adjustment has. Think of a hill with the center frequency at the peak and the frequencies on either side going down the slope and being less affected. The height of the peak is the +/- setting you adjust on that control. The steepness of the slope and center frequency is determined by the designer and typically cannot be changed on conventional tone controls. Some tone controls have parametric adjustment which allows you to alter the center frequency, slope, and boost/cut. This may not have been an exact technically correct explaination, but I think it conveys the essence.


There is a wide latitude for defining what point is the transition from bass to midrange to treble. My .02 is that bass is roughly anything below 200-300Hz, midrange from 200-300Hz up to 2-3kHz, and treble from 2-3kHz on up to 20kHz. Of course, this is just my opinion on it...
 
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