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Well its time to coat my freshly built box WOOT, so the question I have is related to the Dupli-Color truck bed coating, the question is PRIME or not PRIME the box, my thoughts are being that the coating is solvent based and will not cause the MDF to expand, so no need for primer.


Being that this product was designed to go on metal there are no instructions for applying it to wood/MDF.


So those of you who have used please let me know if you primed first.


Thanks,

Rob
 

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MDF edges act very different from the normal MDF surface. At the very least you have to seal off the edges because they'll drink up just about anything you give them. I use a Zinsser shellac based primer first.


It's not strictly necessary on the surfaces, but it doesn't hurt. You probably want to do something to the exposed MDF edges though.


Reguar spray primer doesn't seal it up very well unless you make very thick coats and give about 3 of them. The shellac based primer takes only 1-2 coats and it dries pretty quick too. They'll have it just about any home improvement store and most hardware stores too.
 

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I primed my MDF center channel before spraying it with Duplicolor, but I have a friend who used it without primer on MDF and there were no ill effects.
 

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I had mine done by a local linex dealer and asked the same question, he said their was no need to prime as the setting time is lightning fast compared to painting. He said it would be a solid within 5 seconds after spraying it. We were handling it with 5 min after he was done, setting it down on it the sprayed surface. I don't know if that resembles the can spray liner but I was amazed.
 

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I have built about 5 sets of speakers that I finished with it and I did not prime any of them. I spent 25 years selling paint and there was nothing about not priming with this product that seemed objectionable to me. All my speakers were from MDF. The only thing you might notice is on your ends you might notice exceptional absorption, just hit the ends a couple or three times with your full wet coats. Any dry, sucked in areas that still are apparent totally disappear when you finish it with the final texture coat. There is no problem with adhesion when applying without a primer.


Harold
 

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Depending on temperature, at 60 - 80 degrees, probably 1 hour to handle lightly and overnight to use. At high temperatures, 100+, you probably would want to get them into a cooler area to spray. The high temperature will cause the material to dry to a powder while it's still in the air, causing a very sandy textured finish.


Harold
 

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After you get the box coated and it's dry please post some pictures.
 

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Sorry to bring this thread up again since its a month old, but i figured its easier to comment here than start a new thread. About how thick does the spray on bedliner get, and does it hide the imperfections in mdf like say a wood veneer would? Also If i sprayed the box do you think i could glue veneer on top of it in case i didnt like it?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by oachalon /forum/post/13171789


Sorry to bring this thread up again since its a month old, but i figured its easier to comment here than start a new thread. About how thick does the spray on bedliner get, and does it hide the imperfections in mdf like say a wood veneer would? Also If i sprayed the box do you think i could glue veneer on top of it in case i didnt like it?

Thickness depends on how many coats you do, I would guesstimate 1/8th" average, that's about what mine is but I had it done by linex.


It'll hide slight imperfections better than paint but I wouldn't wimp on on the prep work for that reason, doesn't take that long to fill any seems and imperfections then run a sander over it to get a smooth surface.


NO I would not even think of gluing veneer over it, if it comes to the point you want to do a veneer then it shouldn't be that hard to peel, scrape and sand back down to a smooth mdf surface.
 

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The bedliner can get basically as thick as you'd like... you can just keep spraying more. It doesn't go on especially thick, thicker than normal paint but not too much. I wouldn't be using it to hide imperfections, nor would I use veneer for that. It's best to fill imperfections first. I'm assuming that by imperfections you mean small dents and the like.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by oachalon /forum/post/13171789


Sorry to bring this thread up again since its a month old, but i figured its easier to comment here than start a new thread. About how thick does the spray on bedliner get, and does it hide the imperfections in mdf like say a wood veneer would? Also If i sprayed the box do you think i could glue veneer on top of it in case i didnt like it?

I had a pair of speakers that I originally sprayed with truck bed liner. Later on when I decided to veneer them I just went after them with my random orbital sander and some 60-80 grit paper. I do not recall if I removed ALL of the truck bed liner but I got most of it. The veneer went on well and still looks great after about 6 months. FYI, I used the wood glue irion on method with paper backed veneer.
 
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