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I made some room treatments to cover my first order reflection point and then randomly elsewhere in the room to amp up the WAF factor.

My wife found a place that creates wallpaper on Etsy. I contacted the vendor and she was very nice. I asked her to send me the vectorized version of the design and promised not to send it out. We created enough black border around the outside to treatments frame. She charged me 30 Euro for each file picture which I thought was a pretty good deal with the amount of modifying she did.
I used SpoonFlower and sent them to version to get it printed on their Performance Knit which has some stretch. I was able to get approx 56" x 36" and accounting for the frame the end result was approx 48" x 28" for the exterior diameter.



Here are the designs:

https://www.etsy.com/listing/589266961/dark-floral-removable-wallpaper-dutch?ref=shop_home_active_49

https://www.etsy.com/listing/589031209/dutch-floral-wall-mural-big-flowers?ref=shop_home_active_51
 
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Framing

I used 4" poplar for the frame which I knew was going to be straight. I also use some spare MDF as cross bracing. Then I grabbed some small L brackets to ensure the corners were reinforced. I also glued and clamped the sides because... AVS


 

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Insulation

DENIM

Given that I have young children I went with Denim insulation. The standard guidance is that hard OC703 fiberglass which is hard to find and obviously has minor health considerations. I was worried about using denim because it can be dusty and I used it on my basement build and was unruly for something this precise. However, I found these small rolls which are 4' x 16". They are very easy to work with and are well contained so there's not much tearing. I could fit about 2 stacked for 3.5" inside my 2.5" frame.

SCREEN
I used fiberglass screen and bought 4' length and thank goodness for my electric stapler. I was able to get it stapled nicely on both sides! Make sure you do the bracing side first, put in the insulation, then the front. I did but why not warn you. Also, make sure you trim everything real good because it will show through the performance knit if you pull it tight.

ADHESIVE
I ran some wood glue along the braces and a touch on the sides. Then I also used spray adhesive and sprayed the insultion to get the two layers to fasten to themselves so they don't bunch downward with gravity

 

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Stretching and Other tips

I didn't get pics of this part but... I went into my kitchen and taped the fabric down. Then I centered the frame brace side up. I pulled one side tight and stapled, next side, stapled, ect... until the final side. You have to fold the edges like a present and it creates a triangle.

You'll want to do it on the side that's out of view (top and bottom). TRIM THE SCREEN flush with the frame. If it's too short or too long you'll see the screen.

The nice thing about the performance knit is I could pull it darn tight and didn't need to worry about getting rid of creases.

After all that trim the back. I didn't trim a ton off so I used black duct tape to hold everything in place.

I used French Cleats to hang them. THESE WERE GREAT. No screwing into the walls and an integrated level.

https://www.menards.com/main/tools-hardware/fasteners-fastener-accessories/picture-mirror-hanging-hardware/hangman-products-reg-150lb-18-steel-picture-frame-hanger/apt-18/p-1444432034408-c-13085.htm?tid=-464518909397459210&ipos=1

 
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The final products

Behold the final product (my in wall rear-surrounds are too high! It kills me everytime I see them... lets not get into that, I'm aware the placement constraints)... They look great and my wife is pleased. 48x28x2.5 with 3.5" of insulation and Bob Golds absorption coefficents are very similar to OC703 especially up above 250Hz which is why I have these.





 

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Looks great! Do you have any measurements with and without the treatments?
 
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Looks great! Do you have any measurements with and without the treatments?
Not yet! I’ll have some before from a while ago. I hope the new ones are better becuse these aren’t moving no matter what (I was lucky enough to have them).

I can say I feel like I’m getting more out of my surrounds (like I notice them more). If this maintains, I’m gonna be so pumped. It’s the last thing I miss from my Marantz. The Audyssey DEQ really worked the surrounds nicely
 

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You should name your theater the "Wife Cave"
LOL! We call it our basement! Working within the constraints has been interesting
 

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Those look great! Thank you for sharing the information and pictures.

Putting up absorptive panels in my room was the biggest audio upgrade I've ever done (the HTM's were a huge improvement as well, but I already had the panels so I can't judge which was the better improvement :) )

If you and your wife like the pattern, *and* you accomplish some sound control, it's a win-win for everyone.
 

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DENIM

Given that I have young children I went with Denim insulation. The standard guidance is that hard OC703 fiberglass which is hard to find and obviously has minor health considerations. I was worried about using denim because it can be dusty and I used it on my basement build and was unruly for something this precise. However, I found these small rolls which are 4' x 16". They are very easy to work with and are well contained so there's not much tearing. I could fit about 2 stacked for 3.5" inside my 2.5" frame.
I've never worked with Denim insulation before, but anything has got to be better than the skin-peeling itch of OC703 or Roxul SS.

I wish I had of put on a hazmat suit before insulating my theater, something beyond even painter coveralls.
The fibers never come out in the wash, and if any green-glue touches the clothing it is pretty much on there forever.
Definitely a "wear scrubs and throw them out afterward" ordeal.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
DENIM

Given that I have young children I went with Denim insulation. The standard guidance is that hard OC703 fiberglass which is hard to find and obviously has minor health considerations. I was worried about using denim because it can be dusty and I used it on my basement build and was unruly for something this precise. However, I found these small rolls which are 4' x 16". They are very easy to work with and are well contained so there's not much tearing. I could fit about 2 stacked for 3.5" inside my 2.5" frame.
I've never worked with Denim insulation before, but anything has got to be better than the skin-peeling itch of OC703 or Roxul SS.

I wish I had of put on a hazmat suit before insulating my theater, something beyond even painter coveralls.
The fibers never come out in the wash, and if any green-glue touches the clothing it is pretty much on there forever.
Definitely a "wear scrubs and throw them out afterward" ordeal.
Denim was a delight. When I did my basement I was hand tearing it without gloves. The only issue was when I got too hot I took my mask off and got some dust in my nostrils.

Oh the horrors I green glue. I got the 5 gallon buckets and massive syringe. Cutting the holes in the drywall after it was hung for the in-walls and can lights just flung it everywhere. Brutal stuff to work with. Between the staggered studs, GG and double 3/4” with denim and pink R13 it works darn good. I wish I would have went steel studs and hat channels. That would have been the perfect set up. But honestly it works really really good
 

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Discussion Starter #13
DENIM

Given that I have young children I went with Denim insulation. The standard guidance is that hard OC703 fiberglass which is hard to find and obviously has minor health considerations. I was worried about using denim because it can be dusty and I used it on my basement build and was unruly for something this precise. However, I found these small rolls which are 4' x 16". They are very easy to work with and are well contained so there's not much tearing. I could fit about 2 stacked for 3.5" inside my 2.5" frame.
I've never worked with Denim insulation before, but anything has got to be better than the skin-peeling itch of OC703 or Roxul SS.

I wish I had of put on a hazmat suit before insulating my theater, something beyond even painter coveralls.
The fibers never come out in the wash, and if any green-glue touches the clothing it is pretty much on there forever.
Definitely a "wear scrubs and throw them out afterward" ordeal.
Check Bob Golds coefficients on the denim vs OC the only area where OC is markedly better is down low. But in reality the best downlow treatment is mass and transference. So hats and double drywall have that covered

All that being said, give denim a shot if you get an opportunity
 

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