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I'm seeing something odd when I use a DVD-RAM as a filesystem for backups, and I'm wondering if anyone else has seen something like this.


I own a Panasonic E50 and an Iomega Super DVD. My PC drive was filling up and I needed to move off some large CD image files to secondary storage. I had an empty DVD-RAM lying around that had been formatted by my E50. I loaded it in the Iomega drive. Windows saw it as a filesystem that contained a DVD_RTAV directory which itself contained a couple of small files (.vro and .bpo, I think).


Anyway, I created another top-level directory on the DVD-RAM and started to copy (just drag and drop under Windows) my files directly into that directory. The copying was a little slow, but it looked like the files were getting copied okay. After three or four copies, though, I suddenly noticed some of the files that had been successfully copied were getting truncated to nothing, or even deleted, as I kept adding additional files.


Any ideas on whether this is buggy behavior or not? Or is it that the filesystem created by the Panasonic on the DVD-RAM isn't really up to Windows spec, and will therefore lose information? I'm about to try formatting a DVD-RAM with the software that came with my Iomega instead, but meanwhile I was wondering if any of this rang a bell with anyone.
 

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I did this last week when I tried to move instead of copy a file from the RAM to the HDD. I said to cancel the operation but Win XP erased several supposedly "read-only" files anyway. Does anyone know of any tools that would enable you to restore the files similar to what you would have with actual hard drive tools?
 

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I have been unsuccessful at finding a tool that can recover files from the UDF 2.0 based file system typically used on "video mode" formatted DVD-RAM. If I plan to use the DVD-RAM for data storage (vice video files) I format the disc using FAT32 so that traditional FAT-based data recovery tools can be used in the event of a problem.
 
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