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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm curious if anyone knows about the reliability of these two types of media. There seems to be much speculation regarding the true life of DVD-Rs and from my experience, it's warranted. I've had DVDs crap out on me with cyclical redundancy errors after a year... pathetic.


The Pioneer writes to Double Layer which is a nice addition although I'm unsure whether (1) this is playable in any double layer DVD player other than the Pioneer and (2) if it is any more/less durable than standard grade DVD-Rs.


The Toshiba camp has been proclaiming the superiority of DVD-RAM which I don't know much about but it seems to be debated. Some claim that good branded DVD-Rs will work well (I have way too many Memorex that were on sale and I hear the comments coming now) and claim Tayo Yuden and others (feel free to list) are just as reliable/unreliable.


Does anyone have comments, opinions, or better yet - scientific data - that might support the long term viability of the media. Like most of us, Double Layer is great but it isn't going to help us if we can't play it in a year...
 

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The single most important thing you can do to prevent discs from dying on you is to start with quality media from a manufacturer with a good track record. If you buy a batch of 50 discs and get a few coasters out of them, it probably means you've as many or even more discs whose recordings are marginal and just barely good enough to pass muster. Some folks seem to figure that they're beating the system if they pay 30% less for cheap discs and only 10% of their burns are bad. Those are the ones getting the rude awakenings.


After many bad experiences with Memorex discs, I've now turned to Maxell. In all of the Maxell discs I've bought I've never had a coaster. This gives me a lot of confidence that the burns are good and robust.


Regarding RAM vs other - RAM is rated at a greater number of read/write cycles than other media. This is partly because it's designed as a block-replaceable medium - you can use it in a computer system just like a floppy disk (ie, you can drag-and-drop individual files to it, rename and erase individual files, etc., rather than having to burn a bunch of files all at once in a "session"). Whether this translates to better longevity for recorded data is a mystery to me. I haven't heard many people complaining about DVD-RAM discs going bad, but that may be because not as many people use them.
 

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Regarding RAM vs other - RAM is rated at a greater number of read/write cycles than other media. This is partly because it's designed as a block-replaceable medium - you can use it in a computer system just like a floppy disk (ie, you can drag-and-drop individual files to it, rename and erase individual files, etc., rather than having to burn a bunch of files all at once in a "session"). Whether this translates to better longevity for recorded data is a mystery to me. I haven't heard many people complaining about DVD-RAM discs going bad, but that may be because not as many people use them.


:) :D :)


I like DVD-RAM for several reasons. First, it is just like using a hard disk in a computer. When you delete something on it, the space is immediately available for use (new recordings). No finializing, etc. You can use it just like a hard disk in your DVD recorder.
 

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Being rated for many read/write cycles is not the same thing as being rated for long-term storage of static data. I believe that -RAM was also designed for professional archival use (libraries and such), which would make it the most reliable storage. It's way too costly for that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by dlh2001
Regarding RAM vs other - RAM is rated at a greater number of read/write cycles than other media....


I like DVD-RAM for several reasons. First, it is just like using a hard disk in a computer. When you delete something on it, the space is immediately available for use (new recordings). No finializing, etc. You can use it just like a hard disk in your DVD recorder.
Yep, I read that article too. Another says that RAM's longevity is less than DVD-R although it has a good failsafe system but that too is dependent upon disc longevity. But with regard to RAM, not all players can play it nor can they all play each other's recordable RAMs so, again, the choice wasn't clear. For DL discs I can't find anything about longevity just that people love the fact you can fit full movies/DVDs at full quality and audio on a double layer.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by slinky
Yep, I read that article too. Another says that RAM's longevity is less than DVD-R although it has a good failsafe system but that too is dependent upon disc longevity. But with regard to RAM, not all players can play it nor can they all play each other's recordable RAMs so, again, the choice wasn't clear. For DL discs I can't find anything about longevity just that people love the fact you can fit full movies/DVDs at full quality and audio on a double layer.


That is correct. I use DVD-RAM for DVD's that I intend to keep for archiving purposes. When I need to give a DVD to some else I use -R or +R simply because -RAM is not that widely used by other people and their equipment. But, having said that, I also have to say that I have never had a DVD-RAM disk fail on me yet.
 

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Another thing to consider regarding longevity is whether the medium will continue to be supported. If DVD-RAM isn't very popular, it's conceivable that in 2 or 3 years time manufacturers will stop making equipment that can read it. Should that happen, it won't matter too much whether the disc is "readable" or not - you'll have to copy everything to some other format in order to make sure you won't loose access to your recordings.
 
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