AVS Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I think some of you are doing this and I have a couple of questions.


1) It is my understanding that the video on the recorder would be mpeg2 format. Then, if you want to edit it on the computer (frame accurate), you'd have to convert it to DV or some other format. Then, when you go to burn the final DVD, you have to go back to mpeg2. (If this isn't right, please correct.) What I'm wondering is if all the transcoding puts a big hit on video quality. For example, if doing the generic VHS to DVD archiving, would it be better to just get something like a Canopus ADVC rather than going to a standalone DVD recorder and then to the computer? Does it make much of a difference? Also, does using RW vs RAM make any difference?


2) If you have any experience with it, would having good NLE and DVD authoring programs on the computer obviate the need for a HDD? Are the editing capabilities on the recorders adequate for more than simply removing commercials? Is going to the computer a big enough hassle that most would rather simply stay on the recorder?


Thanks in advance for any advice or opinions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
529 Posts
1. No, you don't have to convert to DV format. There are several software packages that allow editting of MPEG files. Some packages (such as TMPGenc DVD Author) only allow edits on I-frames. This is sufficient as long as there is a gap (approx 1/2 second) around the video to be removed (by gap I mean the black screen which appears between commercials). If there isn't a long enough gap, then you may get slight hesitation/freeze at the edit point during playback. There are other packages (such as MPEG2VCR) which allow for frame accurate editting.


2. You can definitely get better results on a computer. The editting capabilities on the recorder are sufficient. However, they are limited to I-frame edits. So the same rules apply as I described above. Even if you go the computer route, I would still suggest getting a recorder with a HDD. The reason being is that it allows you to record longer length material at higher quality. For example, say theres a 3 hour program to be recorded. However, once commercials are removed the program is really only 2 hours 10 minutes. With a HDD recorder you can record the whole program at SP mode, edit it on the deck and then high speed dub to DVDR. This will give you the best quality possible (on a single disk). To get the same results without a HDD recorder, you would have to be there to monitor the recording and then change the disk around the half way point. Then take the 2 disks to your PC, edit and join the 2 disks to burn to DVDR. There are many other advantages of a HDD model.


Hope this helps.
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top