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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I saw the Panasonic DVD recorder today. the E20... I think..... However, with that deck, once you write on a disc, that's it....................you can't erase..... and then reuse the same disc.


When will decks that are re-writable be out ?

And also,,,, what is the difference between

What is the best one?


DVD-RW

DVD+RW

DVD RAM ?


Are there any recording DVD formats that I'm missing ?


I need to replace a VCR, I was looking at the JVC HRS7900........ but it seems like a waste to get a SVHS deck now.......... when DVD recording is here.


Thanks

Shelly
 

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In a simple way of putting it you have 4 formats, depending on the DVD recorder you are using and the end use intended:


1. DVD-R General


Use this for machines that require it for record once and finalize it so it can't be recorded over, just played forever. Good for making a DVD for distribution or permanent personal archive.


2. DVD-R Authoring


Use this for the same purpose above but only in those DVD writers that specifically require this type of DVD media. These are older more expensive and in computer type of disk writers. Good for making DVDs for distribution and personal archive.


3. DVD-RW


This is a reusable media spec to be used in the Pioneer made recorders.


4. DVD-RAM


This is a reusable media spec for Panasonic made recorders.




None of these formats is 100% compatible with all DVD players but the DVD-R format seems to be the best for all player compatibility with today's modern DVD players. Whether you select the DVD-RW or DVD-RAM is largely a personal decision. DVD-R is currently the lowest cost per disk media for distribution and $2.95 per disk cost. DVD-RAM is at $17 per disk.



I have the Panasonic E20. The way it works on DVD-R is that you can erase a program after you record it but you will lose that capacity on the disk. I explain-- Say you record a 30 minute program at the XP speed (1 hour capacity setting). Now you have 30 minutes left. Next you record a 15 minute program by mistake. To prevent that program from being played back you may erase that program, however, you will not recover that 15 minutes of burn once capacity on the disk. Now you have 15 minutes of space left. because you have 30 minutes of programming, 15 minutes of erased programming and 15 minutes left. But, you decide you need another 30 minute program on that disk. Just select the SP mode which now increases the capacity to 30 minutes and now record that program. You can title the disk, and title each recorded program. The last thing you want to do is "FINALIZE" the disk which now prevents any further modification and makes the DVD-R a DVD-Video disk for playback in most all modern players. Note- you can remove and reinsert a non-finalized partially recorded disk with no problems.


The two modes that seem to be very good are the XP (one hour mode) and the SP (2 hour mode). Since you will be finalizing the DVD-R anyway, it is prudent to record any program to the XP mode if it is known to be less than 1 hour and then SP if the total recordings are to be less than 2 hours. However you can mix the different modes on the same DVD-R and once finalized, only you will know which was which unless you have super vision and can detect the slight increase in softness from the SP (2 hour) mode over the XP mode. For most people, the SP mode will be more than adequate. The Panasonic also has an FR mode that offers a variable bit rate when you want he recordings to fill the disk but the recordings are longer than the selected (XP,SP,LP,EP) modes will allow. It automatically selects these modes in combination to fit the programming but goes no more than EP. This mode(FR) is very difficult to use for manual dubbing but is better suited for off air program recording and is only allowed when using the timer setup for automatic scheduled unattended recording.
 

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Don, thanks for that informative explanation. I noticed you

mentioned blanks at $2.95 per, where can i get this price?

I have a buddy that just ordered a unit, and i'd like to advise

hgim of this price.


thanks,


Winston
 

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Winston- The thread with the link is on this forum.
 

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Don - Thank you for all the information you have been providing about the DMR-E20. Panasonic's web site is woefully short of information about this product. Since you have one, could you fill us in on the following:


1. Are the component outputs on the back of the E20 progressive scan or interlaced.


2. If the E20 outputs progressive scan, can you tell us what deinterlacing chip the unit has in it?


3. I noticed from pictures posted on ebay the E20 has an optical digital audio output. Can you tell us if the E20 outputs 5.1 dolby digital audio?


Thanks,

Dennis
 

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I have read lots of discussion about DMR E20 at this forum.

I'm one of the DMR E20 users. I bought he DVD recorder at osaka

on July.


It's a useful recorder for various video materials, including LD

Hi-8 and SVHS tape. DMR E20 only provides analog input (no

i-link) , composite & S. It output the 480i image,not 480p.

But i don't care about this. You can buy a p-scan player for 480p.

Let recorder do the recording things only.


If you record video from LD, Hi-8 or SVHS tape, that's nearly

identical from original. If you record from DVD-video, you will

find a little bite color decay and resolution decrease. Of course

you have to remove the anti-copy analog signal first. "Golden box" Peter N previously mentioned will do the job.


If you want the identical DVD vision, computer is the only choice.


DMR-E20 is easy to use, and cheaper than DVR-7000.


I find video recorded with DVD-RAM got better quality than DVD-R.

Anyone experienced that ?
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Peter Y


DMR-E20 is easy to use, and cheaper than DVR-7000.



Just got off the phone with J&R music world ( www.jandr.com ), and found out that you can preorder a DVR-7000 for only 1399. . . granted its still more expensive then the DMR-E20, but it levels the playing field a bit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So, it would be better to take a look at the Pioneer when it comes out ?


You can re-record discs....


Even though its more expensive at first, it seems like in the long run, it would be better,....


Will discs recorded on the pioneer play on current players such as the Sony 9000ES ?


I'd like to avoid getting another VCR, although, I must say, the quality of video from my old JVC SVHS through an Iscan pro looks pretty good, all things considered..... It's definitely watchable....

But I do like to get new technology. :)


Thanks

Shelly
 

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The E20 DOES NOT DO P-SCAN.


I mentioned this in a previous thread but that was last week. The problem is that people are looking at the E10 and trying to conjecture that the E20 is an updated version. It is a different recorder.


The main advantage to me is that the Pioneer 7000 has 1394 I/O so if that is important to you then do for it!



I agree with Peter Y that there is a small bit of chroma saturation hit with the E20. Likewise with the Pioneer 7000. I measured it with the vector scope and it is about 7% reduced and can easily be brought back to SMPTE spec with a Y/C procamp. This is what I do here. The overall PQ, however is not less than that of betacam SP in the XP mode and using a broadcast monitor in Y/C input mode does equally as well as any betacam SP dub in Y/C mode. It does not do as well as betacam SP dub in YUV mode. While my first tests with SVHS indicate that it also produces identical PQ as the original SVHS it also produces near original PQ as the original SVHS in SP (2 hour) mode. I was very impressed by this. If you are considering a 7000 or E20 for replacement of an SVHS VCR, don't worry about PQ. This new DVD-R or RAM will be more than adequate and will probably surpass the quality of SVHS even on broadcast original recordings. Soon DVD-R will be quite competitive with SVHS blank media and given that PQ is not an issue, the day has arrived when DVD-R will be taking over on the home video recording base.


Re- Audio:

There is no way to record DD5.1 on the E20. It only has analog audio inputs and this audio is converted to DD for the recording. and when you connect the output of the E20 to the optical input of your amp it will output the DD2.0 signal.


As was previously stated, for best modern features on playback, get a good P-scan player. I bought the RP56. Consider the E20 as your recorder for DVD-R and DVD-RAM. One is permanent and the other is for internal re-recording.
 

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Pioneer DVR 7000 use DVD-RW that could be re-recorded for 1000 times.


DVD-RW could be play on pioneer DVD player like DV-343.


Panasonic DMR-E20 use DVD-RAM also do the re-record job, and

up to 100000 times. If you want to easily record and erase the

video programs, DMR-E20 would let you down.


DVD-RAM could be play on panasonic DVD player RP-91.


As Don said, DVD-R is the only media could be play on most

DVD player.
 

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DB-

You asked-
Quote:
So, if I understand what you are saying, you cannot make a DVD-R copy of a DVD that has 5.1 dolby digital sound with the DMR-E20?
What part of "Re- Audio:

There is no way to record DD5.1 on the E20. " don't you understand?
 

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Not only you cannot make a copy of a DVD DD5.1 (or dts) audio track onto DVD-R or DVD-RAM or DVD-RW but if the source DVD has macrovision or other protection you can't copy it *at all*, picture and sound.
 

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Don,


Shelly asked about DVD+RW and I noticed no mention of that format in the replies. I'm interested in what you think the future of the format is. I've heard that the DVD Forum is not supporting it. Are the "next generation" recorders going to support it? Also, have you heard anything on what the cost of the DVD+RW blank media will be?


Thanks

Wayne
 

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My crystal ball tells me that DVD-RW will not last unless Pioneer can make it's recorders competitive with Panasonic's E20 as well as the media. At this point DVD-RAM is cheap enough, however I'm not really studying this media. I'm interested in DVD-R.


For example, I was a customer for the DVR-7000 or the PRV9000. After I learned about the Panasonic E20, I switched that quick. Pioneer hasn't even introduced a unit into this country and already they are out stripped by the competition. That alone will cause the RW format to fail unless they get their competitive act together.
 

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Don,

Just thought I'd mention that I picked up a Sony Vaio with DVD writing capability. I've been having great success with it in conjunction with Pinnacle's DVD program. I've burned a couple of DVDs from firewire input DV material and they play great in the 2 DVD players I have (an older Proscan and a Sony of a couple of years ago). I'm very impressed with the quality, which seems indistinguishable from the original DV material (I didn't do an A/B, but my feeling is based on just eyeballing the material).


I'm curious as to the rendering times you've experienced with the Panasonic. With my setup it appears to be about 3X the original material. Thus a 10 minute program will complete in about 30 minutes.
 

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"Not only you cannot make a copy of a DVD DD5.1 (or dts) audio track onto DVD-R or DVD-RAM or DVD-RW but if the source DVD has macrovision or other protection you can't copy it *at all*, picture and sound."


Strictly speaking, this is not true. If you use a computer DVD-R recorder drive, you can rip a DVD with any of several available utilities (which bypass Macrovision and CSS altogether). You can then re-encode the rip to the standard VOB files with one of several recently released codecs that support DD 5.1.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
So.... if I had the Panasonic E20, and DVD-RAM discs, I can record on them, then erase it, and re-record on the same disc ?


And DVD-R's, can just be recorded on once, when finalized ?


Is this correct ?

If so, I may have to go out and get a new toy ;)

Thanks

Shelly
 

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To copy a DVD on the E10/E20 I believe you would need a macrovision free player like the Skyworth 1050P. Also you might have some problems with region encoding. Someone else might know the details on this a bit better. Riping a DVD is definately done better on a computer.
 

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So.... if I had the Panasonic E20, and DVD-RAM discs, I can record on them, then erase it, and re-record on the same disc ?

>>sure!


And DVD-R's, can just be recorded on once, when finalized ?

>>yes


If so, I may have to go out and get a new toy

>>hurry up!
 
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